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Popular Dietary Fiber News and Current Events, Dietary Fiber News Articles.
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Poor rural population had best diet and health in mid-Victorian years
Poor, rural societies retaining a more traditional lifestyle where high-quality foods were obtained locally enjoyed the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain. A new study, published in JRSM Open, examined the impact of regional diets on the health of the poor during mid-19th century Britain and compared it with mortality data over the same period. (2018-03-08)

Blueberry and green tea containing supplement protects against stroke damage
A unique dietary supplement of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3 and carnosine -- developed to encourage proliferation of adult stem cells with potential to develop into most tissues and bone cells and the capacity to migrate toward damaged areas -- has been shown to have beneficial effects following experimental stroke in laboratory animals. Tests showed that in animals given NutraStem, stroke-damaged brains developed significant numbers of new neurons over those not receiving the supplement. (2008-03-04)

3-D-written model to provide better understanding of cancer spread
Purdue researcher Luis Solorio has helped create a lifelike cancer environment out of polymer to better predict how drugs might stop its course. (2018-03-02)

Montana State University researchers publish study
'Fruit and vegetable desirability is lower in more rural built food environments of Montana, USA using the Produce Desirability(ProDes) Tool' was published in the journal Food Security. (2018-03-23)

High-fiber diets, with aid from gut microbes, can help treat type 2 diabetes
Scientists have identified a 'guild' of gut bacteria that helped alleviate symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients eating a high-fiber diet. The authors say that promoting this exclusive microbial group via personalized nutrition may serve as a novel approach for maintaining the beneficial relationship between the body and its microbiome during T2DM. (2018-03-08)

Strong carbon fiber artificial muscles can lift 12,600 times their own weight
Some Illinois researchers working on artificial muscles are seeing results even the fittest individuals would envy, designing muscles capable of lifting up to 12,600 times their own weight. Assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering Sameh Tawfick, Beckman postdoctoral fellow Caterina Lamuta, and Simon Messelot recently published a study on how to design super strong artificial muscles in the journal Smart Material and Structures. The new muscles are made from carbon fiber-reinforced siloxane rubber and have a coiled geometry. (2018-04-17)

Chip-based sensors with incredible sensitivity
In London's St. Paul's Cathedral, a whisper can be heard far across the circular whispering gallery as the sound curves around the walls. Now, an optical whispering gallery mode resonator developed by Penn State electrical engineers can spin light around the circumference of a tiny sphere millions of times, creating an ultrasensitive microchip-based sensor for multiple applications. (2017-11-02)

0.6% soy isoflavone in the diet decrease muscle atrophy
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered a means of reducing muscle atrophy by the addition of the soy-derived isoflavone aglycone (AglyMax) to the diet of mice. This attenuation by soy isoflavone is attributable to block the apoptosis-dependent pathway in muscle fiber. The AglyMax supplement also anticipate to attenuate age-related muscle loss, sarcopenia. (2018-01-18)

How to decrease the mass of aircrafts
Members of the Department of Chemistry of Lomonosov Moscow State University have created unique polymer matrices for polymer composites based on novel phthalonitrile monomers. The developed materials possess higher strength than metals, which helps to sufficiently decrease the mass of aircraft parts that operate at high temperatures. (2017-02-08)

Healthy diet can ease symptoms of depression
An analysis of data from almost 46,000 people has found that weight loss, nutrient boosting and fat reduction diets can all reduce the symptoms of depression. Dr Joseph Firth, an Honorary Research fellow at The University of Manchester and Research Fellow at NICM Health Research Institute at Western Sydney University, says existing research has been unable to definitively establish if dietary improvement could benefit mental health. (2019-02-05)

Smokers have worse diets than non-smokers
Smokers have worse quality diets than former smokers or non-smokers, according to a study published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health. (2018-04-03)

New study highlights benefits of weekly nutrition classes to improve type 2 diabetes
Prescriptions are not enough -- diet changes and nutrition education make the difference in people with diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (2018-04-06)

