Popular Dengue Virus News and Current Events

Popular Dengue Virus News and Current Events, Dengue Virus News Articles.
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Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why. (2019-03-06)

Researchers reveal genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19
HSE University researchers have become the first in the world to discover genetic predisposition to severe COVID-19. The results of the study were published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. http://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.641900 (2021-02-23)

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment. (2018-10-05)

Mayo discovery means individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapies
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway -- thought to be defective in cancer -- is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. This discovery enabled researchers to develop an algorithm to predict treatment effectiveness in individual patients. The findings appear in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2018-05-16)

BU study: Diagnosing Ebola before symptoms arrive
Boston University researchers studied data from 12 monkeys exposed to Ebola virus, and discovered a common pattern of immune response among the ones that got sick. This response occurred four days before the onset of fever -- the first observable symptom of infection. The work, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, suggests a possible biomarker for early diagnosis of the disease. (2018-03-28)

New test extends window for accurate detection of zika
Diagnosis of Zika infection is complex. Molecular tests for exposure are only reliable in the first two to three weeks after infection. Antibody tests are confounded by cross-reactivity of antibodies to Zika with similar viruses like dengue and yellow fever. A new blood test called ZIKV-NS2B-concat ELISA is faster, less expensive, and extends the window of accurate detection to months after onset of infection, giving clinicians a powerful tool to screen for Zika throughout pregnancy. (2018-03-06)

Researchers identify chemical compound that inhibits Ebola virus replication
An organic chemical compound shows effective antiviral activity against Ebola virus and several other viruses, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-03-28)

Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells. (2018-01-31)

Potential biomarkers in animals could signal Ebola virus infection before symptoms appear
Scientists have identified potential biomarkers in nonhuman primates exposed to Ebola virus (EBOV) that appeared up to four days before the onset of fever, according to research published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The work, a collaboration between the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and Boston University (BU), could pave the way for developing diagnostic tools to identify EBOV infection in humans even before symptoms appear. (2018-03-28)

Zika vaccine shows promise for treating deadly brain cancer
An international team of researchers has successfully deployed a Zika virus vaccine to target and kill human glioblastoma brain cancer stem cells, which had been transplanted into mice. In a study published this week in mBio®, the team shows that a live, attenuated version of the Zika virus could form the basis of a new treatment option for this fatal brain cancer. (2018-09-18)

Tool encoded in coronaviruses provides a potential target for COVID-19
Coronaviruses exploit our cells so they can make copies of themselves inside us. (2021-02-23)

How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?
Scientists from UTMB and Biomed Protection predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season. The results published suggest that the current flu vaccine will work better during the 2018 US flu season than the 2017 Australian flu season. (2017-12-13)

HIV spreads through direct cell-to-cell contact
The spread of pathogens like the HI virus is often studied in a test tube, i.e. in two-dimensional cell cultures, even though it hardly reflects the much more complex conditions in the human body. Using novel cell culture systems, quantitative image analysis, and computer simulations, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Heidelberg University has now explored how HIV spreads in three-dimensional tissue-like environments. (2019-07-25)

Morris Animal Foundation study identifies new virus in cat
Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from the University of Sydney have found a previously undiscovered hepadnavirus in an immunocompromised cat, and subsequently in banked samples. The research team published their results today in the prestigious journal Viruses. (2018-05-17)

Using viruses to fight viruses: New approach eliminates 'dormant' HIV-infected cells
Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered that the Maraba virus, or MG1, can target and destroy the kind of HIV-infected cells that standard antiretroviral therapies can't reach. This laboratory discovery was published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. If this technique works in humans, it might possibly contribute to a cure for HIV. (2017-12-18)

Family impact of congenital Zika syndrome likely to last a lifetime
The impact of congenital Zika syndrome on families will be substantial and will last a lifetime, given its severity and uncertainty about long-term outcomes for infants. (2018-02-01)

HIV vaccine design should adapt as HIV virus mutates
Researchers from UAB, Emory and Microsoft demonstrate that HIV has evolved to be pre-adapted to the immune response, worsening clinical outcomes in newly infected patients. (2016-05-16)

How highly contagious norovirus infection gets its start
Researchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Noroviruses tucked inside tuft cells are effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These 'healthy carriers' are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evades detection in such people could lead to better ways to prevent outbreaks. (2018-04-12)

Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy
This study is the first to report a possible mechanism for the enhancement of Zika virus progression during pregnancy in an animal model. (2019-02-08)

Penn team shows how seemingly acute viral infections can persist
Led by Carolina López of the University of Pennsylvania, a multi-disciplinary research team has resolved a paradox of viral infection. They've identified how a viral product can both trigger an immune response aimed at eliminating the virus or, conversely, allow the virus to survive and persist. (2017-10-06)

People of Black and Asian ethnicity up to twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 as those of White ethnicity
People of Black ethnicity are twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 compared to those of White ethnicity. People from Asian backgrounds are 1.5 times more likely to become infected with the virus compared to White individuals. Those of Asian ethnicities may be at higher risk of admission to an intensive therapy unit (ITU) and death. (2020-11-12)

