Popular Disability News and Current Events

Popular Disability News and Current Events, Disability News Articles.
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Neurological assessment of older adults: A crystal ball to the future
Indiana University Center for Aging Research faculty editorial in Archives of Internal Medicine says standard neurological exams of older adults are good predictors of future brain health and quality of life and should be part of physician's routine iexamination of older adults. (2008-06-23)

Enzyme may get key role in drug design for breast cancer and brain condition
In recent years, researchers have focused on the enzyme TLK2 suspecting it of playing a main role in several diseases. A new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen now reveals that the enzyme displays lower levels of activity in intellectual disability and that it is possible to inhibit it in breast cancer, where it is overactive. The study thus suggests that the enzyme may be a target for potential therapies. (2018-06-29)

Research finds college students with ADHD are likely to experience significant challenges
In one of largest and most comprehensive investigations of college students with ADHD ever conducted, new research confirms students with ADHD face significant challenges across all four years of college and predicts ways academic outcomes can be improved. (2021-02-23)

Survey provides new directions for employment of people with disabilities
Survey findings indicate that the majority of employers have processes and practices in place for the inclusion of employees with and without disabilities, and that the commitment to the success of employees with disabilities is shared by supervisors and upper management. The findings offer insight into how effective these processes and practices are for all employees, and point to new directions for expanding their availability, and increasing their effectiveness for individuals with disabilities. (2017-10-10)

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Older Americans with diabetes living longer without disability, US study shows
Older Americans with diabetes born in the 1940s are living longer and with less disability performing day to day tasks than those born 10 years earlier, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. (2016-06-11)

Family impact of congenital Zika syndrome likely to last a lifetime
The impact of congenital Zika syndrome on families will be substantial and will last a lifetime, given its severity and uncertainty about long-term outcomes for infants. (2018-02-01)

ESC press release: Loss of muscle and weight associated with disability after stroke
Loss of muscle and body weight is associated with disability after stroke, reports a study presented today at Heart & Stroke 2019, a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Stroke, and published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. (2019-01-25)

nTIDE Nov 2017 Jobs Report: Ongoing job gains bode well for Americans with disabilities
The job outlook remained positive for Americans with disabilities, with yet another month of gains in the major economic indicators, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment - Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD). This upward trend now extends to 20 consecutive months of gains in the labor market for people with disabilities. (2017-12-08)

Scientists find positive workplace experiences among Americans with disabilities
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire, Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD), have authored a new article that identifies how Americans with disabilities are striving to work and overcoming barriers to employment. (2018-04-13)

We need to talk about sexuality after stroke
Stroke survivors and their partners are not adequately supported to deal with changes to their relationships, self-identity, gender roles and intimacy following stroke, according to new research from the University of Sydney. (2018-09-06)

End-of-life decision-making for people with intellectual disabilities
There has been little research on end-of-life decision-making for the growing population of older Americans with intellectual disabilities. Through a series of interviews with five different emergency medical service agencies in upstate New York, UB researchers asked EMS providers specifically how pre-hospital orders shape what they do in the case of someone with an intellectual disability. (2017-10-06)

People in Canada have good health, are living longer: Global Burden of Disease Study trends
Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-11-05)

Warning follows report into online child sexual abuse risk
If the public are serious about wanting to protect children from online sexual abuse more investment in skilled professionals is needed now. The stark warning comes from researchers following publication of a new report commissioned by the Independent Inquiry on Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) which coincided with the first day of the public hearing into online child sexual abuse. (2018-01-23)

Synthetic cannabis ('spice', 'k2') use may boost stroke risk in young users
Synthetic cannabis, also popularly known as 'spice' or 'k2,' may boost the risk of a stroke in young users, warn US doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2018-06-07)

Improvement of the genetic decoding of neurodevelopmental disorders
A team from ULB, HUDERF and (IB)² improves the genetic decoding of neurodevelopmental disorders. (2017-10-05)

People with disabilities more likely to be arrested
People with disabilities face all sorts of discrimination every day. New Cornell University research suggests they may also face it while interacting with the police. (2017-11-30)

Obesity may hasten disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
Unintentional weight loss also linked with worsening disability, perhaps related to frailty. (2018-04-30)

Joint distraction promotes structural repair in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis
Joint distraction (the use of a surgical frame around a degenerated joint to strengthen and promote repair) promotes cartilage repair in severe end stage osteoarthritis of the knee, as demonstrated for the first time by data presented today at EULAR 2008, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Paris. (2008-06-13)

Risk of developing depression and anxiety is higher in those with cerebral palsy
Adults with cerebral palsy have a higher risk of developing depression and anxiety than their peers without the condition, a new study in the journal JAMA Neurology reports. (2019-01-02)

Studies examine rheumatoid arthritis patients' prognosis
What's the long-term outlook for today's patients with early rheumatoid arthritis? A new study in Arthritis & Rheumatology that looks at patients' mortality, disease activity, and physical function over the course of 20 years reveals the importance of early treatment. Another study in the journal notes that deaths from arthritis are declining. (2017-04-20)

Emotional support is key for stroke patients, research suggests
Doctors caring for severe stroke patients need to take account of their psychological needs and help prepare families for the possibility that they may not recover, a study suggests. (2018-03-09)

