Popular Dinosaurs News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Dinosaurs News and Current Events, Dinosaurs News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Paleontologists discover new species of sauropod dinosaur in Tanzania
Paleontologists have identified a new species of titanosaurian dinosaur. The research is reported in a paper published this week in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). (2017-08-25)

Dinosaur age meets the space age at NASA Goddard
A slab of sandstone found on the campus of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland may help scientists rewrite the history of mammal and dinosaur co-existence during the Cretaceous era. (2018-01-31)

Dinosaurs' rise was 'more gradual,' new fossil evidence suggests
Researchers have discovered two small dinosaurs together with a lagerpetid, a group of animals that are recognized as precursors of dinosaurs. The discovery made in Brazil and reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Nov. 10 represents the first time that a dinosaur and a dinosaur precursor have ever been found together. (2016-11-10)

80-million-year-old dinosaur collagen confirmed
Utilizing the most rigorous testing methods to date, researchers from North Carolina State University have isolated additional collagen peptides from an 80-million-year-old Brachylophosaurus. (2017-01-23)

Plant-eating dinosaur discovered in Antarctica
For the first time, the presence of large bodied herbivorous dinosaurs in Antarctica has been recorded. Until now, remains of sauropoda had been recovered from all continental landmasses, except Antarctica. Dr. Ignacio Alejandro Cerda and his team's identification of the remains of the sauropod dinosaur suggests that advanced titanosaurs achieved a global distribution at least by the Late Cretaceous. Their work has just been published online in Springer's journal, Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature. (2011-12-19)

First winged mammals from the Jurassic period discovered
Two 160-million-year-old mammal fossils discovered in China show that the forerunners of mammals in the Jurassic Period evolved to glide and live in trees. With long limbs, long hand and foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding, Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos are the oldest known gliders in the long history of early mammals. (2017-08-09)

World's longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light
In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. French scientists conclude these tracks were left 150 million years ago by a dinosaur at least 35 m long and weighing no less than 35 t. (2017-11-14)

Earth and moon pummeled by more asteroids since the age of dinosaurs, say scientists
The number of asteroids colliding with the Earth and moon has increased by up to three times over the past 290 million years, according to a major new study involving the University of Southampton. These findings, published in Science challenge our previous understanding of Earth's history. (2019-01-17)

Mass extinctions led to low species diversity, dinosaur rule
Two of the earth's five mass extinction events -- times when more than half of the world's species died -- resulted in the survival of a low number of so-called 'weedy' species that spread their sameness across the world as the Earth recovered from these dramatic upheavals. The findings could shed light on modern high extinction rates and how biological communities may change in the future. (2017-10-10)

Robots may need lizard-like tails for 'off-road' travel
Robots may one day tackle obstacles and traverse uneven terrains thanks to collaborative research analyzing the motion of lizards. The study, which featured a University of Queensland researcher, used a slow motion camera to capture the nuanced movement of eight species of Australian agamid lizards that run on two legs -- an action known as 'bipedal' movement. (2018-09-25)

Variation in the recovery of tetrapods
The end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) occurred about 250 million years ago and represents the Earth's most catastrophic extinction event. (2017-08-24)

The success of the plant-eating dinosaurs
Plant-eating dinosaurs had several bursts of evolution, and these were all kicked off by innovations in their teeth and jaws, new research has found. (2016-07-14)

Canuckosaur! First Canadian 'dinosaur' becomes Dimetrodon borealis
A 'dinosaur' fossil originally discovered on Prince Edward Island has been shown to have steak knife-like teeth, and researchers from U of T Mississauga, Carleton University and the Royal Ontario Museum have changed its name to Dimetrodon borealis -- marking the first occurrence of a Dimetrodon fossil in Canada. (2015-11-24)

Tiny fossils unlock clues to Earth's climate half a billion years ago
Scientists from the UK and France have quantified the temperature of Earth's oceans over half a billion years ago by combining fossil data and climate models. (2018-05-09)

The best way to include fossils in the 'tree of life'
A team of scientists from the University of Bristol has suggested that we need to use a fresh approach to analyze relationships in the fossil record to show how all living and extinct species are related in the 'tree of life.' (2017-01-10)

