Popular Dendritic Cells News and Current Events

Popular Dendritic Cells News and Current Events, Dendritic Cells News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. The finding highlights the value of targeting D-2HG to establish new therapeutic approaches against colorectal cancer. (2016-12-01)

Activated T-cells drive post-heart attack heart failure
Chronic inflammation after a heart attack can promote heart failure and death. University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have now shown that activated T-cells -- part of the immune system's inflammatory response -- are both necessary and sufficient to produce such heart failure. (2017-02-27)

Cholesterol-like molecules switch off the engine in cancer-targeting Natural Killer cells
The engine used by cancer-killing 'Natural Killer' cells is turned on by a protein called Srebp, which can be blocked by certain sterols like cholesterol. Tumor cells can produce oxysterols and cholesterol levels tend to be higher in people with obesity. (2017-09-18)

Molecular 'magnets' could improve cancer immunotherapy
Chemicals that attract specialised immune cells toward tumours could be used to develop better immunotherapies for cancer patients, according to new research published in Cell. Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered that immune cells called Natural Killer cells accumulate in tumours and release chemicals that attract specialised dendritic cells (cDC1) - white blood cells known for triggering anti-cancer immune responses - to the tumour. (2018-02-08)

UCR researchers propose minocycline as a promising drug for patients with Fragile X syndrome
A UC Riverside-led team of biomedical scientists has found that a readily available drug called minocycline, used widely to treat acne and skin infections, can be used to treat Fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. The study's findings have already impacted future therapies, with the approval of a new clinical trial in Toronto, Canada, that will test minocycline in patients with Fragile X. (2008-10-03)

Scientists use gene editing to eliminate viruses in live pigs
Scientists have edited the pig genome to deactivate a family of retroviruses. The results hold important implications for transplant medicine in humans. (2017-08-10)

Guards of the human immune system unraveled
Dendritic cells represent an important component of the immune system: they recognize and engulf invaders, which subsequently triggers a pathogen-specific immune response. Scientists of the University Hospital Erlangen of the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg and the LIMES Institute of the University of Bonn gained substantial knowledge of human dendritic cells, which might contribute to the development of immune therapies in the future. The results were recently published in the journal Science Immunology. (2016-12-16)

Moffitt researchers discover new approach to stimulate an immune response against tumor cells
A team of Moffitt Cancer Center researchers is trying to find new ways to further enhance the activity of the immune system against cancer. In an article published in the January issue of Cancer Cell, the researchers describe how a new type of immunotherapy drug targeting the protein TIM-3 works to stimulate the immune system. (2018-01-30)

U of M research discovers subcellular computations within the brain during decision-making
New University of Minnesota Medical School research suggests that during decision-making, neurons in the brain are capable of much more complex processing than previously thought. (2019-11-14)

Meth promotes spread of virus in HIV-infected users
Researchers at the University at Buffalo have presented the first evidence that the addictive drug methamphetamine, or meth, also commonly known as (2006-08-04)

Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect. (2019-04-11)

Graphene oxide nanosheets could help bring lithium-metal batteries to market
A nanosheet helps prevent formation of lithium dendrites in lithium-metal batteries. (2018-03-15)

Hepatitis C: A novel point-of-care assay
One of the major challenges identified by the WHO in efforts to eradicate the hepatitis C virus is the diagnosis of chronic cases that are generally asymptomatic. Major progress is required for new diagnostic techniques that can be 'decentralized,' in other words accessed by populations and countries with limited resources. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, in collaboration with the company genedrive, have developed and validated a rapid, reliable, point-of-care HCV assay. (2018-04-10)

New HSS study finds hope in understanding and better treating scleroderma
Researchers at HSS find a potential cause and treatment lead for scleroderma. (2018-01-10)

Short-term stress can affect learning and memory
Short-term stress lasting as little as a few hours can impair brain-cell communication in areas associated with learning and memory, University of California, Irvine researchers have found. (2008-03-11)

All pooped out -- this is how norovirus does it
Researchers have long sought to identify the cells in the gut that are susceptible to infection by norovirus, the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide -- and now one team has pinpointed the type of cell that falls victim. (2018-04-12)

Study explores emerging role of NAD+ in innate and adaptive immune responses
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have discovered a new cellular and molecular pathway that regulates CD4+ T cell response -- a finding that may lead to new ways to treat diseases that result from alterations in these cells. (2018-02-23)

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and Amsterdam UMC have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study, which are published in Nature Communications, are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders. (2018-11-02)

Physical activity prepares neurons to regenerate in case of spinal cord injury
The influence of an active lifestyle on the regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, that is, the set of cranial and spinal nerves that control motor and sensory functions, is described here for the first time, explains Ángel Barco, who has led the participation of the Institute of Neurosciences UMH-CSIC, in Alicante, in this international study. (2019-04-10)

Heart derived stem cells develop into heart muscle
Dutch researchers at University Medical Center Utrecht and the Hubrecht Institute have succeeded in growing large numbers of stem cells from adult human hearts into new heart muscle cells. A breakthrough in stem cell research. Until now, it was necessary to use embryonic stem cells to make this happen. The findings are published in the latest issue of the journal Stem Cell Research. (2008-04-23)

