Popular Desertification News and Current Events

Popular Desertification News and Current Events, Desertification News Articles.
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Economic rewards of better land management: Estimated 2.3 billion tons of crops worth $1.4 trillion
Adopting proven sustainable land management practices could raise world crop supplies by an estimated 2.3 billion tonnes, worth $1.4 trillion, experts say in a study being released at a major global desertification conference. Conducted by the international Economics of Land Degradation initiative, the scientific interim report says land's economic value (2013-09-24)

Desertification and monsoon climate change linked to shifts in ice volume and sea level
The East Asian summer monsoon and desertification in Eurasia is driven by fluctuating Northern Hemisphere ice volume and global sea level during the Ice Age, as shown in a study published in Nature Communications. Today, two thirds of the world's population is dependent on agriculture sustained by rains of the East Asian summer monsoon, and future climate change in this region can therefore have a major impact on global food production. (2018-03-07)

Study predicts a significantly drier world at 2ºC
New research predicts a significantly drier world if global warming reaches 2ºC. Over a quarter of the world's land could become significantly drier and the change would cause an increased threat of drought and wildfires. Limiting warming to under 1.5ºC would dramatically reduce the fraction of the Earth's surface that undergoes such changes. Areas which would most benefit from keeping warming below 1.5ºC include Central America, Southern Europe, Southern Australia, parts of South East Asia, and Southern Africa. (2018-01-01)

Cocaine and ecstasy detected in waters of the L'Albufera in Valencia
The water in the canals and irrigation channels in the L'Albufera Natural Park in Valencia contain cocaine, ecstasy and a further six drugs. This has been confirmed by a study carried out by researchers from the University of Valencia, who have issued a warning about the continued presence of these substances on wildlife and human health. (2010-09-22)

Life under extreme drought conditions
The core region of the Atacama Desert is one of the most arid places on earth. However, scientists have found microorganisms there. But it has remained unclear whether these environments support active microbial growth or whether the observed cells were introduced by wind transport and subsequently degraded. Detailed analyses show: Even in the most arid zones of the Atacama a microbial community exists which becomes metabolically active following episodic increase in moisture after rainfalls. (2018-02-26)

Who is the chief culprit of dust concentrations over East Asia?
Compared with the Taklimakan Desert, the Gobi Desert located between China and Mongolia is the dominant contributor to the East Asian dust concentrations. (2017-09-08)

Bacteria under your feet
In cooperation with Universidad Rey Juan Carlos - URJC An international team of researchers, including ERC grantee Fernando T. Maestre from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), pieced together a global atlas of soil bacteria. The study, published today in Science, identifies some five hundred species of dominant bacteria living in soils worldwide. The findings, based on EU-funded research, could open new paths to improve soil fertility and increase agricultural production. (2018-01-18)

Overgrazing turning parts of Mongolian Steppe into desert
Overgrazing by millions of sheep and goats is the primary cause of degraded land in the Mongolian Steppe, one of the largest remaining grassland ecosystems in the world, researchers say in a new report. The degraded land holds implications both for local food production and global climate. (2013-09-05)

Re-thinking 'tipping points' in ecosystems and beyond
Abrupt environmental changes, known as regime shifts, are the subject of new research in which shows how small environmental changes trigger slow evolutionary processes that eventually precipitate collapse. (2020-03-02)

Nutrient-recycling microbes may feel the heat
While microbial communities are the engines driving the breakdown of dead plants and animals, little is known about whether they are equipped to handle big changes in climate. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sydney Glassman at UC Riverside and colleagues examine what happens after microbial communities move into new climate conditions. The study is a first step toward understanding the vulnerability of these ecosystems to climate change. (2018-11-05)

38 percent of world's surface in danger of desertification
A team of Spanish researchers has measured the degradation of the planet's soil using the Life Cycle Assessment, a scientific methodology that analyses the environmental impact of human activities, and which now for the first time includes indicators on desertification. The results show that 38 percent of the world is made up of arid regions at risk of desertification. (2010-02-09)

