Popular Data Collection News and Current Events

Popular Data Collection News and Current Events, Data Collection News Articles.
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Do children inherently want to help others?
A new special section of the journal Child Development includes a collection of ten empirical articles and one theoretical article focusing on the predictors, outcomes, and mechanisms related to children's motivations for prosocial actions, such as helping and sharing. (2016-11-22)

Regulating toxic chemicals for public and environmental health: A PLOS Biology collection
Over the past several decades thousands of new chemicals have been approved for commerce, even as evidence of their ability to cause serious harm has emerged. A new collection 'Challenges in Environmental Health: Closing the Gap between Evidence and Regulations' publishing Dec. 18-21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology examines the divide between evidence and policy. (2017-12-18)

Experts provide insights on the body's stress response during critical illness
Critical illness causes the body to initiate a stress response, which activates the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to increase the availability of the stress hormone cortisol. (2018-01-10)

Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination rates
A Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months. (2018-01-24)

Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica
The popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a study publishing on March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, by an international team lead by Steven L. Chown and Monash University scientists. (2017-03-28)

STAT2: Much more than an antiviral protein
A protein known for guarding against viral infections leads a double life, new research shows, and can interfere with cell growth and the defense against parasites. In a new paper publishing Oct. 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Johnathan Ho and Uwe Vinkemeier at the University of Nottingham, UK, and colleagues describe the duplicitous nature of this essential protein, called STAT2, which they discovered while investigating the mechanisms behind interferon signaling. (2016-10-25)

Launch of 'DeWorm3' collection
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases is happy to announce the publication of a new collection, 'DeWorm3' on Jan. 18, 2018. (2018-01-18)

Plant-derived volatiles may serve as future antifungals
A research team at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology has developed a novel screening method to identify antimicrobial properties of volatile substances. With this assay, they tested the vapour-phase-mediated activity of 175 essential oils (EOs) and 37 EO components. Approximately half of them proved active against the most drug-resistant type of Candida. (2018-03-09)

Fitness tracker data can enhance biomedical research and personalized health
In a research article publishing February 27 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Weng Khong Lim and colleagues from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Institute of Precision Medicine, Singapore, and the National Heart Centre Singapore show that wearable sensors are not only able to identify groups of volunteers with similar patterns of daily activity, but can also predict various markers of risk for cardiovascular diseases such as obesity, high blood pressure and high blood sugar. (2018-02-27)

A systems biology perspective on molecular cytogenetics
Professor Henry Heng's team, from the medical school at Wayne State University, has published a perspective article titled A Systems Biology Perspective on Molecular Cytogenetics to address the issue. In this article, they applied the genome theory to explain why cytogenetics/cytogenomics needs a systems biology perspective, while systems biology itself needs a cytogenetic/cytogenomic based platform, since genome context (karyotype) represents a new type of genomic coding. Such 'systems inheritance,' differing from gene defined 'parts inheritance,' is the genetic blueprint. (2017-01-27)

Hundreds of fossilized eggs sheds light on pterosaur development
An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs. (2017-11-30)

Do our mitochondria run at 50 degrees C?
A new study publishing Jan. 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by INSERM and CNRS researchers at Hôpital Robert Debré in Paris led by Dr. Pierre Rustin (and their international collaborators from Finland, South Korea, Lebanon and Germany) presents surprising evidence that mitochondria can run more than 10 degrees C hotter than the body's bulk temperature, and indeed are optimized to do so. (2018-01-25)

Scientists to build the avian tree of life
With the support of the National Science Foundation, scientists have embarked on a large-scale project to build the evolutionary tree of all bird species using cutting-edge technologies to collect DNA from across the genome. This project, called OpenWings, will produce the most complete evolutionary tree of any vertebrate group to-date. (2018-04-11)

Harbor porpoises on the decline in the German North Sea
The harbor porpoise population is declining in the German North Sea, according to a recent study which surveyed the species over a 20-year time period. Harbor porpoises are known as a ''sentinel species'' - animals which indicate the health of an ecosystem and point to potential risks (think of the canary in the coal mine) - and their decreasing numbers indicate the extent to which human activities have affected marine wildlife. (2021-01-07)

High salt intake associated with doubled risk of heart failure
High salt intake is associated with a doubled risk of heart failure, according to a 12-year study in more than 4 000 people presented today at ESC Congress. (2017-08-27)

New biomarkers for colorectal cancer
Researchers from the University of Luxembourg found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a patient's risk for recurrence of the disease. This supports the doctor in choosing the best-fitting treatment plan. (2018-01-11)

When should banks chase debts? New method could help them decide
Banks face financial risks and uncertainty when deciding when to chase consumers who default on their credit card payments and when to let them go. A new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin analyzes delinquent credit card user behaviors and develops a predictive model for sorting them into categories based on whether they are more or less likely to pay back their overdue debt. (2019-07-25)

Did Michelangelo include a hidden caricature of himself in one of his famous sketches?
A new Clinical Anatomy article presents evidence that Michelangelo inserted his self-portrait into a sketch of his close friend, Vittoria Colonna, which is currently in the collection of the British Museum in London, England. (2018-03-14)

Field Museum provides gold standard for mammal survey
Several mamalogists at Chicago's Field Museum participated in the IUCN survey of the world's mammals, using the Museum's extensive mammal collections for reference. (2008-10-06)

The perils of publishing location data for endangered species
While the increasing accessibility of data from scientific studies creates many benefits -- and represents a process that should be broadly embraced -- in the context of conserving endangered species it can actually be problematic, write David Lindenmayer and Ben Scheele in this Essay. (2017-05-25)