New key regulator of acquisition of immune tolerance to tumor cells in cancer patients
Researchers of the Chromatin and Disease Group from the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) in Barcelona have identified a distinctive epigenetic event in immune cells that differentiate in the tumoral microenvironment and make them tolerant to cancer cells. (2017-10-03)

The brain learns completely differently than we've assumed since the 20th century
Based on experimental evidence physicists publish revolutionary new theory on brain learning that contradicts the most common assumption in neuroscience, will transform our understanding of brain function, and open new horizons for advanced deep learning algorithms. (2018-03-23)

Alzheimer's drug repairs brain damage after alcohol binges in rodents
A drug used to slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease could offer clues on how drugs might one day be able to reverse brain changes that affect learning and memory in teens and young adults who binge drink. (2018-02-15)

New methods identify and manipulate 'newborn' cells in animal model of Parkinson's disease
A research team from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Lund University in Sweden used an engineered virus to deliver a protein that glows green when exposed to blue light (green fluorescent protein) into newborn cells of the striatum in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. (2008-09-03)

Marrow-derived stem cells deliver new cytokine to kill brain tumor cells, offer protection
Gliomas are highly invasive brain tumors with poorly defined borders. Cancer cells separate from the main tumor and migrate to form satellites that escape treatment and often lead to recurrence. An article in the March 1, 2006 issue of Cancer Research reports on an animal study in which bone-marrow derived neural stem cells and a newly discovered cytokine worked synergistically to track and kill glioma cells and offer long-term protection. (2006-03-01)

Investigating the enigmatic link between periodontal inflammation and retinal degeneration
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Hyun Hong, The Dental College of Georgia at Augusta University, presented a poster titled 'Investigating the Enigmatic Link Between Periodontal Inflammation and Retinal Degeneration.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future. (2019-01-04)

Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice. Ketamine treatment restored lost dendritic spines and rescued coordinated neural activity in the Prefrontal Cortex of the mice -- findings that may help researchers develop interventions that promote lasting remission of depression in humans. The study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-04-11)

Healthy blood vessels may prevent fat growth
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers report that the cells lining blood vessels may perform an unsuspected task -- controlling the development of fat cells. Their findings are reported in the September issue of the journal Stem Cells. (2008-09-22)

Probiotic bacteria can induce monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturation?
Probiotic bacteria are defined as living microorganisms that have beneficial effects on human health. The mechanisms behind these actions are not yet fully characterized. A group in Finland investigated the capacity of nine probiotic bacteria to induce the maturation and the production of cytokines in human dendritic cells. The ability to induce cytokine production in leukocytes may exemplify one of the health promoting effects of probiotic bacteria. (2008-09-24)

Quest for new medicines could be helped by cell discovery
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have made a key discovery that could speed up the production of cells in the lab for studying diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease. (2017-11-27)

Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection
The HIV virus increases the potency of the tuberculosis bacterium (Mtb) by affecting a central function of the immune system. This is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden. The discovery helps to explain why infection with HIV greatly increases the risk that infection by Mtb will progress to active tuberculosis. (2016-10-18)

Autism-linked gene stunts developing dendrites
Increased expression of a gene linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) leads to a remodeling of dendrites during brain development, according to a new study conducted in cultured neurons and an ASD mouse model published in JNeurosci. The research identifies a series of cellular and molecular events that may contribute to differences in neuronal connectivity that underlie the social and communication deficits observed in autism. (2017-12-04)

Boosting cancer therapy with cross-dressed immune cells
Researchers at EPFL have created artificial molecules that can help the immune system to recognize and attack cancer tumors. The study is published in Nature Methods. (2018-01-22)

Abnormalities in a protein affecting how nerve cells change shape
Amsterdam, NL, April 3, 2019 - Since 1993, when the gene that causes Huntington's disease (HD) was identified, there has been intense focus on understanding how this genetic mutation causes the disease's severe progressive neural deterioration. (2019-04-03)

Tracking down T cell targets to tamp down HIV infection
Scientists have narrowed in on a group of gut-residing immune cells that might predispose women to increased HIV infection risk and more severe disease. (2018-01-24)

UIC researchers create heart cells to study AFib
University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered a way turn pluripotent stem cells into atrial cells. The discovery will enable them to better study atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. (2018-05-03)

Fetal immune system rejects the mother in preterm labor
Preterm labor, a common pregnancy complication, has long been a mystery to scientists. But a new study from UC San Francisco shows it may sometimes happen when the fetal immune system 'wakes up' too early and begins to reject the mother, causing the uterus to start contracting. (2018-04-25)

Cancer vaccines need to target T cells that can persist in the long fight against cancer
Cancer vaccines may need to better target T cells that can hold up to the long fight against cancer, scientists report. Studies of two T cell types that are equally activated by alpha-fetoprotein, a well-established antigen made by liver cancer, show that while one starts off with a bang, the other endures as the more powerful tumor fighter. (2017-09-25)

New cancer vaccine shows early promise for patients with HER2-positive cancers
Treatment with a HER2-targeted therapeutic cancer vaccine provided clinical benefit to several patients with metastatic HER2-positive cancers who had not previously been treated with a HER2-targeted therapeutic, according to data from a phase I clinical trial presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3. (2018-09-30)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.