Previous findings on tropical forest restoration were biased
What we think we know about how to restore tropical forests is based on shaky science. Missouri Botanical Garden Scientist Leighton Reid and other researchers reviewed major studies that had found natural regeneration was as good as or better than tree planting, and found those studies to be biased. Natural regeneration was studied in more resilient sites than tree planting, making it an apples to oranges comparison. This means there is no one-size-fits-all solution to forest restoration. (2018-05-16)

The microworm of Jaén whose males have no penis
In the most arid areas where there is little to no water, there live nematodes of no more than 1 mm which feed on bacteria and help to mineralise soil and produce nutrients. In an orchard of Jaén a new species has appeared with a feature that makes them unique on the Iberian Peninsula: the males lack the copulatory organ. (2017-03-01)

Breakthrough made in assessing marine phytoplankton health
Researchers from Oregon State University, NASA and other organizations said today that they have succeeded for the first time in measuring the physiology of marine phytoplankton through satellite measurements of its fluorescence -- an accomplishment that had been elusive for years. (2009-05-28)

Glaciers provide clues to combat desertification
Understanding how bacteria help convert glacier bedrock into soil could help address desertification. (2018-03-06)

Plants might be helping each other more than thought
Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones -- and thrive as a result. (2019-11-13)

New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resources
The World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures. (2018-06-21)

MIT team describes unique cloud forest
Trees that live in an odd desert forest in Oman have found an unusual way to water themselves by extracting moisture from low-lying clouds, MIT scientists report. (2006-09-14)

Why Tehran is sinking dangerously
Researchers from the Remote Sensing Section of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam used data from radar satellites to measure the subsidence of the Earth's surface in the Tehran region in Iran. They found out that between 2003 and 2017 three areas sank there with rates of sometimes more than 25 centimetres per year, and several meters in total. For the first time, this study traces in detail the subsidence in this region over a longer period of time. (2018-12-06)

Secondhand smoke: Nations producing less greenhouse gas most vulnerable to climate change
A new study by University of Queensland and WCS shows a dramatic global mismatch between nations producing the most greenhouse gases and the ones most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. (2016-02-05)

Lung doctors expect respiratory diseases will worsen with global climate change
Worldwide increases in the incidences of asthma, allergies, infectious and cardiovascular diseases will result from a variety of impacts of global climate change, including rising temperatures, worsening ozone levels in urban areas, the spread of desertification, and expansions of the ranges of communicable diseases as the planet heats up, the professional organization representing respiratory and airway physicians stated in a new position paper released today. (2012-03-15)

Did humans create the Sahara desert?
New research investigating the transition of the Sahara from a lush, green landscape 10,000 years ago to the arid conditions found today, suggests that humans may have played an active role in its desertification. (2017-03-14)

Analysis fingers causes of desertification
A meta-analysis published in the September 2004 issue of BioScience concludes that desertification is driven by a limited group of core variables, most prominently climatic factors that lead to reduced rainfall, technological factors, institutional and policy factors, and economic factors. These factors, the analysis shows, drive proximate causes of desertification such as the expansion of cropland and overgrazing, the extension of infrastructure, increased aridity, and wood extraction. (2004-09-01)

Using an embryonic pause to save the date
A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment. (2019-07-08)

The power of one country to influence treaty ratification
New research shows just how powerful the United States' and other countries' influence can be on persuading other nations to ratify international treaties. The first-of-its-kind study shows the influence of countries in treaty ratification can extend beyond their close allies and could even help persuade rivals to join agreements. (2019-03-07)

Scientists discover unlikely culprit for fertilizing North Pacific Ocean: Asian dust
The vast subtropical 'gyres' -- large systems of rotating currents in the middle of the oceans -- cover 40% of the Earth's surface and have long been considered biological deserts with stratified waters that contain very little nutrients to sustain life. (2019-06-10)

Climate change to continue to year 3000 in best case scenarios
New research indicates the impact of rising CO2 levels in the Earth's atmosphere will cause unstoppable effects to the climate for at least the next 1,000 years. (2011-01-09)