Poor and less educated suffer the most from chronic pain
Poorer and less-educated older Americans are more like to suffer from chronic pain than those with greater wealth and more education, but the disparity between the two groups is much greater than previously thought, climbing as high as 370 percent in some categories, according to new research by a University at Buffalo medical sociologist. (2017-02-08)

Studies provide new insights on mosquito-borne chikungunya virus infection
The frequency of chronic joint pain after infection with chikungunya in a large Latin-American cohort was 25 percent at a median of 20-months post-infection. (2017-12-20)

Sorting out risk genes for brain development disorders
Gene discovery research is uncovering similarities and differences underlying a variety of disorders affecting the developing brain, including autism, attention deficits, tics, intellectual impairments, developmental delays and language difficulties. Researchers found some genes are more closely associated with autism and others with intellectual impairments, but many times there is overlap, indicating some genes pose broader risks. Certain genes were detected only in males with high-functioning autism. (2017-02-22)

Active young adults with Type 1 diabetes have muscle complications
A new study from McMaster and York universities in Canada has found that poor muscle health may be a complication of Type 1 diabetes, even among active twenty-somethings. (2018-04-18)

Cooling treatment reduces epilepsy in children
Cooling babies deprived of oxygen at birth (perinatal asphyxia) can reduce the number of children who develop epilepsy later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal Epilepsia. (2017-10-03)

Is back pain killing us?
Older people who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, University of Sydney research has found. Published in the European Journal of Pain, the study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. (2017-02-23)

Health surrogates for older adults often don't know their care preferences
When it comes to making health decisions for an older adult, what health surrogates don't know can be harmful, according to new research. While 75 percent of surrogates feel extremely confident in their knowledge of a loved one's preferences, only 21 percent of them actually know what the older patient would want in the event of a serious illness, the researchers said. (2018-11-26)

nTIDE June 2018 jobs report: downturn in jobs ends trend for americans with disabilities
A modest downturn for June indicated the end of 26 consecutive months of job gains for American with disabilities, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment -- Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD). (2018-07-06)

Genes play a role in empathy
A new study led by scientists from the University of Cambridge, the Institut Pasteur, Paris Diderot University, the CNRS and the genetics company 23andMe suggests that our empathy is not just a result of our education and experience but is also partly influenced by genetic variations. These results will be published in the journal Translational Psychiatry on March 12, 2018. (2018-03-11)

Patients who receive prescription Opioids are more satisfied with care than other patients
Patients who receive prescription Opioids are more satisfied with care than other patients. (2018-01-09)

Despite fewer looking for work, gains continue for Americans with disabilities
Job gains continued for Americans with disabilities in May, although fewer were looking for work, according to today's National Trends in Disability Employment - Monthly Update (nTIDE). (2018-06-01)

Study unravels the genetics of childhood 'overgrowth'
Researchers have undertaken the world's largest genetic study of childhood overgrowth syndromes -- providing new insights into their causes, and new recommendations for genetic testing. (2017-05-04)

New research calls for rethink on approach to treating NTDs in urban areas
New research published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, suggests the effectiveness of large-scale distribution of medication (known as Mass Drug Administration or MDA) to treat lymphatic filariasis (LF) in urban areas needs to be re-examined. (2018-02-05)

Hip replacement improves function, saves money, at any age
Seniors with osteoarthritis who undergo total hip replacement are twice as likely as those who do not to show improvements in physical functioning and increased ability to care for themselves, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. The study, which is the largest of its kind conducted to date, found that there is no age limit on the benefits of hip replacement for patients. (2008-06-16)

Risk of long-term disability in older adults who visit the ED
Older adults who go to the emergency department (ED) for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, according to a study by Yale researchers. (2017-01-06)

Adults with disabilities screened less often for colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in the United States, with nearly 135,000 cases reported in 2016. The likelihood of surviving colorectal cancer is strongly related to the stage in which it is diagnosed. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that individuals with certain disabilities are less likely to receive recommended preventive screenings. The researchers hope the finding will lead to targeted interventions and increased awareness. (2017-03-29)

Clinical trial supports chiropractic care as component of care for low back pain
US military personnel with low back pain who received usual medical care plus chiropractic care reported moderate improvement in their pain intensity and disability compared with patients who received usual medical care alone. (2018-05-18)

Undiagnosed spine fractures often cause pain in older men
Fewer than a quarter of new vertebral fractures are clinically diagnosed, yet they often cause symptoms. In a study of older men in the general population now published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, clinically undiagnosed vertebral fractures that were evident on X-rays were associated with higher likelihood of back pain and limited physical activity. (2017-09-07)

A method to measure diagnostic errors could be key to preventing disability and death from misdiagnosis
In an effort to reduce patient misdiagnoses and associated poor patient outcomes from lack of prompt treatment, a Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality researcher is helping to lead the way in providing hospitals a new approach to quantify and monitor diagnostic errors in their quality improvement efforts. The approach, called Symptom-Disease Pair Analysis of Diagnostic Error, or SPADE, is featured in a paper published today in BMJ Quality & Safety. (2018-01-22)

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