Popular Dopamine News and Current Events

Popular Dopamine News and Current Events, Dopamine News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Brain region central to placebo effect identified
Researchers have pinpointed a brain region central to the machinery of the placebo effect -- the often controversial phenomenon in which a person's belief in the efficacy of a treatment such as a painkilling drug influences its effect. (2007-07-18)

New treatment offers potentially promising results for the possibility of slowing, stopping, or even reversing Parkinson's disease
A pioneering clinical trials program that delivered an experimental treatment directly to the brain offers hope that it may be possible to restore the cells damaged in Parkinson's disease. The study investigated whether boosting the levels of a naturally-occurring growth factor, Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), can regenerate dying dopamine brain cells in patients with Parkinson's and reverse their condition, something no existing treatment can do. (2019-02-27)

Brain neurons help keep track of time
Turning the theory of how the human brain perceives time on its head, a novel analysis in mice reveals that dopamine neuron activity plays a key role in judgment of time, slowing down the internal clock. (2016-12-08)

Study shows how light therapy might help premature babies avoid vision problems
Scientists discovered a light-dependent molecular pathway that regulates how blood vessels develop in the eye. The findings in Nature Cell Biology suggest it may be possible to use light therapy to help premature infants whose eyes are still developing avoid vision problems. The novel molecular process helps ensure blood-vessel development in the eye is appropriately balanced to prepare it for visual function. (2019-04-01)

New sensors track dopamine in the brain for more than year
MIT neuroscientists devised a way to measure dopamine in the brain for up to a year, which they believe will teach them much more about its role in key brain functions and in disorders such as depression and Parkinson's disease. (2018-09-12)

Keep calm and carry on: VTCRI scientists make first serotonin measurements in humans
Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have begun to unravel how serotonin acts, based on data collected in a first-of-its-kind experiment that utilized electrochemical probes implanted into the brain of awake human beings. (2018-04-30)

The emergence of a new dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia
Biological Psychiatry presents a special issue, 'The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia,' dedicated to recent advances in understanding the role of dopamine signaling in schizophrenia. The issue, organized by Anissa Abi-Dargham, M.D., of Stony Brook University, New York, and a deputy editor of Biological Psychiatry, compiles seven reviews that summarize current knowledge and provide new insights. (2017-01-02)

Bacteriophages: Are they an overlooked driver of Parkinson's disease?
In the first study of its kind, researchers from the New York-based Human Microbiology Institute have discovered the role certain bacteriophages may play in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (2018-06-10)

Dopamine neurons mull over your options
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have found that dopamine neurons in the brain can represent the decision-making process when making economic choices. As monkeys contemplated whether or not to choose an item, a subset of dopamine neurons transitioned from indicating the item's value to indicating the monkey's ultimate decision. Encoding of the decision into these dopamine neurons happened earlier than it did in other parts of the brain related to economic decision-making. (2020-07-07)

Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
In their study of fish larvae, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Driever and his team of neurobiologists at the University of Freiburg discovered that a group of nerve cells in the forebrain release the neurotransmitter dopamine when activated by tactile or certain visual stimuli. These dopaminergic nerve cells send connections to almost all parts of the brain and spinal cord. These new findings could play a role in future treatment of such illnesses as restless leg syndrome. (2017-01-13)

Brain scans show dopamine levels fall during migraine attacks
Using PET scans of the brain, University of Michigan researchers showed that dopamine falls and fluctuates at different times during a migraine headache. (2017-03-29)

Neurotrophic factor GDNF is an important regulator of dopamine neurons in the brain
New research results are expanding our understanding of the physiological role of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF in the function of the brain's dopamine systems. In an article recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience, University of Helsinki researchers establish that GDNF is an important physiological regulator of the functioning of the brain's dopamine neurons. (2017-02-15)

Hard choices? Ask your brain's dopamine
Salk researchers learn how dopamine governs ongoing decisions, yielding insights into Parkinson's, drug addiction. (2017-03-09)

Precise technique tracks dopamine in the brain
MIT researchers have devised a way to measure dopamine in the brain much more precisely than previously possible, which should allow scientists to gain insight into dopamine's roles in learning, memory, and emotion. (2017-03-03)

Breakthrough in the production of dopamine neurons for Parkinson's disease
Researchers at Lund University, Sweden, are rapidly moving towards the first ever transplantations of embryonic stem cell derived dopamine neurons in persons with Parkinson's disease. New findings published in Cell Stem Cell present how a more refined understanding of normal development leads to an improved method for obtaining the dopamine neurons needed for the first clinical trials. (2016-10-28)

Alcoholism may be caused by dynamical dopamine imbalance
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, Indiana University and the Russian Academy of Sciences Nizhny Novgorod Institute of Applied Physics have identified potential alcoholism mechanisms, associated with altered dopaminergic neuron response to complex dynamics of prefrontal cortex neurones affecting dopamine release. (2017-03-09)

Research reveals why some smokers become addicted with their first cigarette
Research from the University of Western Ontario reveals how the brain processes the (2008-08-05)

Dopamine conducts prefrontal cortex ensembles
New research in rodents reveals for the first time how dopamine changes the function of the brain's prefrontal cortex. In a study published today in the journal Cell Reports, researchers found that dopamine has little effect on individual cells. Instead, it generates sustained activity in the ensemble of cells in the prefrontal cortex that lasts for up to 20 minutes. (2019-04-02)

Are anxiety disorders all in the mind?
Using single-photon emission computed tomography, researchers in the Netherlands were able to detect biochemical differences in the brains of individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder, providing evidence of a long-suspected biological cause for the dysfunction. (2008-05-12)

