Popular Drilling News and Current Events

Popular Drilling News and Current Events, Drilling News Articles.
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Scientists of the Samara Polytech have developed a new method for wells designing
The methodical approach of wells design, developed at the Oil and Gas Wells Drilling Department, will allow to obtain more accurate information about the field and predict problems that may arise during the operation on the well. (2019-01-23)

Drilling deeper
A new study shows Americans are drilling deeper than ever for fresh water. (2019-07-22)

Project Hotspot
In their study published in Lithosphere this week, James Kessler and colleagues examine the geology of a scientific borehole drilled into the Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA, to investigate the potential for geothermal energy at depth. The site discussed in this paper is on the Mountain Home Air Force Base, where a drillhole in 1984 indicated that geothermal fluids were present at about 1.8 km depth. (2017-04-05)

Pascali honored for contributions to engineering education
Raresh Pascali, instructional associate professor in the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program at the University of Houston, has been named the 2016 recipient of the Ross Kastor Educator Award. The award, named for a longtime drilling engineer with Shell Oil Co., is presented by the petroleum division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. It recognizes dedication to improving engineering and science awareness for students and improving educational opportunities for future industry leaders. (2016-05-17)

Research could lead to improved oil recovery, better environmental cleanup
Researchers have taken a new look at an old, but seldom-used technique developed by the petroleum industry to recover oil, and learned more about why it works, how it could be improved, and how it might be able to make a comeback not only in oil recovery but also environmental cleanup. (2012-08-02)

Scientists core into California's Clear Lake to explore past climate change
One of the oldest lakes in the world, Clear Lake in northern California has deep sediments that contain a record of the climate and local plants and animals going back perhaps 500,000 years. UC Berkeley scientists are drilling cores from the sediments to explore 130,000 years of this history and fine-tune models for predicting the fate of today's flora and fauna in the face of global warming and pressure from a growing human population. (2012-05-03)

UCF researchers develop first sypersymmetric laser array
A team of University of Central Florida researchers has overcome a long-standing problem in laser science, and the findings could have applications in surgery, drilling and 3D laser mapping. (2019-02-28)

Researchers identify technique that improves ACL surgery
Surgeons from Hospital for Special Surgery have identified a drilling technique that improves the outcome of surgery to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament. The news will be presented during the annual meeting of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine, June 9-12, in Keystone. Colo. (2009-07-09)

New Marcellus development boom will triple greenhouse gas emissions from PA's natural gas
Natural gas production on Pennsylvania's vast black shale deposit known as the Marcellus Shale will nearly double by 2030 to meet growing demand, tripling Pennsylvania's greenhouse gas emissions from the natural gas sector relative to 2012 levels, according to a report published today by Delaware Riverkeeper Network. The increase in greenhouse gas emissions will remain steady through 2045 with continued shale gas development, projects the report, 'Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Associated with Projected Future Marcellus Development.' (2017-01-18)

Orthopedic surgery simulation
A unique training simulator for orthopedic open surgery (knee reconstruction with total joint replacement) has been developed by OSSim Technologies Inc. in partnership with three University of Montreal orthopedic surgeons. (2016-01-07)

Scientists predict a new superhard material with unique properties
An international team of scientists have predicted a new superhard material that can be used in drilling, machine building and other fields. The new tungsten boride they discovered outperforms the widely used 'pobedit' ? a hard tungsten carbide and cobalt composite material with artificial diamond interspersing. (2018-06-15)

Earthquake in super slo-mo
A big earthquake occurred south of Istanbul in the summer of 2016, but it was so slow that nobody noticed. The earthquake, which took place at mid-crustal depth, lasted more than fifty days. Only a novel processing technique applied to data from special borehole strainmeter instruments and developed by researchers from the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and international colleagues from Turkey and the U.S. allowed to identify the ultra-slow quake below the Sea of Marmara. (2019-01-29)