Jurassic diet: Why our knowledge of what ancient pterosaurs ate might be wrong
Research reveals knowledge of prehistoric diets is often based on outdated ideas and could be inaccurate. (2018-06-07)

New laser achieves wavelength long sought by laser developers
Researchers at the University of Bath, United Kingdom have created a new kind of laser capable of pulsed and continuous mid-infrared emission between 3.1 and 3.2 microns, a spectral range that has long presented a major challenge for laser developers. The achievement could aid in the development of new uses for mid-IR lasers, which are currently used in applications such as spectroscopy, environmental sensing and detecting explosives. (2016-02-29)

Study shows that a high protein intake in early childhood is associated with higher body fat mass but not higher lean mass
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal, May 17-20, shows that a high intake of protein in early childhood, particularly from animal food sources, is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) due to increased body fat and not increases in fat-free mass. (2017-05-19)

Antibacterial combination could fight drug-resistant tuberculosis
Pairing the antibiotic ceftazidime with the enzyme inhibitor avibactam may be an effective treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis, a new study reports. This antibacterial drug combination -- already in clinical use for Gram-negative bacterial infections -- could aid in stemming the growing global drug-resistant tuberculosis crisis. (2017-08-30)

Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility
A new study of mice by scientists at the University of Illinois raises concerns about the potential impact that long-term exposure to genistein prior to conception may have on fertility and pregnancy. The study was conducted by food science and human nutrition professor William G. Helferich, comparative biosciences professor Jodi A. Flaws, Illinois alumna Shreya Patel and animal sciences research specialist James A. Hartman. (2017-11-14)

FDA independence in an age of partisan politics
Unlike other federal agencies, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) -- the oldest federal consumer protection agency -- has been increasingly subjected to creeping politicization and a progressive loss of independence under the glare of partisan politics. (2019-05-16)

Canadians' consumption of fruit and vegetables drops 13 per cent in 11 years
Two surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13-per-cent decrease in the amount of fruit and vegetables being consumed by Canadians, new University of British Columbia research has found. And while consumption of milk and dairy products also declined during the study period between 2004 and 2015, Canadians were eating more meat and alternatives in 2015 than they were a decade earlier. (2019-03-08)

Making the switch to polarization diversity
New silicon photonic chip that offers significant improvement to the optical switches used by fiber optic networks to be presented at OFC 2017 in Los Angeles. (2017-01-31)

Study shows magnesium optimizes vitamin D status
A randomized trial by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers indicates that magnesium optimizes vitamin D status, raising it in people with deficient levels and lowering it in people with high levels. (2018-12-14)

In-depth mineral review provides foundational resource for dairy scientists
Life is dependent on minerals. Accordingly, the diets of animals must contain certain minerals in both large amounts, via marcrominerals, and small amounts, via microminerals. In a thorough and wide-ranging review published in the Journal of Dairy ScienceĀ®, Jesse Goff, DVM, PhD, professor and Anderson Chair in Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University, examined necessary minerals as well as the mechanisms for their absorption in cows, providing insight into these vital elements. (2018-03-01)

Dementia can be caused by hypertension
A new study in Cardiovascular Research indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur. (2018-06-13)

Newly discovered organic nanowires leave manmade technologies in their dust
A microbial protein fiber discovered by a Michigan State University scientist transports charges at rates high enough to be applied in manmade nanotechnologies. The discovery, featured in the current issue of Scientific Reports, describes the high-speed protein fiber produced by uranium-reducing Geobacter bacteria. The fibers are hair-like protein filaments called 'pili' that have the unique property of transporting charges at speeds of 1 billion electrons per second. (2016-03-24)

Mice study implicates fat as obesity cause
Scientists at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology found that only eating high levels of dietary fat makes you fat. They have performed the largest study of its kind to resolve what components of the diet cause mice to put on body fat. (2018-07-13)

Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes
A new study finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes in common -- despite the fact that they are separated by millions of years of evolution. (2017-12-06)

Study: SNAP benefits aren't enough to afford a healthy diet
A new study finds that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, only covers 43-60 percent of what it costs to consume a diet consistent with federal dietary guidelines for what constitutes a healthy diet. The study highlights the challenges lower-income households face in trying to eat a healthy diet. (2017-09-07)

Technologies for the Sixth Generation Cellular Network
Future wireless data networks will have to reach higher transmission rates and shorter delays, while supplying an increasing number of end devices. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use ultra-rapid electro-optical modulators to convert terahertz data signals into optical signals. This is reported in Nature Photonics. (2019-07-25)

Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study finds
Consumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of 'good' bacteria in the colon, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-01-22)

Army scientists revolutionize cybersecurity through quantum research
Army scientists have found a novel way to safeguard quantum information during transmission. This finding has the potential to lead to more secure and reliable communication for warfighters on the battlefield. (2018-11-21)

Your best diet might depend on your genetics
If you've ever seen a friend have good results from a diet but then not been able to match those results yourself, you may not be surprised by new findings in mice that show that diet response is highly individualized. (2016-07-13)

Mediterranean diet may help women receiving IVF to achieve successful pregnancies
New research has found that women who follow a 'Mediterranean' diet in the six months before assisted reproductive treatment have a significantly better chance of becoming pregnant and giving birth to a live baby than women who did not. The study is published in Human Reproduction. (2018-01-29)

Could genetics influence what we like to eat?
Gene variants could affect food preferences in healthy people, according to a new study. The findings could lead to new strategies that make it easier for people to stick to an optimal diet. (2017-04-22)

Can a Mediterranean diet pattern slow aging?
A series of six articles appearing in the March issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences finds new correlations between a Mediterranean diet and healthy aging outcomes -- while also underscoring the need for careful approaches to the use of data in order to measure the diet's potential benefits. (2018-03-30)

Family dinners improve teens' eating habits no matter how well family functions, study finds
More frequent family dinners were associated with more healthful eating by adolescents and young adults, regardless of the level of family functioning in managing daily routines, communicating and connecting emotionally. This study used data from 2,728 teens and young adult living at home with their parents. Frequent family meals were associated with eating more fruits and vegetables and less fast food and takeout food for young people in both high-functioning and low-functioning families. (2018-11-21)

Fountain of youth for heart health may lie in the gut
As our collection of resident gut bacteria changes with age, it increasingly produces harmful metabolites that damage veins and blood vessels, driving disease, a new study suggests (2019-03-19)

College education aids in proper use of dietary supplements among young adults
Young adults who are educated about dietary supplements in college are more likely to use them appropriately, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-11-05)

With these special bacteria, a broccoli a day can keep the cancer doctor away
NUS Medicine researchers have engineered bacteria that specifically targets colorectal cancer cells and converts a substance in some vegetables into an anticancer agent. The system reduced the number of tumors by 75 percent and shrank the remaining tumors by threefold in a mouse model of colorectal cancer. Published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the study suggests that the probiotics taken together with a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables could help prevent colorectal cancer and its recurrence. (2018-01-10)

Dietary restriction and life span in male and hermaphrodite worms
An organism's lifespan is known to be affected by its sex and diet, but where these two factors overlap biologically is not well understood. Researchers in Japan looked for clues in worms that have two sexes: hermaphrodite or male. They found that hermaphrodite worms can live over two weeks longer when put on various forms of dietary restriction, whereas male worms show no change in lifespan.The work appears December 26 in Cell Reports. (2017-12-26)

Fur real: Scientists improve computer rendering of animal fur
The next computer-generated animals in King Kong or The Lion King could look a lot more realistic thanks to a breakthrough by computer scientists at the University of California. The researchers from UC San Diego and UC Berkeley developed a method that dramatically improves the way computers simulate fur, and more specifically, the way light bounces within an animal's pelt. (2018-02-21)

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