New research solves the 60-year-old paleontological mystery of a 'phantom' dicynodont
A new study has re-discovered fossil collections from a 19th century hermit that validate 'phantom' fossil footprints collected in the 1950s showing dicynodonts coexisting with dinosaurs. (2018-03-14)

Meat-eating dinosaur from Argentina had bird-like breathing system
The remains of a 30-foot-long predatory dinosaur discovered along the banks of Argentina's Rio Colorado is helping to unravel how birds evolved their unusual breathing system. (2008-09-29)

What the asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs meant for birds
Sixty-six million years ago, an asteroid struck the earth and wiped out non-avian dinosaurs. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 24 have pieced together what that asteroid impact meant for birds. From multiple lines of evidence, they show that the only birds to survive the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event lived on the ground. That's apparently because the asteroid's impact destroyed forests worldwide, which took hundreds or even thousands of years to recover. (2018-05-24)

EARTH: Making tracks through the dinosaur diamond
EARTH Magazine travels through time to meet the major players of the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous -- from sauropods and theropods to protomammals -- that created the rich tapestry of life in this region millions of years ago. (2016-04-26)

Why don't turtles still have tail spikes?
In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers from North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences found four necessary components to tail weapon development: size, armor, herbivory and thoracic stiffness. (2018-01-17)

Dinosaurs of a feather flock and die together?
In the paleontology popularity contest, studying the social life of dinosaurs is on the rise. A new publication on the bird-like dinosaur Avimimus, from the late-Cretaceous suggests they were gregarious, social animals -- evidence that flies in the face of the long-held mysticism surrounding dinosaurs as solo creatures. (2016-10-24)

Gigantic mammal 'cousin' discovered
During the Triassic period (252-201 million years ago) mammal-like reptiles called therapsids co-existed with ancestors to dinosaurs, crocodiles, mammals, pterosaurs, turtles, frogs, and lizards. One group of therapsids are the dicynodonts. Researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden, together with colleagues in Poland, have discovered fossils from a new genus of gigantic dicynodont. The new species Lisowicia bojani is described in the journal Science. (2018-11-22)

Largest Ichthyosaurus was pregnant mother
Scientists from the UK and Germany have discovered the largest Ichthyosaurus on record and found it was pregnant at the time of death. (2017-08-28)

Elusive venomous mammal joins the genome club
An article published in GigaScience presents a draft genome of a small shrew-like animal, the venomous Hispaniolan solenodon. This unusual animal is one of the only extant venomous mammals, and it is the sole remaining branch of mammals that split from other insectivores at the time of the dinosaurs. The solenodon genome sequence revealed the answer to several evolutionary questions, such as whether the solenodon species indeed survived the meteor impact that killed the dinosaurs. (2018-03-16)

Tiny dinosaur may have dazzled mates with rainbow ruff and a bony crest
Ancient dinosaurs were adorned in some amazing ways, from the horns of the triceratops to the plates and spikes of the stegosaurus. A newly discovered, bird-like dinosaur fossil from China contains evidence that could add a new accessory to the list: a shaggy ruff of rainbow feathers. (2018-01-16)

'Treasure trove' of dinosaur footprints found in southern England
More than 85 well-preserved dinosaur footprints -- made by at least seven different species -- have been uncovered in East Sussex, representing the most diverse and detailed collection of these trace fossils from the Cretaceous Period found in the UK to date. (2018-12-17)

Research on dinosaur embryos reveals that eggs took 3 to 6 months to hatch
New research on the teeth of fossilized dinosaur embryos indicates that the eggs of non-avian dinosaurs took a long time to hatch --between about three and six months. The study finds that contrary to previous assumptions, dinosaur incubation is more similar to that of typical reptiles than of birds. The work suggests that prolonged incubation may have affected dinosaurs' ability to compete following the mass extinction event that occurred 65 million years ago. (2017-01-02)

Man's earliest ancestors discovered in southern England
Fossils of the oldest mammals related to mankind have been discovered on the Jurassic Coast of Dorset in the UK. The two teeth are from small, rat-like creatures that lived 145 million years ago in the shadow of the dinosaurs. They are the earliest undisputed fossils of mammals belonging to the line that led to human beings. (2017-11-07)

