Popular Divorce News and Current Events

Popular Divorce News and Current Events, Divorce News Articles.
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Parents who had severe trauma, stresses in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems
A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents' lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children. (2018-07-09)

Parents not confident schools can assist child with chronic disease, mental health
Most parents are sure schools would be able to provide basic first aid but are less confident about a school's ability to respond to more complex health situations, such as an asthma attack or mental health problem. (2017-09-18)

Shared custody equals less stress for children
Children who live full time with one parent are more likely to feel stressed than children in shared custody situations. The benefit holds regardless of the level of conflict between the parents or between parent and child. These are the results of a new study from Stockholm University's Demography Unit. (2017-08-30)

Too much commitment may be unhealthy for relationships, UH psychology professor says
Researchers at the University of Houston report that partners who base their self-worth solely upon the outcomes of romantic interactions may experience depression and anxiety and ultimately undermine their relationships. (2008-12-02)

Childhood spankings can lead to adult mental health problems
Getting spanked as a child can lead to a host of mental health problems in adulthood, say University of Michigan researchers. (2017-11-02)

Gender roles highlight gender bias in judicial decisions
Judges may be just as biased or even more biased than the general public in deciding court cases where traditional gender roles are challenged, according to a new study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (2018-04-03)

Psychologists find pursuit of happiness not a straight path
Happily ever after isn't a given. Achievable, yes, says a Michigan State University psychologist. But after analyzing years of data tracking people through their lives of joys and sorrows, scientists conclude that major changes in life circumstances -- like marriage, divorce or debilitating illness -- can indeed have long-term impact on happiness levels. (2007-03-08)

Time parents spend with children key to academic success
The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce. (2019-02-04)

Immigrant parents report fewer adverse childhood experiences than US-born parents
A new study found immigrants reported fewer potentially health-harming adverse childhood experiences, such as abuse, violence, or divorce, than native-born Americans. The findings, which will be highlighted in an abstract presentation during the American Academy of Pediatrics 2017 National Conference & Exhibition, suggest immigrants may experience different forms of stress early in life than do those born in the United States. (2017-09-15)

Smoking, lack of exercise linked to early death after divorce
A growing body of research links divorce to a wide range of poor health outcomes, including greater risk for early death. A new University of Arizona study points to two possible culprits: a greater likelihood of smoking after divorce and lower levels of physical activity. (2018-05-29)

Eating disorders are affecting more UK women in their 40s and 50s
In a UK study of 5,320 women, 3 percent were found to have an active eating disorder in mid-life, a figure higher than expected as eating disorders are primarily associated with adolescence or early adulthood. The research was published in the open-access journal BMC Medicine. (2017-01-16)

Brain SPECT imaging predicts outcomes in depressed patients
New research from the Amen Clinics shows that brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging, a study that measures blood flow and activity patterns, identifies who is likely to get better from depression and who is not. The study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, because depression is a highly treatable risk for cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. (2018-03-20)

Keeping young women's weight gain to less than 800g/year could help prevent progression from healthy weight to overweight and obesity
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (May 17-20) shows that rates of weight gain are established by the time women are 18-23 years old. Measuring rates of weight gain at this age could identify women who are likely to become overweight or obese by the time they are 40. Furthermore, women who are divorced, separated or widowed, and those who smoke >10/day are most at risk of becoming overweight or obese. (2017-05-18)

Brain matures faster due to childhood stress
Stress in early childhood leads to faster maturation of certain brain regions during adolescence. In contrast, stress experienced later in life leads to slower maturation of the adolescent brain. This is the outcome of a long-term study conducted by researchers of Radboud University in which 37 subjects have been monitored for almost 20 years. The findings will be published in Scientific Reports on June 15. (2018-06-15)

Is shotgun marriage dead?
Shotgun marriages have faded in popularity overall, but are on the rise among some groups, says new research from Duke University. And not all shotgun marriages are as rocky as one might think. (2016-11-01)

Divorce and low socioeconomic status carry higher risk of second heart attack or stroke
Heart attack survivors who are divorced or have low socioeconomic status have a higher risk of a second attack, according to research from Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology journal. (2018-04-17)

Research shows infertility tied to relationship disruption in Ghana
New research shows Ghanaian women who have problems conceiving are more likely to experience relationship breakdown. (2017-03-07)

Divorce drops a person's wealth by 77 percent, study finds
A new nationwide study provides some of the best evidence to date of the devastating financial toll divorce can wreak on a person's wealth. The study of about 9,000 people found that divorce reduces a person's wealth by about three-quarters (77 percent) compared to that of a single person, while being married almost doubles comparative wealth (93 percent). (2006-01-18)

Marriage makes men fatter, shows new research
Being married makes men gain weight, and the early days of fatherhood add to the problem, finds new research from the University of Bath's School of Management. (2017-06-21)

Skewed sex ratios causes single fathers to bring up the young
When the balance of the sexes is skewed towards one gender, parents are more likely to split up, leaving the father to care for the offspring, says a study from an international team of scientists studying bird populations. (2018-04-25)

Husbands' stress increases if wives earn more than 40 per cent of household income
Husbands are least stressed when their wives earn up to 40% of household income but they become increasingly uncomfortable as their spouse's wages rise beyond that point. (2019-11-19)

When Marriages Fail, The Home Is Often A Major Source Of Conflict
Home may be where the heart is, but when homes and hearts break apart, the family home is less a haven and more a source of stress and conflict, a University of Illinois professor reports (1997-06-03)

