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Popular Dolphins News and Current Events, Dolphins News Articles.
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Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. (2019-10-28)
Diverse and abundant megafauna documented at new Atlantic US Marine National Monument
Airborne marine biologists were dazzled by the diversity and abundance of large, unusual and sometimes endangered marine wildlife on a recent trip to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Marine Monument, about 150 miles southeast of Cape Cod. (2018-05-16)
Skin game
Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins. (2018-12-13)
Themed issue lays foundation for emerging field of collective movement ecology
Collective movement is one of the great natural wonders on Earth and has long captured our imaginations. (2018-03-26)
A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)
Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)
Marine charities net more than iconic fishery: Massachusetts
Massachusetts boasts one of the most iconic fisheries in the US, but new research suggests that protecting marine coastlines has surpassed commercial fishing as an economic driver. (2018-03-08)
Virtual reality makes journalism immersive, realism makes it credible
Virtual reality technology may help journalists pull an audience into their stories, but they should avoid being too flashy, or their credibility could suffer, according to a team of researchers. (2017-12-07)
Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fall
Fishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows. (2018-03-29)
UEA research paints underwater pictures with sound
Silent marine robots that record sounds underwater are allowing researchers to listen to the oceans as never before. (2018-04-10)
Study of sleeping fur seals provides insight into the function of REM sleep
All land mammals and birds have two types of sleep: rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (also called slow-wave sleep). (2018-06-07)
Dolphin diets suggest extreme changes in the ocean may shorten food chains
Extreme marine conditions like El Niño are associated with shorter food chain length in the California Current ecosystem, a new analysis reports. (2017-10-18)
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. (2019-04-19)
Dolphins deliberately killed for use as bait in global fisheries
Ahead of World Oceans Day, new research exposes the practice of killing of aquatic mammals, including some listed as endangered, for the express purpose of securing bait for global fisheries. (2018-06-07)
Baby fish led astray by high CO2 in oceans
Baby fish will find it harder to reach secure shelters in future acidified oceans -- putting fish populations at risk, new research from the University of Adelaide has concluded. (2018-04-11)
New study investigates dolphin liberation in Korea
A international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has carried out a scientific investigation on dolphin liberation in South Korea. (2018-05-27)
Tsunami reveals human noise pollution in Hawaiian waters
Spinner dolphins in bays along Hawaii's Kona Coast are subjected to underwater sound levels more than 16 times louder than natural due to noise pollution from ecotourism, sonar exercises and other human activities in the bays, a Duke University-led study finds. (2017-10-30)
Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. (2019-03-12)
Remarkably preserved fossil sea reptile reveals skin that is still soft
The remains of an 180 million-year-old ichthyosaur (literally 'fish-lizard') have been analysed, and the fossil is so well-preserved that its soft-tissues retain some of their original pliability. (2018-12-06)
Smart skin for flexible monitoring
An electronic tag that stretches and flexes while it records location and environmental data can monitor marine animals in their natural habitat. (2018-05-03)
West African dolphin now listed as one of Africa's rarest mammals
A group of scientists now considers a little-known dolphin that only lives along the Atlantic coasts of Western Africa to be among the continent's most endangered mammals, a list that includes widely recognized species such as gorillas, African wild dogs, and black rhinos, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and the IUCN's (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Cetacean Specialist Group. (2017-12-21)
Climate shifts shorten marine food chain off California
Environmental disturbances such as El Niño shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time. (2017-10-19)
No-fishing zones help endangered penguins
Small no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows. (2018-01-16)
Cutting-edge cameras reveal the secret life of dolphins
A world-first study testing new underwater cameras on wild dolphins has given researchers the best view yet into their hidden marine world. (2017-02-20)
Are drones disturbing marine mammals?
Marine researchers have made sure that their research drones aren't disturbing their research subjects, shows a report in Frontiers in Marine Science. (2017-02-13)
A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales
A new study sheds light on how toothed whales adapted their sonar abilities to occupy different environments. (2018-11-15)
New tool improves fishing efficiency and sustainability
New software targets most abundant fishing grounds and reduces catch of unwanted or protected species using satellite data, maps and observations. (2018-05-30)
Threatened whales and dolphins recognize predatory killer whales from their alarming calls
Some killer whales prey on aquatic mammals while others, which prey on fish alone, pose on threat; so how do aquatic mammals know when they are at risk from killer whales? (2018-06-12)
How ancient whales lost their legs, got sleek and conquered the oceans
An international team of scientists says the gradual shrinkage of the whales' hind limbs over 15 million years was the result of slowly accumulated genetic changes that influenced the size of the limbs and that these changes happened sometime late in development, during the fetal period. (2006-05-22)
Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stress
Stress from human disturbances could cause behavioral responses in narwhals that are inconsistent with their physiological capacities, researchers say. (2017-12-07)
Bats vs. dolphins -- the ultimate battle of sonar systems
To find ways to improve man-made active sensing, scientists worldwide study the sonar systems of bats and dolphins. (2018-11-06)
Industrial fishing threatens sharks, dolphins, billfish
Industrial fishing poses the biggest threat to life and fin for sharks, dolphins and billfish that inhabit the tropical and northern Pacific Ocean, says a new study forecasting the effects of commercial fishing on ocean ecosystems. (2002-08-05)
Whales and dolphins influence new wind turbine design
By studying the flippers, fins and tails of whales and dolphins, scientists have discovered some features of their structure that contradict long-held engineering theories. (2008-07-07)
Brazil Establishes World's Largest Rainforest Reserve
The government of the Brazilian state of Amazonas has created a new reserve in the Amazon, thus establishing the world's largest contiguous block of protected rainforest, the Wildlife Conservation Society, headquartered at the Bronx Zoo, announced today. (1997-10-27)
In polar regions, warm-blooded marine predators rule
Even though diversity typically decreases from the tropics to the poles, in the frigid waters of the high latitudes, warm-blooded marine mammals and birds thrive, both in number and species richness. (2019-01-24)
River dolphins are declining steeply in the Amazon basin
Populations of freshwater dolphins in the Amazon basin are in steep decline, dropping by half about every decade at current rates, according to a study published May 2, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Vera da Silva from Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, and colleagues. (2018-05-02)
New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordings
Scientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct dolphin click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins. (2017-12-07)
Empathy more common in animals than thought
A new study reveals that prairie voles console loved ones who are feeling stressed -- and it appears that the infamous 'love hormone,' oxytocin, is the underlying mechanism. (2016-01-21)
Immature spinner dolphin calf SCUBA tanks spell disaster in tuna fisheries
Dolphins that live in the deep ocean have well developed oxygen storage, but now it turns out that spinner dolphin calves do not develop their SCUBA capacity any faster than coastal species, despite their deep diving lifestyle. (2017-04-19)
Dolphins following shrimp trawlers cluster in social groups
Bottlenose dolphins near Savannah, Georgia are split into social groups according to whether or not they forage behind commercial shrimp trawlers, according to a study published Feb. (2017-02-01)
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