Activating dopamine neurons could turn off binge-like eating behavior
While binge eating affects about 10 percent of adults in the United States, the neurobiological basis of the disease is unclear. Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital found that certain neural circuits have the ability to inhibit binge-like eating behavior in mice. Their report appears today in the journal Biological Psychiatry. (2016-08-08)

Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease
While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. (2017-12-22)

Low self-esteem connected to greater risk for opioid use
Health, family and romance problems appear to be the particular life stressors most associated with increased risk for using opioids to cope, and individuals with low self-esteem appear to be at risk for these connections, according to a new paper including researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York. (2018-10-03)

Brain's 'sixth sense' for calories discovered
The brain can sense the calories in food, independent of the taste mechanism, researchers have found in studies with mice. Their finding that the brain's reward system is switched on by this (2008-03-26)

Brain changes after menopause may lead to lack of physical activity
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found a connection between lack of ovarian hormones and changes in the brain's pleasure center, a hotspot in the brain that processes and reinforces messages related to reward, pleasure, activity and motivation for physical exercise. Findings suggest that activation of brain receptors in that part of the brain may serve as a future treatment to improve motivation for physical activity in postmenopausal women. (2016-07-28)

How dopamine drives brain activity
Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that can track dopamine levels, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences distant brain regions. (2020-04-01)

Cocaine's effects on brain metabolism may contribute to abuse
A new study conducted at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory suggests that cocaine's effects go beyond the dopamine system. (2008-02-18)

Better learning through zinc?
Zinc is a vital micronutrient involved in many cellular processes: For example, in learning and memory processes, it plays a role that is not yet understood. By using nanoelectrochemical measurements, Swedish researchers have made progress toward understanding by demonstrating that zinc influences the release of messenger molecules. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, zinc changes the number of messenger molecules stored in vesicles and the dynamics of their release from the cell. (2017-03-21)

Hunting for the brain's opioid addiction switch
New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle. The identification of these opiate-induced changes offers the best hope for developing more effective pharmacological targets and therapies to prevent or reverse the effect of opiate exposure and addiction. These results were presented at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, May 31, 2016, in Toronto, Canada. (2016-05-31)

Evolution of psychiatric disorders and human personality traits
How and why human-unique characteristics such as highly social behavior, languages and complex culture have evolved is a long-standing question. A research team led by Tohoku University in Japan has revealed the evolution of a gene related to such human-unique psychiatric traits. (2018-09-07)

Kent State research group publishes analysis of primate brains in top science journal
How different are human brains compared to the brains of other primates such as chimpanzees, gorillas and monkeys? Researchers in Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences recently co-authored an article with more than 30 scientists, led by Yale University, from the United States, Italy and Spain in the journal Science that describes some of the small, yet distinct differences between the species in how individual cells function and form connections. (2017-11-30)

How genes will save or fail birds in the face of climate change
A new study analyzing the genomes of yellow warblers in North America reveals how some subpopulations are more 'genetically vulnerable' to changes associated with climate change; furthermore, it finds that genes linked to exploratory and migratory behavior may be important for successful climate adaptation. (2018-01-04)

Meth promotes spread of virus in HIV-infected users
Researchers at the University at Buffalo have presented the first evidence that the addictive drug methamphetamine, or meth, also commonly known as (2006-08-04)

Comparison of primate brains hints at what makes us human
A detailed comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee and macaque brains reveals elements that make the human brain unique, including cortical circuits underlying production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-11-23)

Brain circuit that drives sleep-wake states, sleep-preparation behavior is identified
Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have identified a brain circuit that's indispensable to the sleep-wake cycle. This same circuit is also a key component of the reward system, an archipelago of interconnected brain clusters crucial to promoting behavior necessary for animals, including humans, to survive and reproduce. (2016-09-05)

Chronic adversity dampens dopamine production
People exposed to a lifetime of psychosocial adversity may have an impaired ability to produce the dopamine levels needed for coping with acutely stressful situations. (2019-11-12)

Mosquitoes remember human smells, but also swats, researchers find
A Virginia Tech study shows that mosquitoes can rapidly learn and remember the smells of hosts and that dopamine is a key mediator of this process. The study proved a mosquito's preference can shift if that person's smell is associated with an unpleasant sensation. (2018-01-25)

Evidence in mice that childhood asthma is influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine
Neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine communicate with T cells to enhance allergic inflammation in the lungs of young mice but not older mice, researchers report Nov. 19 in the journal Immunity. The findings potentially explain why asthma susceptibility is higher in children. By highlighting the important role of interactions between the nervous system and the immune system in childhood asthma, the results could lead to new strategies for treating the common chronic disease. (2019-11-19)

Detecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside the brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer
Detecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside the brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease. Sheffield scientists discover a loss of cells that use dopamine may cause part of the brain -- responsible for forming new memories -- to function less effectively. Findings could revolutionise screening for Alzheimer's disease, which affects more than 520,000 people in the UK. (2018-03-27)

Viewing dopamine receptors in their native habitat
A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane. (2020-06-11)

New dopamine sensors could help unlock the mysteries of brain chemistry
In 2018, Tian Lab at UC Davis Health developed dLight1, a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor. This sensor allows high resolution, real-time imaging of the spatial and temporal release of dopamine in live animals. Now, the team expanded the color spectrum of dLight1 to YdLight1 and RdLight1. The increased light penetration and imaging depth of these variants provide enhanced dopamine signal quality allowing researchers to optically dissect dopamine's release and model its effects on neural circuits. (2020-09-15)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.