Popular Darwin News and Current Events

Popular Darwin News and Current Events, Darwin News Articles.
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Is evolution more intelligent than we thought?
Evolution may be more intelligent than we thought, according to a University of Southampton professor. (2015-12-18)

Paleontology: The eleventh Archaeopteryx
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives. (2018-01-26)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Nora become a hurricane
NASA satellite imagery showed that Tropical Cyclone Nora developed an eye as it strengthened into a hurricane north of Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm, formerly named Tropical Cyclone 16P. (2018-03-23)

Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. New research results show that a plants ability to be less competitive and behave according to the good of the group could be a key feature in the attempt to increase crop yields. (2017-10-02)

NASA satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Marcus near Australia's Cobourg Peninsula Coast
Tropical Cyclone Marcus has developed off the coast of Australia's Northern Territory along the Cobourg Peninsula coast. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a view of the new storm from its orbit in space. (2018-03-16)

Walker receives Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award
Alan Walker, Evan Pugh Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Biology was awarded the Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017 by the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. (2017-01-24)

UF botanists: Flowering plants evolved very quickly into 5 groups
University of Florida and University of Texas at Austin scientists have shed light on what Charles Darwin called the (2007-11-26)

The conflict between males and females could replace the evolution of new species
New research shows that males and females of the same species can evolve to be so different that they prevent other species from evolving or colonising habitats, challenging long-held theories on the way natural selection drives the evolution of biodiversity. (2018-02-21)

VIIRS satellite instrument gets 2 views of Tropical Cyclone Marcus
Tropical Cyclone Marcus was moving along the northern coast of Australia when the VIIRS instrument that flies aboard two different satellites captured true-color images of the storm over two days. (2018-03-19)

Scientists to discover why flamingos are in the pink of health -- in the poo!
Researchers investigate remarkable survival of birds in contaminated Indian waters. (2008-03-11)

A lesson from Darwin
When British naturalist Charles Darwin traveled to the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he took notice of the giant kelp forests ringing the islands. He believed that if those forests were destroyed, a significant number of species would be lost. These underwater ecosystems, Darwin believed, could be even more important than forests on land. (2018-03-14)

New evidence implicates humans in prehistoric animal extinctions
Research led by UK and Australian scientists sheds new light on the role that our ancestors played in the extinction of Australia's prehistoric animals. Their study suggests that the mass extinction of Tasmania's large prehistoric animals was the result of human hunting, and not climate change as previously believed. (2008-08-11)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 16P develop
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Arafura Sea and captured an image of newly developed Tropical Cyclone 16P. (2018-03-22)

It's not only size, but scales that matter in some male moth antennae
Male moths have evolved intricate scale arrangements on their antennae to enhance detection of female sex pheromones, which allows them to keep their antennae small enough to maximize flying, new research suggests. (2018-03-13)

The color of birds
New research provides insight into plumage evolution. (2016-11-03)

A classic Darwinian ecological hypothesis holds up -- with a twist
New University of Colorado Boulder-led research shows that a long-held hypothesis about the factors that govern species ranges largely holds true, but may be the result of a previously underappreciated ecological mechanism. (2017-12-25)

Galapagos study finds that new species can develop in as little as 2 generations
A study of Darwin's finches, which live on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific Ocean, has revealed direct genetic evidence that new species can arise in just two generations. (2017-11-23)

Thousands of turtles netted off South America
Tens of thousands of sea turtles are caught each year by small-scale fishers off South America's Pacific coast, new research shows. (2018-06-05)

Study shows PR best practices are only second best
Charles Marsh has studied economic experiments, evolutionary biology and philosophy to examine how indirect reciprocity, or cooperation without expectation of payment, is actually a better approach to public relations than the dominant competition-based approach. (2018-06-07)

Physical disability boosts parenting effort, beetles study shows
Animals that carry a physical impediment can work harder to rear their young as a result, an insect study has shown. They may behave this way in case they are not able to reproduce again, scientists suggest. (2018-03-22)

Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate change
New research finds that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C would save the majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change. Species across the globe would benefit -- particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia. Examples of animals to benefit include the critically endangered black rhinoceros. Reducing the risk to insects is important because they are vital for 'ecosystem services' such as pollinating crops and being part of the food chain. (2018-05-17)

The language of facial expressions
University of Miami Psychology Professor Daniel Messinger collaborated with researchers at Western University in Canada to show that our brains are pre-wired to perceive wrinkles around the eyes as conveying more intense and sincere emotions. (2018-06-11)

Fossils reveal diverse mesozoic pollinating lacewings
A research group led by professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology has provided new insight into the niche diversity, chemical communication, and defense mechanisms of Mesozoic pollinating insects. They reported 27 well-preserved kalligrammatids from late Cretaceous Burmese amber (99 Ma) and Chinese Early Cretaceous (125 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (165 Ma) compression rocks. (2018-09-17)