NIH scientists discover that defective HIV DNA can encode HIV-related proteins
Investigators from the National Institutes of Health have discovered that cells from HIV-infected people whose virus is suppressed with treatment harbor defective HIV DNA that can nevertheless be transcribed into a template for producing HIV-related proteins. This finding may affect scientists' understanding of the long-term effects of HIV infection and what a cure would require. (2016-07-18)

Birds become immune to influenza
An influenza infection in birds gives a good protection against other subtypes of the virus, like a natural vaccination, according to a new study. (2017-06-30)

New coronavirus emerges from bats in China, devastates young swine
A newly identified coronavirus that killed nearly 25,000 piglets in 2016-17 in China emerged from horseshoe bats near the origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which emerged in 2002 in the same bat species. The new virus, called swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), doesn't appear to infect people, unlike SARS-CoV. The NIAID-funded work was a collaboration among scientists from EcoHealth Alliance, Duke-NUS Medical School, Wuhan Institute of Virology and other organizations. (2018-04-04)

Tumor-killing virus selectively targets diseased brain cells
New findings show that a specialized virus with the ability to reproduce its tumor-killing genes can selectively target tumors in the brains of mice and eliminate them. Healthy brain tissue remained virtually untouched, according to a Feb. 20 report in the Journal of Neuroscience. With more research, the technique could one day offer a novel way of treating brain cancer in humans. (2008-02-19)

Clinical trial shows therapeutic HIV vaccination doesn't lead to viral suppression
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial found no benefit for a therapeutic HIV vaccine, but could offer researchers much needed insights for future cure efforts. (2017-12-06)

Viral probe gives ringside view of cell-to-cell combat
A fascinating blow-by-blow account of the arms struggle between plants and viral pathogens, is revealed in new research. (2018-01-23)

For the first time in humans, Zika syndrome susceptibility linked to genetic background
About 6 percent to 12 percent of the babies born from mothers infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy will have the CZS. (2018-02-02)

ID'ing features of flu virus genome may help target surveillance for pandemic flu
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified features of the influenza virus genome that affect how well the virus multiplies. These features are similar but not identical across viral strains. It's possible that the extent of similarity between strains influences whether two flu viruses can mix their genetic material to make a hybrid virus with the potential to explode into pandemic flu. (2018-01-31)

Are American Zika strains more virulent than Pacific and Asian strains?
Over recent years, Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread eastward from Africa and Asia, leading to an epidemic in the Americas. Now, researchers comparing American, Pacific and Southeast Asian subtypes of the virus in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have concluded that the American-subtype strain has the highest ability to grow both in vitro and in vivo. (2019-06-06)

Annual influenza vaccination does not prevent natural immunity
Earlier studies have suggested that having repeated annual influenza vaccination can prevent natural immunity to the virus, and potentially increase the susceptibility to influenza illness in the event of a pandemic, or when the vaccine does not 'match' the virus circulating in the community. But now, researchers at the Influenza Center in Bergen have published a study, which concludes that annual influenza vaccination does not increase susceptibility to influenza infection in years of vaccine mismatch. (2017-11-13)

How the immune system remembers viruses
For a person to acquire immunity to a disease, T cells must develop into memory cells after contact with the pathogen. Until now, the number of cells that do this was believed to depend above all on the magnitude of the initial immune response. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now called this into question. (2020-11-02)

MRIs of West Nile virus victims -- even symptom-free -- show evidence of long-term neurological damage
Brain images of people who developed neurological complications from West Nile virus found that many of them -- including those who had experienced mild symptoms or none all -- showed evidence of brain damage years after the original infection, according to a new study presented today at the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). (2017-11-07)

How the human immune system protects against Ebola
'The current approach for treatment of filovirus infections with antibody cocktails tested in animal models utilizes the principle of targeting of non-overlapping epitopes. Our study suggests that possible synergistic effects of antibodies which block various steps of viral replication should be also considered.' (2018-08-23)

New research reveals how one antibody blocks dangerous effects of dengue virus infection, offering a potential path to prevention
A team of researchers has discovered an antibody that blocks the ability of the dengue virus to cause disease in mice. The findings open the potential for developing effective treatments and designing a vaccine for dengue and similar diseases. (2021-01-07)

Mesothelin engineered on virus-like particles provides treatment clues for pancreatic cancer
New understanding of a protein that spurs the growth of pancreatic cancer could lead to a new vaccine against the deadly disease, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in a report appearing in the current edition of the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. (2008-02-15)

False beliefs about MMR vaccine found to influence acceptance of Zika vaccine
People's willingness to use a Zika vaccine, once it's available, will be influenced by how they weigh the risks associated with the disease and the vaccine, but also by their misconceptions about other vaccines. (2018-03-15)

University of Waterloo develops new way to fight HIV transmission
Scientists at the University of Waterloo have developed a new tool to protect women from HIV infection. (2018-04-16)

CSU team uncovers potential for Rift Valley fever virus transmission in Colorado livestock
Colorado State University researchers found that mosquitoes that could transmit the virus were abundant in feedlots and at nearby sites in Northern Colorado. (2019-08-12)

Horses get the flu, too
Flu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that's safe and more protective than existing vaccines. Proactively preventing the spread of flu in animals is important, as animals are the most likely source of future human pandemics. Animals can be infected with multiple influenza viruses and have the potential to act as 'mixing vessels,' generating new strains that could infect people. (2018-04-30)

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