New map profiles induced earthquake risk for West Texas
A map created by Stanford geophysicists can help predict which parts of West Texas and New Mexico may be at risk of fracking-induced earthquakes. The map could guide oil discovery efforts in the region. (2018-02-08)

Deep-ocean drilling researchers target earthquake and tsunami zone
Researchers fresh from an eight-week scientific drilling expedition off the Pacific coast of Japan today reported their discovery of strong variation in the tectonic stresses in a region notorious for generating devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, the Nankai Trough. The scientists reported their findings at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in San Francisco. (2007-12-12)

Research team draws 150-meter ice core from McCall Glacier
A 150-meter ice core pulled from the McCall Glacier in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge this summer may offer researchers their first quantitative look at up to two centuries of climate change in the region. (2008-07-10)

Data-driven shale dialogue
Research published in the journal Science examines a dialogue about shale drilling between concerned citizens, watershed groups, government regulators and personnel from large energy companies by focusing on publicly available water quality data. (2018-02-06)

Study finds no evidence of natural gas from fracking in Ohio drinking water
A study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling. Geologists with the University of Cincinnati examined drinking water in northeast Ohio where many residents rely on water from private underground wells. The time-series study was the first of its kind in Ohio. (2018-05-18)

Re-assessing Alaska's energy frontier
The new USGS assessment estimates 8.7 billion barrels of oil and 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas resources. (2017-12-22)

Evidence of glaciation in 'super greenhouse' world
US and European scientists have found evidence that glaciers existed during the (2008-01-10)

Retrieving climate history from the ice
In the context of a major European Union project, experts from 14 institutions in ten European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice, looking for the ideal site to investigate the climate history of the past 1.5 million years. Today, the consortium Beyond EPICA -- Oldest Ice (BE-OI), led by Olaf Eisen from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in Bremerhaven, presented its findings at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union in Vienna. (2019-04-09)

USGS estimates 8.5 billion barrels of oil in Texas' Eagle Ford Group
The Eagle Ford Group of Texas contains estimated means of 8.5 billion barrels of oil, 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to a new assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey. This estimate consists of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources in continuous accumulations. (2018-06-22)

Oil and gas wells as a strong source of greenhouse gases
Boreholes in the North Sea could constitute a significantly more important source of methane, a strong greenhouse gas, than previously thought. This is shown by a new study of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel recently published in the international peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology. As the authors state large amounts of methane are released from the sediments surrounding boreholes, probably over long periods of time. (2017-08-28)

Archaeologists to establish true value of Roman silver coins
An archaeologist at the University of Liverpool is examining more than 1,000 Roman silver coins from museums around the world in order to establish their true economic value. (2006-03-03)

Deep biosphere beneath the seafloor explored at American Geophysical Union fall meeting
The scientists are working to understand the nature of subseafloor microbial communities and whether these communities are unique. They're also researching where microbes in ocean crust come from and whether these microbes can provide clues about where to look for life on other planets. (2018-12-12)

NJIT Oil spill expert assesses use of deep-sea dispersants in Deepwater Horizon cleanup
In a groundbreaking study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, collaborators from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Texas A&M University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology pooled their scientific and technical expertise to provide some of the first answers to policy questions regarding the use of deep-sea dispersants. (2017-08-28)

Nanotechnology and nanopore sequencing
DNA is the hereditary material in our cells and contains the instructions for them to live, behave, grow, and develop. These instructions are based on the order of the DNA bases, called nucleotides. To unlock the instructions, carried by a DNA molecule, we need to read these nucleotide sequences (by performing DNA sequencing). (2017-02-22)

NJIT conducts the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill
A team of New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers is conducting the largest-ever simulation of the Deepwater Horizon spill to determine more precisely where hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil dispersed following the drilling rig's explosion in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. (2019-06-27)

Why the seafloor starts moving
When the seabed loses its stability and starts to move, it often happens in much larger dimensions than landslides ashore -- and at slopes with very low gradients. At the same time, discplacement of large amounts of sediment under water scan cause devastating tsunamis. However, why and when submarine landslides develop is hardly understood. Marine scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now published possible causes based on observations on submarine landslides off the coast of northwest Africa in the international journal Geology. (2018-02-13)