Mongooses inherit behavior from role models rather than parents
Young mongooses learn lifelong habits from role models rather than inheriting them from genetic parents, new research shows. (2018-05-24)

New study gives weight to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils'
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol studying the 'living fossil' Sphenodon -- or tuatara -- have identified a new way to measure the evolutionary rate of these enigmatic creatures, giving credence to Darwin's theory of 'living fossils.' (2017-02-22)

Expert unravels disease that took the hearing of world-famous painter
Francisco Goya is the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th century. In 1793, Goya, then 46, came down with a severe, undiagnosed illness. His hearing never returned. Now, a hearing expert has developed a diagnosis. She thinks Goya likely suffered from an autoimmune disease. (2017-04-28)

When music makes male faces more attractive
Women rate photographs of male faces more attractive and are more likely to date the men pictured when they have previously heard music. Moreover, highly arousing music led to the largest effect on sexual attraction. A team of psychologists led by Manuela Marin (University of Innsbruck) and Helmut Leder (University of Vienna) explains the significance of this finding in relation to the origins of music in their latest publication in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. (2017-09-13)

Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggs
An international team of researchers have discovered egg cases of deep-sea fish near hydrothermal vents. The team believes that deep-sea skates, a relative of sharks and rays, use the warm water near the vents to accelerate the typically years-long incubation time of their eggs. (2018-02-12)

Study solves puzzle of snail and slug feeding preferences
A study led by the University of Plymouth suggests the reason some seedlings are more commonly eaten by slugs and snails may be down to the smells produced by young seedlings in the early stages of their development. (2018-12-05)

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed in current malaria regimen
Current recommended dosing regimens for the most widely used treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for the most vulnerable populations of patients, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine, led by Professor Joel Tarning of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network and the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Network. (2018-06-12)

Tillage farming damaging earthworm populations, say scientists
The digging, stirring and overturning of soil by conventional ploughing in tillage farming is severely damaging earthworm populations around the world, say scientists. The findings published in Global Change Biology show a systematic decline in earthworm populations in soils that are ploughed every year. The deeper the soil is disturbed the more harmful it is for the earthworms. The scientists from University of Vigo and University College Dublin analyzed 215 studies from 40 countries dating back to 1950. (2017-05-08)

Stripes may be cool -- but they don't cool zebras down
Susanne Åkesson, a biologist at Lund University in Sweden, refutes the theory that zebras have striped fur to stay cool in the hot sun. That hypothesis is wrong, she and her colleagues show in a study recently published in Scientific Reports. (2018-07-06)

Mysteries of the primrose unraveled
Plant scientists at the University of East Anglia have succeeded in unraveling the complete genome sequence of the common primrose -- the plant whose reproductive biology captivated the Victorian naturalist Charles Darwin. The research team has identified, for the first time, the landscape of genes which operate within the primrose's two different flowering forms that are involved in the reproductive process. This adds fresh insight to a puzzle that scientists have been grappling with for over 150 years. (2018-12-18)

In enemy garb
Biologists expand on more than 150 years of textbook wisdom with a new explanation for wasp mimicry. (2017-02-24)

Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. The study of the finches of the Galapagos Islands could change the way conservation biologists think about species with naturally fragmented populations to understand their potential for extinction.  (2019-08-22)

New study of the world's smallest elephant
The world's smallest elephant species, the newly described Bornean elephant, will be the focus of a Cardiff University study in Sabah, Malaysia for the next three years. (2005-12-08)

2 explosive evolutionary events shaped early history of multicellular life
Scientists have known for some time that most major groups of complex animals appeared in the fossils record during the Cambrian Explosion, a seemingly rapid evolutionary event that occurred 542 million years ago. Now Virginia Tech paleontologists, using rigorous analytical methods, have identified another explosive evolutionary event that occurred about 33 million years earlier among macroscopic life forms unrelated to the Cambrian animals. (2008-01-03)

NASA Northern quadrant strength in Tropical Cyclone Lili
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in Tropical Cyclone Lili as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures. (2019-05-10)

Students' perceptions of Earth's age influence acceptance of human evolution, says U of Minn. study
High school and college students who understand the geological age of the Earth (4.5 billion years) are much more likely to understand and accept human evolution, according to a University of Minnesota study published in the March issue of the journal Evolution. (2010-03-10)

Pneumococcal vaccine does not appear to protect against pneumonia
Commonly used pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines do not appear to be effective for preventing pneumonia, found a study by a team of researchers from Switzerland and the United Kingdom. (2009-01-05)

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