Negative fateful life events and the brains of middle-aged men
Conflict, a death in the family, financial hardship and serious medical crises are all associated with accelerated physical aging. In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that such negative fateful life events -- or FLEs -- appear to also specifically accelerate aging in the brain. (2018-04-05)

Equal earnings help couples say 'I do' and stay together
Recent work by Patrick Ishizuka, a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University's Cornell Population Center, is the first to offer empirical evidence that cohabitating couples are likely to get married only when they earn as much as their married peers. (2018-04-12)

Social networks and suicide prevention
Depression and mental health problems are increasing - and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA. In many US communities, traditional social networks -- face-to-face contacts of daily life -- are unraveling with the loss of social supports, Flinders University psychiatrists warn in a letter published in the international journal The Lancet. This is associated with increasing 'deaths of despair' related to alcohol, opiate overdose and suicide 'becoming more prevalent than ever.' (2019-05-22)

Divorce: On the decline in sub-Saharan Africa
With education, employment and income levels all rising for women in sub-Saharan Africa, many observers have speculated that divorce rates would follow suit -- as they have in much of the developed world. But a new study by McGill University researchers finds that divorce rates across 20 African countries over the past 20 years have remained stable or declined. (2015-12-16)

Teens need to text, talk with parents often to maintain youth resiliency after a divorce
Texting, FaceTime and other popular communication methods among teens may help build supportive parent-youth relationships after a divorce, according to a Kansas State University family studies researcher. (2019-02-20)

Massive study finds parenting practices don't suffer during divorce
New research is challenging the notion that parents who divorce necessarily exhibit a diminished capacity to parent in the period following divorce. A large, longitudinal study conducted by University of Alberta sociology professor Lisa Strohschein has found that divorce does not change parenting behavior, and that there are actually more similarities than differences in parenting between recently divorced and married parents. (2007-12-10)

Loss of spouse or partner to suicide linked to physical, mental disorders
People who lose a partner to suicide are at increased risk for a number of mental and physical disorders, including cancer, depression, herniated discs and mood disorders than those in the general population, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. (2017-03-22)

Closer monitoring of surgeons needed to stave off burn-out and heavy drinking
Surgeons need closer monitoring to stave off their risk of burn-out, heavy drinking, and other unhealthy behaviours, and it's time for the profession to fix this problem itself before the government steps in, urges a leading surgeon in an editorial published in the Journal of ISAKOS (JISAKOS). (2018-06-25)

To help divorced parents, programs should address financial and parenting barriers
A new study from the University of Missouri shows that concerns about co-parenting differ by gender, impacting the ability of divorced parents to work together in supporting their children's development. By understanding the implications of these concerns, better programs for divorcing parents can be developed that can have a positive impact on the overall health of the children involved. (2016-10-25)

Surprising health changes among postmenopausal women who marry or divorce
Contrary to previous data, a new study finds that some health measures in postmenopausal women, such as body mass index (BMI), tend to worsen if the women marry and to improve if they divorce or separate from their partner. The study, which analyzed data from more than 79,000 postmenopausal women participating in the Women's Health Initiative, is published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. (2017-02-06)

On-again, off-again relationships might be toxic for mental health
A researcher from the University of Missouri says that the pattern of breaking up and getting back together can impact an individual's mental health and not for the better. He suggests people in these kinds of relationships should make informed decisions about stabilizing or safely terminating their relationships. (2018-08-23)

Childhood adversity linked to higher out-of-pocket health care costs in adulthood
A study has found that out-of-pocket health care spending and medical debt are substantially higher when adults have a history of adverse childhood experiences. The study showed that household medical costs were 30 percent higher, and the likelihood of medical debt was doubled, when an adult had lived through three or more adverse experiences during childhood. (2019-03-21)

Study examines relationship between social disparities and benign prostatic hyperplasia
In an Andrologia study of 100,000 men in Korea, social disparities -- such as low education level and low household income, current or previous use of medical aid health insurance, blue-collar employment or unemployment, divorce, and low social capital of communities -- were all linked with a higher prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that is characterized by an enlarged prostate due to aging, lower urinary tract blockage, and other factors. (2018-08-22)

Mom's reward: Female Galápagos seabird has a shorter lifespan than males
The male Nazca booby, a large seabird of the Galápagos Islands, often outlives the domineering female of the species, according to new research from Wake Forest University published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology. Why? It's a story of rotating sex partners, the cost of being a parent and how the body falls apart in old age. (2019-02-12)

Positive thinking may protect against breast cancer
Feelings of happiness and optimism play a positive role against breast cancer. Research published today in the open access journal BMC Cancer suggests that while staying positive has a protective role, adverse life events such as the loss of a parent or close relative, divorce or the loss of a spouse can increase a woman's risk of developing the disease. (2008-08-21)

Parental divorce linked to suicidal thoughts
Adult children of divorce are more likely to have seriously considered suicide than their peers from intact families, suggests new research from the University of Toronto. (2011-01-19)

Songbirds divorce, flee, fail to reproduce due to suburban sprawl
New University of Washington research finds that for some songbirds, urban sprawl is kicking them out of their territory, forcing divorce and stunting their ability to find new mates and reproduce successfully, even after relocating. (2017-01-03)

Why does divorce run in families? The answer may be genetics
Children of divorced parents are more likely to get divorced when compared to those who grew up in two-parent families -- and genetic factors are the primary explanation, according to a new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden. (2017-10-04)

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