Warming climate shrinks British Columbia beetles
Some of B.C.'s beetles are shrinking as their habitats get warmer, according to new UBC research. The study provides evidence that climate change is affecting the size of organisms. (2018-01-30)

Gene editing just got easier
An international team of researchers has made CRISPR technology more accessible and standardized by simplifying its complex implementation in a way that offers a broad platform for off-the shelf genome engineering. (2018-06-08)

River shaping from floods happens in moderation
An assessment of rivers in the US suggests that although there is a relationship between increased flood size and erosion, the effect is most pronounced for moderate floods. (2016-05-05)

Maternal mortality rates are on the rise, but more accurate estimates are needed
A new Birth analysis has uncovered dramatic increases in the rates of maternal mortality -- the death of a mother during pregnancy, childbirth, or post-partum -- in Texas in recent years. There was an 87 percent increase when comparing 2011-2015 data with 2006-2010 data. Some of the increase is likely due to increased overreporting of maternal deaths due to errors in the data collection system, however. (2018-01-04)

Dual migration created genetic 'melting pot' of the first Scandinavians
New genomic data suggest that the first human settlers on the Scandinavian peninsula followed two distinct migration routes. The study publishing Jan. 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology led by researchers from Uppsala University with an international team of collaborators, also indicates that the resulting mixed population genetically adapted to the extreme environmental conditions. (2018-01-09)

New genetics clues into motor neuron disease
Researchers at the University of Queensland have contributed to the discovery of three new genes which increase the risk of motor neuron disease, opening the door for targeted treatments. (2016-07-25)

Scientists close in on method to fight deadly childhood cancer
Focusing on a gene known as ALK in human cell lines and tissue samples, scientists used a small-molecule inhibitor to block abnormalities that apparently cause neuroblastomas, a type of cancer responsible for 15 percent of all cancer deaths in children. (2008-10-15)

Neutron spectroscopy: New detector module MultiFLEXX increases count rate tenfold
The triple axis spectrometer FLEXX at BER II provides a new detector module for user service. It measures many angles and multiple energy transfers simultaneously and thus increases the amount of data measured per hour by about a factor of ten. This enables neutron users to make optimal use of their beam time. (2017-12-01)

RefEx, a web tool for a comfortable search of reference data for gene expression analysis
A large variety of data of life science (such as gene expression) is accumulated in the public database, but it is difficult to use. A web tool RefEx can easily search gene expression data available in public databases to obtain reference data for genetic analysis without bench-top experiments. RefEx is expected to contribute widely and greatly to life science and medical research as a powerful tool for gene expression research. (2017-11-03)

Learning from Mr. Spock: Gunderman examines sci-fi as social commentary
What if science fiction like the Star Trek series could teach us how to better understand and engage with the real world around us? That is the premise of a collection of scholarly articles written by five cultural researchers from around the country, including UT's Hannah Gunderman, a doctoral student in the Department of Geography. (2017-12-07)

Why some human genes are more popular with researchers than others
Historical bias is a key reason why biomedical researchers continue to study the same 10 percent of all human genes while ignoring many genes known to play roles in disease, according to a study publishing Sept. 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Thomas Stoeger and Luís Amaral of Northwestern University, and colleagues. This bias is bolstered by research funding mechanisms and social forces. (2018-09-18)

UK study shows cell signaling interaction may prevent key step in lung cancer progression
New findings from University of Kentucky faculty published in Scientific Reports reveals a novel cell signaling interaction that may prevent a key step in lung cancer progression. (2017-11-09)

Catching the right fish
ETH researchers have developed a method to examine millions of potential self-produced drug candidates in one go. (2018-03-28)

Marine exploration sensing with light and sound
Unveiling new strategies to improve future wireless underwater sensing networks for marine research and communication. (2018-03-12)

The CMAJ group: A home for patient-oriented research
Researchers who are conducting patient-oriented research, which engages patients in research to improve health and health care, may find a home for their research in CMAJ Open and CMAJ, announces an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), (2018-05-22)

Audit finds biodiversity data aggregators 'lose and confuse' data
Both online repositories the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) were found to 'lose and confuse' portions of the data provided to them, according to an independent audit of ca. 800,000 records from three Australasian museums. Genus and species names were found to have been changed in up to 1 in 5 records, and programming errors caused up to 100 percent data loss in some data categories. (2018-04-23)

How does the precision medicine initiative affect me?
The symposium session at the 2018 Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) Annual Meeting will address cutting edge risk communication, risk assessment and risk management issues with respect to precision medicine, addressing issues such as trust, governance, tort liability and data access and quality. (2018-12-04)

Improving the quality of high altitude medicine
Study location, exact altitude and a detailed profile of the study participants are just three of altogether 42 factors which are to be included in any future study, project description or publication related to high altitude medicine. A select group of experts, including high altitude physicians from all over the world, were invited to define which factors were most pertinent for inclusion in the guidelines by forming a consensus through multiple rounds of discussion. (2018-02-26)

Study reveals human body has gone through four stages of evolution
Research into 430,000-year-old fossils collected in northern Spain found that the evolution of the human body's size and shape has gone through four main stages, according to a paper published this week. (2015-08-31)

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps
In a recent study carried out by researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Germany and University of California, Davis, USA, the scientists explored to what extent camera trap data are suitable to assess subtle species interactions such as avoidance in space and time. The study is published in the international journal Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation. (2019-02-22)

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