Popular Dietary Supplements News and Current Events

Popular Dietary Supplements News and Current Events, Dietary Supplements News Articles.
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Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder?
The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding  needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. (2018-01-03)

Nutritional supplements and diets not always protective, WVU research suggests
Do the nutritional supplements people take or the diets they adhere to actually protect them against cardiovascular problems and death? Maybe not, suggests a new umbrella review of meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials by Safi Khan, an assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine. (2019-07-08)

The role of vitamin A in diabetes
There has been no known link between diabetes and vitamin A -- until now. A new study suggests that the vitamin improves the insulin producing β-cell´s function. (2017-06-13)

Type 2 diabetes and obesity -- what do we really know?
Social and economic factors have led to a dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes and obesity around the world. In a review in Science, Mark McCarthy, professor at the University of Oxford, UK, and Paul Franks, professor at Lund University, Sweden, examine the knowledge of the actual causes and the interplay between genetics and lifestyle factors. (2016-10-06)

Food for thought: Studies reveal diet's role in children's brain health
Eating well, drinking enough water and taking certain supplements have all been shown to positively affect brain function in adults. Less is known about how these factors affect children. At Nutrition 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition, researchers announce new findings on the ways nutrition influences how children think, learn and behave. (2019-06-08)

Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions
If CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. They estimate an additional 250 million people may be at risk of protein deficiency because of elevated CO2 levels. This is the first study to quantify this risk. (2017-08-02)

Your stools reveal whether you can lose weight
Something as simple as a feces sample reveals whether you can lose weight by following dietary recommendations characterized by a high content of fruit, vegetables, fibers and whole grains. This is a finding of a new study conducted at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. (2017-09-12)

Dietary factors associated with substantial proportion of deaths from heart disease, stroke, and disease
Nearly half of all deaths due to heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in the US in 2012 were associated with suboptimal consumption of certain dietary factors, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA. (2017-03-07)

IPT for children with anaemia
Researchers from Tanzania and South Africa, who are part of the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group, hosted at LSTM, have conducted an independent review to assess the effect of intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment for children with anaemia living in malaria endemic regions. (2015-01-15)

Food policies could lower US cardiovascular disease rates
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and partners shows that food policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States. (2017-06-06)

Green tea may protect the bladder from becoming inflamed
Herbal agents could be used to treat inflammatory bladder diseases, according to a preliminary study that looked at the ability of green tea to protect bladder cells from inflammation. The University of Pittsburgh study found that components of green tea protected bladder cells from damage in culture. Green tea, reported to have many health benefits, is rich in powerful antioxidants that make it a desired remedy for many medical conditions. (2007-05-20)

The Lancet: Globally, 1 in 5 deaths are associated with poor diet
People in almost every region of the world could benefit from rebalancing their diets to eat optimal amounts of various foods and nutrients, according to the Global Burden of Disease study tracking trends in consumption of 15 dietary factors from 1990 to 2017 in 195 countries, published in The Lancet. (2019-04-03)

Whole eggs better for muscle building and repair than egg whites, researchers find
People who consume 18 grams of protein from whole eggs or from egg whites after engaging in resistance exercise differ dramatically in how their muscles build protein, a process called protein synthesis, during the post-workout period, researchers report in a new study. Specifically, the post-workout muscle-building response in those eating whole eggs is 40 percent greater than in those consuming an equivalent amount of protein from egg whites, the team found. (2017-12-20)

Autism is associated with zinc deficiency in early development -- now a study links the two
Autism has been associated with zinc deficiency in infancy. While it is not yet known whether zinc deficiency in early development causes autism, scientists have now found a mechanistic link. Published in Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, their study connects zinc, autism risk genes and abnormal neuronal connections associated with autism spectrum disorders. (2018-11-09)

Fiber protects against cardiovascular disease -- especially in women
Foods high in fiber provide good protection against cardiovascular disease, and the effect is particularly marked in women. This is shown in a new study from Lund University in Sweden. (2012-04-16)

High animal protein intake associated with higher, plant protein with lower mortality rate
The largest study to examine the effects of different sources of dietary protein found that a high intake of proteins from animal sources -- particularly processed and unprocessed red meats -- was associated with a higher mortality rate, while a high intake of protein from plant sources was associated with a lower risk of death. (2016-08-01)

Mass media linked to childhood obesity
A task force from the European Academy of Paediatrics and the European Childhood Obesity Group has found evidence of a strong link between obesity levels across European countries and childhood media exposure. (2017-11-22)

Together for more food safety in Europe and its neighboring countries
Strawberries from Spain, tomatoes from the Netherlands, spices from Morocco and citrus fruits from Georgia -- the globalization of food production and food trading is posing new challenges for consumer health protection. The range of foods is getting bigger and their safety has to be guaranteed in increasingly more complex supply chains. (2017-11-06)

From landfill to lipstick: Grape waste as a cosmetic and food ingredient
The world drinks a lot of wine, and that means a lot of grapes are consumed. But not every part of the grape ends up in the bottle. Seeds, stalks and skins end up in landfills. Now, researchers say they have found useful commercial applications, such as prolonging the shelf life of fatty foods, for these wine leftovers. The researchers present their work at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-19)

Will supplements help your workout or diet routine?
The new year is a time to set new goals, and for many people this means losing weight and improving fitness. Many people may turn to dietary supplements for a boost to their routines. To help cut the confusion, the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health has two new resources to help people understand what is known about the effectiveness and safety of many ingredients in dietary supplements promoted for fitness and weight loss. (2018-01-24)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