West Virginia groundwater not affected by fracking, but surface water is
Three years of fracking has not contaminated groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but accidental spills of wastewater from fracked wells may pose a threat to surface water, according to a study led by scientists at Duke University. The scientists used a broad suite of geochemical and isotopic tracers to sample for contaminants in 112 water wells near shale gas sites, including 20 wells that were sampled both before and after fracking began. (2017-04-24)

Drilling Project To Plumb Million Years Of Volcanic Island History
The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project is set to begin boring through 15,000 feet of lava flows on the Big Island of Hawaii March 15. The project--a collaborative effort of the University of Hawaii, University of California and California Institute of Technology--will analyze core samples dating back a million years to study mantle plumes and volcanic island formation. (1999-03-12)

Studies evaluate the anatomy and stability of ACL reconstruction with different techniques
An improved understanding of the anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in recent years has generated a renewed interest in the evaluation of surgical techniques to repair the knee ligament. In a study being presented at the 2009 American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine Specialty Day in Las Vegas, researchers analyzed various aspects of two of the most common ACL reconstruction techniques. (2009-02-28)

Russian scientists deny climate model of IPCC
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University revealed new data on accelerating permafrost degradation in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, which really threatens by huge emissions of bubble methane into the atmosphere and breaks the climate model of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Study findings were published in Nature Communications. (2017-08-15)

Acoustic imaging reveals hidden features of megathrust fault off Costa Rica
Geophysicists have obtained detailed three-dimensional images of a dangerous megathrust fault west of Costa Rica where two plates of the Earth's crust collide. The images reveal features of the fault surface, including long grooves or corrugations, that may determine how the fault will slip in an earthquake. (2018-02-12)

X-rays use diamonds as a window to the center of the Earth
Diamonds from Brazil have provided the answers to a question that Earth scientists have been trying to understand for many years: How is oceanic crust that has been subducted deep into the Earth recycled back into volcanic rocks? A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, working alongside colleagues at the STFC Daresbury Laboratory, have gained a deeper insight into how the Earth recycles itself in the deep earth tectonic cycle way beyond the depths that can be accessed by drilling. (2008-08-12)

A life cycle solution to fossil fuel impacts
research from the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering, published recently in Environmental Science & Technology, found that co-treatment of research from the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering, published recently in Environmental Science & Technology, found that co-treatment of acid mine drainage and produced fracking fluid may not only solve two environmental issues at once, but also reduce the environmental impact of both legacy wastes. (2018-11-27)

Oil biodegradation inhibited in deep-sea sediments
Degradation rates of oil were slower in the dark and cold waters of the depths of the Gulf of Mexico than at surface conditions, according to an international team of geoscientists trying to understand where the oil went during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (2018-07-19)

Experts call for more active prevention of tooth decay for children's teeth
Three-year trial comparing three treatment strategies for tooth decay in children's teeth finds no evidence to suggest that conventional fillings are more successful than sealing decay into teeth, or using preventive methods alone. 43% of those participating in the study experienced toothache or dental infection regardless of the treatment received. FiCTION is the largest study of its kind to date; with 1,144 children, their parents, and 72 NHS dental clinics in the UK involved. (2019-11-27)

Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The CSU team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study, published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, showed that these crops had weakened immune systems. (2019-10-31)

Micro-earthquakes preceding a 4.2 earthquake near Istanbul as early warning signs?
In a new study, led by Peter Malin and Marco Bohnhoff of the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences, the authors report on the observation of foreshocks that, if analyzed accordingly and in real-time, may possibly increase the early-warning time before a large earthquake from just a few seconds up to several hours. (2018-11-01)

US public views on climate and energy
Majorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little for key aspects of the environment. And most believe the US should focus on development of alternative sources of energy over expansion of fossil fuels, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. (2019-11-25)

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