Baylor researcher finds first-ever evidence of climate change in ancient Northern China
Using a relatively new scientific dating technique, a Baylor University geologist and a team of international researchers were able to document -- for the first time -- a drastic climate change 4,200 years ago in northern China that affected vegetation and led to mass migration from the area. (2015-02-17)

Photovoltaics industry can help meet Paris agreement targets
To meet the Paris Agreement's goal of preventing Earth's average temperature from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial level, one of the best options for the energy economy will involve a shift to 100% renewable energy using solar energy and other clean energy sources. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers describe a model developed to predict what is necessary for the solar industry to meet Paris Agreement targets. (2020-10-27)

Holocene changes of landforms and environments in the eastern portion of Asian mid-latitude deserts
Based on careful field investigation over decades and geochronological and paleoenvironmental data, Professor Xiaoping Yang of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou and his collaborators from several institutions jointly studied the Holocene histories of the sand seas and sandy lands in the eastern portion of the desert belt in northern China. (2019-04-23)

New perspective: Vegetation phenology variability based on tibetan plateau tree-ring data
Recently, a research group headed by Prof. YANG Bao from the Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with coauthors from Russia, Germany, Canada and Sweden, has reconciled these conflicting results based on a 55-year series of vegetation phenology for the TP derived from well-validated process-based Vaganov-Shashkin model (V-S) simulations of tree-ring growth data. (2017-06-20)

AGU journal highlights for April 16, 2012
Featured in this release are research papers on the following topics: (2012-04-16)

Environmental scientist's early warning indicators win the prize
Promising environmental researcher David Seekell has been awarded a prestigious prize: the Science and SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists. He was awarded the prize for his dissertation at Umeå University that developed early warning indicators for environmental tipping points practically usable to government officials and landowners. (2016-12-02)

Himalyan ice cores reveal climate warming, catastrophic drought
Ice cores drilled through a glacier four miles up in the Himalayan Mountains have yielded a highly detailed record of the last 1,000 years of earth's climate in the high Tibetan Plateau. The cores show both the last decade and the last 50 years were the warmest in 1,000 years. (2000-09-14)

Greater desertification control using sand trap simulations
In the fight against desertification, so-called straw checkerboard barriers (SCB) play a significant role. SCB consists of half -exposed criss-crossing rows of straws of wheat, rice, reeds, and other plants. The trouble is that our understanding of the laws governing wind-sand movement in SCB and their surrounding area is insufficient. Now, researchers in China have performed a numerical simulation of the sand movement inside the SCB, described in a paper just published in EPJ E. (2013-09-27)

More water for life
Water is the life-blood of agriculture; it is the liquid elixir that nurtures the growth of billions of hectares of crops needed to feed the world. The ample supply of water for farming and agriculture often means the difference between feast and famine. Many parts of the world, however, suffer from the opposite -- the growing scarcity of water available for agriculture. (2010-03-22)

Ages of the Navajo Sandstone
The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye could see, where dinosaurs and small mammals roamed southern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is known for its beautiful red and tan crossbedded sandstones that grace many of the national parks and monuments in the southwest USA -- for example Arches, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, and Zion national parks. (2019-09-09)

Millennium Ecosystem Assessment: Many of 2 billion dryland dwellers at risk as land degrades
Growing desertification worldwide threatens to swell by millions the number of poor forced to seek new homes and livelihoods. And a rising number of large, intense dust storms plaguing many areas menace the health of people even continents away, international experts warn in a new report. (2005-06-16)

Diverse ecosystems are crucial climate change buffer
Preserving diverse plant life will be crucial to buffer the negative effects of climate change and desertification in in the world's drylands, according to a new landmark study. (2012-01-12)

Pollution in Northern Hemisphere helped cause 1980s African drought
Air pollution in the Northern Hemisphere in the mid-20th century cooled the upper half of the planet and pushed rain bands south, contributing to the prolonged and worsening drought in Africa's Sahel region. Clean air legislation in the 1980s reversed the trend and the drought lessened. (2013-06-06)

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