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Popular Cytology News and Current Events

Popular Cytology News and Current Events, Cytology News Articles.
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Global hematology diagnostics market estimated to expand at a robust CAGR over 2021
Hematology includes various IVD technologies such as blood analysis, flow cytometry, immunodiagnostics, molecular diagnostics, hemostasis, histology, and cytology. (2018-02-08)
Self-sampling identifies twice as many women at risk of cervical cancer
Using self-sampling followed by HPV testing, more than twice as many women at risk of developing cervical cancer could be identified and offered preventive treatment. (2018-02-15)
Expert panel issues new guidelines for lung cancer molecular testing
Guidelines add ROS1 to list of tests matching lung cancer with targeted treatments, among other updated recommendations. (2018-01-30)
Cold comfort: Fat-rich diets and adaptation among indigenous Siberian populations
Recently, scientists have been exploring the genetic signatures of adaptation in several indigenous cold-adapted human populations. (2017-09-12)
Study links fox domestication to gene activity in the pituitary gland
A study of foxes offers new insights into the brain changes that occur in wild canids as they become more tame, researchers report. (2018-02-14)
Testing the accuracy of FDA-approved and lab-developed cancer genetics tests
Amid the debate about how much these tests should be regulated by the FDA, one question has gone unanswered: how well do LDTs and FDA-CDs perform? (2017-12-14)
Why do we develop high blood pressure?
Abnormally high blood pressure, or hypertension, may be related to changes in brain activity and blood flow early in life. (2017-03-09)
Lymph node surgery could be avoided for some women with aggressive types of breast cancer
Sentinel lymph node biopsies, where lymph nodes are surgically removed to check for signs of breast cancer spread, could be safely avoided for some women, according to research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference. (2018-03-21)
New analytical method provides an insight into additional chromosomes
A new technique promises to identify additional chromosomes involved in carcinogenesis. (2018-02-21)
Endoscopic ultrasound highly accurate in evaluating ambiguous radiographic findings of the pancreas
Researchers from St. Louis University School of Medicine in Missouri report that EUS and EUS-FNA is 99.1 percent accurate in diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms (abnormal growths or tumors) in patients who were referred for endoscopic ultrasound because of CT and/or MRI reports of two common, though somewhat ambiguous findings -- enlargement of head of pancreas or dilation of the pancreatic duct. (2008-08-27)
Leading medical organizations update lung cancer guideline
Rapid advancements in the molecular diagnostic testing of lung cancer have led to new treatments and greater hope for patients battling lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. (2018-01-23)
Researchers confirm IASLC characterization of uncertain R status with prognosis between R0 and R1
The findings of a recent study confirm the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)'s proposed criteria for uncertain resection margin status, R(un), in residual tumor (R) classification. (2017-10-16)
HPV testing is better than the Pap test at detecting cervical cancer
A new paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that testing for cervical cancer using HPV testing in addition to the Pap smear is unlikely to detect cancer cases that wouldn't be found using HPV testing alone. (2017-11-14)
New cervical screening technique no better than conventional smear test
Liquid-based cytology -- a new cervical screening technique being introduced into programmes in the USA and UK -- is no better than the conventional smear test, according an article in this week's issue of The Lancet. (2006-01-12)
Cervical cancer screening method should be changed, research suggests
Cervical cancer screening intervals could be extended to five years for women aged 30 and over if the primary screening method was human papillomavirus testing, say scientists at Queen Mary, University of London. (2010-04-27)
Highly effective cervical cancer screening for low-income countries
Taking a small sample of cells from women at high-risk of cervical cancer could be a cost-effective and accurate strategy for early diagnosis in low and middle income countries, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London. (2017-03-01)
Long-term follow-up of benign thyroid nodules shows favorable prognosis
After five years of follow-up, a majority of asymptomatic, benign thyroid nodules exhibited no significant change in size, or actually decreased in size, and diagnoses of thyroid cancer were rare, according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA. (2015-03-03)
Unresolved composition of Lantana camara: Impediment to its management
A group of plant invasion ecologists from University of Delhi, India, have highlighted the need to disentangle the composition of the highly variable Lantana species complex in order to facilitate management efforts towards this highly invasive species. (2015-04-14)
HPV testing followed by cytology and repeat HPV testing may improve cervical cancer screening
The use of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing as an initial screening step followed by triage with a standard Pap test (cytology) and repeat HPV DNA testing may increase the accuracy of cervical cancer screening, according to a study in the Jan. (2009-01-13)
New function discovered in cancer-prevention protein
Protein p53 is very important in protecting against cancer given that it prevents cancer-causing mutations from accumulating. (2010-06-10)
Routinely used diagnostic approaches: only limited diagnostic sensitivity for bile duct cancer?