More dietary calcium may lower risk of cardiovascular disease
In older people, higher dietary calcium intake may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, but not of stroke and fracture, new research from South Korea suggests. The results will be presented in a poster Saturday, April 2, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. (2016-04-02)

Links between eating red meat and distal colon cancer in women
A new study suggests that a diet free from red meat significantly reduces the risk of a type of colon cancer in women living in the United Kingdom. When comparing the effects of certain diets to cancer development in specific subsites of the colon, scientists found that those regularly eating red meat compared to a red meat-free diet had higher rates of distal colon cancer -- cancer found on the descending section of the colon, where faeces is stored. (2018-04-02)

Valuing gluten-free foods relates to health behaviors in young adults
In a new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, researchers found that among young adults valuing gluten-free foods could be indicative of an overall interest in health or nutrition. These young adults were more likely to engage in healthier behaviors including better dietary intake and also valued food production practices (e.g., organic, non-GMO, locally sourced). Of concern, they were also more likely to engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors and over-concern about weight. (2018-06-18)

Mandatory nutrition policies may impact sugar consumption
Mandatory nutrition policies could be a valuable tool in helping high school students to lower their sugar intake, a University of Waterloo study has found. (2018-03-28)

Dietary isoflavones linked to increased risk of advanced prostate cancer
Dietary intake of isoflavones was linked with an elevated risk of advanced prostate cancer in a recent International Journal of Cancer study. (2017-11-08)

Organic food provides significant environmental benefits to plant-rich diets
A study of the diets of 34,000 people confirms that a diet high in fruit and vegetables is better for the planet than one high in animal products. The study also finds that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets, but not for diets with only moderate contribution from plant products. This is the first-ever study to look at the environmental impacts of both food choices and farm production systems. (2018-02-09)

Mobile game that uses implicit learning improved children's short-term food choices
A new study examined how Indian 10- and 11-year-olds' food choices were affected by playing a pediatric dietary mobile game that uses implicit learning--educating players without making them aware of the lessons through innovations in neurocognitive training and immersive technology. The study found that the game significantly improved children's food choices immediately after play. (2021-02-10)

Blood pressure diet improves gout blood marker
A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy and reduced in fats and saturated fats (the DASH diet), designed decades ago to reduce high blood pressure, also appears to significantly lower uric acid, the causative agent of gout. Further, the effect was so strong in some participants that it was nearly comparable to that achieved with drugs specifically prescribed to treat gout, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers shows. (2016-08-15)

Efforts are needed to tap into the potential of nutraceuticals
A growing demand exists for nutraceuticals, which seem to reside in the grey area between pharmaceuticals and food. (2018-02-13)

Eating more protein may not benefit older men
A randomized, clinical trial conducted by Brigham and Women's Hospital investigator Shalender Bhasin, MD, and colleagues has found that higher protein intake did not increase lean body mass, muscle performance, physical function or other well-being measures among older men. (2018-04-02)

Genetic polymorphisms and zinc status
Zinc is an essential component for all living organisms, representing the second most abundant trace element, after iron. This element is widely distributed in the tissues of a human body where it is involved in normal growth, reproduction and several biological functions including immunity, energy metabolism and antioxidant processes. (2018-12-27)

Women who eat fast food take longer to become pregnant
Women who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study by researchers at the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute. (2018-05-03)

A new study indicates the possibility to monitor the progression of Alzheimer's Disease by monitoring major brain antioxidant levels using noninvasive techniques
In a breakthrough human study, anti-oxidant, glutathione (GSH), which protects the brain from stress, has been found to be significantly depleted in Alzheimer's patients compared to normal subjects. As GSH is a very important anti-oxidant that protects the brain from free radicals, the findings give us another measure to use when diagnosing potential for the advancement of Alzheimer's disease or recognizing those that are in the throes of Alzheimer's advancement. (2018-10-12)

Want to remember your dreams? Try taking vitamin B6
New research from the University of Adelaide has found that taking vitamin B6 could help people to recall their dreams. (2018-04-26)

Blueberry and green tea containing supplement protects against stroke damage
A unique dietary supplement of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3 and carnosine -- developed to encourage proliferation of adult stem cells with potential to develop into most tissues and bone cells and the capacity to migrate toward damaged areas -- has been shown to have beneficial effects following experimental stroke in laboratory animals. Tests showed that in animals given NutraStem, stroke-damaged brains developed significant numbers of new neurons over those not receiving the supplement. (2008-03-04)

FDA finds no strong link between tomatoes and reduced cancer risk
A US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review has found only limited evidence for an association between eating tomatoes and a decreased risk of certain cancers, according to an article published online July 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2007-07-10)

Otago study first to report benefits and safety of FODMAP diet in children
The low FODMAP diet, a diet low in carbohydrates that trigger digestive symptoms like bloating and stomach pain, is a useful treatment in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal problems, new University of Otago research confirms. (2019-09-23)

Poor rural population had best diet and health in mid-Victorian years
Poor, rural societies retaining a more traditional lifestyle where high-quality foods were obtained locally enjoyed the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain. A new study, published in JRSM Open, examined the impact of regional diets on the health of the poor during mid-19th century Britain and compared it with mortality data over the same period. (2018-03-08)

Heart-healthy diets are naturally low in dietary cholesterol and can help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke
Eating a heart-healthy dietary pattern rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, vegetable oils and nuts, which is also limits salt, red and processed meats, refined-carbohydrates and added sugars, is relatively low in dietary cholesterol and supports healthy levels of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol. (2019-12-16)

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