Discriminating diets of meat-eating dinosaurs
A big problem with dinosaurs is that there seem to be too many meat-eaters. From studies of modern animals, there is a feeding pyramid, with plants at the bottom, then plant-eaters, and then meat-eaters at the top. (2019-11-03)

Mammals diversified only after dinosaur extinction left space
Humans' early mammal relatives likely diversified 66 million years ago, after the extinction of dinosaurs opened up space for animals such as big cats, horses, elephants and eventually apes to evolve. (2016-07-04)

Cretaceous snails conceal themselves in monuments in Madrid
The fountains standing next to the Museo del Prado are built using a sedimentary rock full of gastropod shells from the time of the dinosaurs. These fossils have revealed the origin of the stone: forgotten quarries in Redueña, in the province of Madrid, where the building material for the Fountain of Apollo and the Palacio de las Cortes also came from. (2017-08-03)

127-million-year-old baby bird fossil sheds light on avian evolution
The tiny fossil of a prehistoric baby bird is helping scientists understand how early avians came into the world in the Age of Dinosaurs. The fossil, which dates back to the Mesozoic Era (250-65 million years ago), is a chick from a group of prehistoric birds called, Enantiornithes. Made up of a nearly complete skeleton, the specimen is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils ever discovered. (2018-03-05)

New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
An international team of palaeontologists, which includes the University of Bristol, has discovered that the flying reptiles, pterosaurs, actually had four kinds of feathers, and these are shared with dinosaurs -- pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. (2018-12-17)

Molecular analysis of anchiornis feather gives clues to origin of flight
An international team of researchers has performed molecular analysis on fossil feathers from a small, feathered dinosaur from the Jurassic. Their research could aid scientists in pinpointing when feathers evolved the capacity for flight during the dinosaur-bird transition. (2019-01-28)

'Last African dinosaur' discovered in Moroccan mine
One of the last dinosaurs living in Africa before their extinction 66 million years ago has been discovered in a phosphate mine in northern Morocco. A study of the fossil, led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, suggests that following the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana in the middle of the Cretaceous period, a distinct dinosaur fauna evolved in Africa. (2017-05-03)

The dinosaur museum that visits you
The vast expanses of the Gobi Desert are a prime destination for paleontologists. Since the 1920s, expeditions to the Gobi have unearthed thousands of dinosaur fossils, including the nests and eggs of Oviraptor, the bones of the iconic Velociraptor, and the skeletons of the giant plant-eater Saurolophus. Today, a very different type of behemoth rumbles through rural Mongolia. It's called the Moveable (2017-08-24)

Most complete study on Europe's greatest Hadrosaur site published
The Basturs Poble site (Lleida) is the most important site in Europe when it comes to hadrosaur remains. It has yielded over 1000 fossils, probably pertaining to the same species. Palaeontologists from the Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont (ICP), the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and the Museum of Conca Dellà (MCD) publish the most complete study of fossils recovered from the site and reveals the presence of many young individuals. (2018-11-08)

Newly discovered armored dinosaur from Utah reveals intriguing family history
Fossils of a new genus and species of an ankylosaurid dinosaur -- Akainacephalus johnsoni -- have been unearthed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, USA, and are revealing new details about the diversity and evolution of this group of armored dinosaurs. The research indicates that the defining features of Akainacephalus -- the spiky bony armor covering the skull and snout -- align more closely with Asian ankylosaurids than other North American Late Cretaceous ankylosaurid dinosaurs. (2018-07-19)

Study shows flight limitations of earliest feathered dinosaurs
Anchiornis, one of the earliest feathered dinosaurs ever discovered, was found to have the ability to fly. However, could it fly like birds today? A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by researchers from China and the U.S. says no. (2019-01-28)

Soot may have killed off the dinosaurs and ammonites
A new hypothesis on the extinction of dinosaurs and ammonites at the end of the Cretaceous Period has been proposed by a research team from Tohoku University and the Japan Meteorological Agency's Meteorological Research Institute. (2016-07-14)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.