A team led by Professor, Dr. Christian Prinz from the Technical University Munich has investigated diagnostic sensitivity of endoscopic brush cytology and forceps biopsy in patients with bile duct cancer. (2008-03-13)
New test improves detection of bladder cancer
Testing for a certain protein in urine was found to increase the accuracy for diagnosis of bladder cancer, according to a study in the February 16 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on medical applications of biotechnology. (2005-02-15)
News brief: Age-specific evaluation of HPV DNA testing vs. cytology screening
Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing with cytology triage is more sensitive than conventional cytology screening for detecting cervical lesions, according to a new study published online Nov. (2009-11-09)
Research shows HPV testing offers women protection for twice as long as smear testing
The long term findings of a study carried out at Hammersmith hospital reveal that testing for human papilloma virus can be twice as effective at protecting women from developing cervical abnormalities as smear testing. (2008-05-14)
New screen-and-treat methods for cervical cancer significantly reduce cancer precursor lesions
A new Columbia University Medical Center study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of two low-tech diagnostic tools to significantly reduce the prevalence of cervical cancer precursor lesions. (2005-11-01)
Adult stem cells lack key pluripotency regulator
The protein Oct4, which helps to maintain embryonic stem cells, has been shown to be virtually absent in adult stem cells. (2007-10-10)
HPV screen-and treat-intervention effective in cervical cancer prevention
Women in South Africa who underwent human papillomavirus DNA-based testing or visual inspection of the cervix followed by treatment of test-positive women with cryotherapy had a statistically significant reduction in high grade cervical cancer precursors, compared with women in a control group, according to a study published online Sept. (2010-09-30)
No justification for colposcopy in screening of young women for cervical cancer
Results of a US study in this week's issue of The Lancet suggest that regular smear tests rather than colposcopy is the best way of monitoring low-grade cervical lesions among adolescents and young women. (2004-11-04)
Clinical trials for 'cytobrush' detection technique show promise in fight against oral cancer
Dentists now have an easy-to-use, pain-free way to detect oral cancer at its earliest stages. (2002-01-04)
CHEST experts issue advice for investigating occupational and environmental causes of chronic cough
Although the understanding of cough triggered by occupational and environmental causes has improved, experts say there is still a gap between current guidelines and clinical practice. (2016-11-03)
HPV testing for 2 high-risk strains could identify women at greatest risk of cervical cancer
Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing for the two most dangerous strains (HPV16 and HPV18) detects more high-grade pre-cancerous lesions (which can lead to cervical cancer) than current cervical cancer screening using cytology alone. (2011-08-22)
Springer and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, announce publishing partnership
Springer, one of the world's leading STM publishers, and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK, have signed an agreement to co-publish Kew Bulletin, the official scientific journal of the Gardens. (2007-11-07)
Light scattering spectroscopy helps doctors identify early pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer has the lowest survival rate among all major cancers, largely because physicians lack diagnostic tools to detect the disease in its early, treatable stages. (2017-03-13)
Researchers publish on connection between anal cancer, HPV
Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, recently published the results of a study demonstrating a connection between anal cancer and human papillomavirus infection. (2016-02-17)
Phase III research represents potential shift in standard of care for bladder cancer
Connaught strain of bacillus Calmette-Guérin proved superior. Patients treated with Tice strain may be at increased risk for recurrence. (2012-04-02)
Current long-term surveillance strategy for women treated for precancerous cervical lesions effective for preventing cervical cancer
Women who have been treated for precancerous cervical lesions face a similar 5-year risk of developing cervical cancer or recurrent disease to women in the general population after three consecutive normal cytological smears (Pap tests), and can return to population-based regular screening. (2011-04-27)
Parents need to be educated about HPV vaccinations for daughters
Parents of young girls may soon be offered the opportunity to have their daughters immunised against a sexually transmitted virus that is the major cause of cervical cancer, Professor Henry Kitchener told the 4th International Conference on Teenage and Young Adult Cancer Medicine. (2006-03-30)
Developing better drugs for asthma and high blood pressure
If a patient is ill and takes drugs for that illness, these drugs often lead to further illnesses and complications. (2016-03-24)
HPV test detects more pre-cancerous cells than conventional smear test
Human papillomavirus screening detects more cervical severe pre-cancerous lesions than conventional cervical screening, finds a study published on today. (2010-04-27)
Study sheds light on determining surgical margins for feline tumors
Researchers are paving the way for more precision in determining surgical margins for an aggressive tumor common in cats by analyzing tissue contraction at various stages of the post-operative examination process. (2017-06-13)
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