Popular Drilling News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Drilling News and Current Events, Drilling News Articles.
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Filtering liquids with liquids saves electricity
Filtering and treating water accounts for about 13 percent of all electricity consumed in the US every year and releases about 290 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere annually. New research demonstrates that the Wyss Institute's liquid-gated membranes filter nanoclay particles out of water more efficiently than existing membranes and require less frequent replacement and less energy to operate, a solution that could reduce the cost and electricity consumption of high-impact industrial processes such as oil and gas drilling. (2018-11-07)

Competition for shrinking groundwater
Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world. (2018-11-14)

Shrimp claw inspires new method of underwater plasma generation
Texas A&M University researchers are looking to nature for inspiration in developing a new method of underwater plasma generation using shrimp as a model - a discovery that could provide significant improvements for actions ranging from water sterilization to drilling. (2019-03-28)

Biologists unlock 'black box' to underground world
A BYU biologist is part of a team of researchers that has unlocked the (2013-01-02)

Nanoparticles and magnets offer new, efficient method of removing oil from water
In a study published this spring in the Journal of Nanoparticle Research, engineering researchers used magnetic nanoparticles to separate oil from water through a simple process that relies on electrostatic force and a magnet. The engineers believe their new technique could improve water treatment for oil and gas production, more efficiently clean up oil spills and potentially remove lead from drinking water. (2017-06-07)

Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the central and eastern US
Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting. (2019-04-26)

Majorities see government efforts to protect the environment as insufficient
Majorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little to protect key aspects of the environment, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center. In a national survey of 2,541 US adults, 69 percent of Americans say the federal government isn't doing enough to protect water quality of lakes, rivers and streams and 64 percent say the same about air quality. Two-thirds (67 percent) say the government is doing too little to reduce the effects of climate change. (2018-05-14)

PA residents shoulder health impacts of state's oil and gas waste
More than 80 percent of all waste from Pennsylvania's oil and gas drilling operations stays inside the state, according to a new study that tracks the disposal locations of liquid and solid waste from these operations across 26 years. Numerous human health hazards have been associated with waste from oil and gas extraction, including potential exposure to compounds known to cause cancer. (2019-04-22)

No volcanic winter in East Africa from ancient Toba eruption
The Toba supereruption on the island of Sumatra about 74,000 years ago did not cause a six-year-long 'volcanic winter' in East Africa and thereby cause the human population in the region to plummet, according to new research based on an analysis of ancient plant remains from lake cores. The new findings disagree with the Toba catastrophe hypothesis, which says the eruption and its aftermath caused drastic, multi-year cooling and severe ecological disruption in East Africa. (2018-02-06)

Oregon scientists drill into white graphene to create artificial atoms
By drilling holes into a thin two-dimensional sheet of hexagonal boron nitride with a gallium-focused ion beam, University of Oregon scientists have created artificial atoms that generate single photons, which work in air and room temperature. (2019-04-11)

ESA tipsheet for June 2018
This is the ESA tipsheet for June 2018. (2018-05-30)

Dryer, less predictable environment may have spurred human evolution
Evidence of a variable but progressively drying climate coincides with a major shift in stone-tool-making abilities and the appearance of modern Homo sapiens. Sediment cores obtained by the Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project provide the first continuous environmental context for the diverse archeological evidence recovered from nearby localities in the East African rift valley. (2018-10-08)

Measuring methane from coal and gas in Pennsylvania informative
While methane pollution caused by natural gas production in Pennsylvania is underestimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas still has half the carbon footprint of underground coal mining, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-05-23)

Moderate warming could melt East Antarctic Ice Sheet
Parts of the world's largest ice sheet would melt if Antarctic warming of just 2°C is sustained for millennia, according to international research. University of Queensland scientist Dr Kevin Welsh was part of a team that used evidence from warm periods in Earth's history to see how the East Antarctic Ice Sheet might react to a warming climate. (2018-09-19)

How marine snow cools the planet
Researchers at the University of Sydney have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Andria Dutkiewicz warns that global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere. (2019-03-13)

Big data approach to water quality applied at shale drilling sites
A computer program is diving deep into water quality data from Pennsylvania, helping scientists detect potential environmental impacts of Marcellus Shale gas drilling. (2016-12-07)

Discovery sheds new light on cause of earthquakes
Research at the University of Liverpool into a large fault zone in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile has produced new insight into how fluid pressure can cause earthquakes. (2006-12-13)

ODP scientists say no large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets 41 million years ago
New research to test global ice volume approximately 41.6 million years ago shows that ice caps at this time, if they existed at all, would have been small and easily accommodated on Antarctica. (2007-08-22)

Magma power for geothermal energy?
When a team of scientists drilling near an Icelandic volcano hit magma in 2009, they had to abandon their planned experiments on geothermal energy. But the mishap could point the way to an alternative source of geothermal power. (2011-02-17)

Firmware at the blink of an eye: Scientists develop new technology of alloy steel rolling
A research team from the NUST MISIS Department of Pressure Metal Treatment has developed a new technology which simplifies the process of hot rolling seamless pipes made of alloy and high-alloy steel. The consistent use of two simple male punches, tools that turn an unruly steel blank into a hollow ''sleeve'', is a distinctive feature of the technology. (2018-09-19)

Economists price BP oil spill damage to natural resources at $17.2 billion
The BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was the largest maritime oil spill in US history. Almost seven years to the day after the start of the environmental disaster, researchers have published a price tag of the damage done to natural resources: $17.2 billion. (2017-04-20)

Microscopic glass blowing used to make tiny optical lenses
Inserting air into hot glass to form a bubble has been used to make glass objects since Roman times. In new work, researchers apply these same glass blowing principles on a microscopic scale to make specialized miniature cone-shaped lenses known as axicons. (2019-06-25)

Electrical water detection
A quick and easy way to detect groundwater in semi-arid hard rock areas that is also economical could improve the siting of borewells to improve clean water supply in the developing world. Details of the approach are outlined in the International Journal of Hydrology Science and Technology this month. (2011-06-22)

New exploration method for geothermal energy
Where to drill? This is the basic question in the exploration of underground energy resources, such as geothermal energy. A research team with participation of GFZ Potsdam presents a new method for locating potential drilling sites that are covered by water. The new approach combines bathymetry measurements with geochemical profiles. (2019-11-12)

How the Earth's Pacific plates collapsed
Scientists drilling into the ocean floor have for the first time found out what happens when one tectonic plate first gets pushed under another. The international expedition drilled into the Pacific ocean floor and found distinctive rocks formed when the Pacific tectonic plate changed direction and began to plunge under the Philippine Sea Plate about 50 million years ago. (2015-11-23)

New metamaterial can switch from hard to soft -- and back again
When a material is made, you typically cannot change whether that material is hard or soft. But a group of University of Michigan researchers have developed a new way to design a 'metamaterial' that allows the material to switch between being hard and soft without damaging or altering the material itself. (2017-01-23)

World's Most Studied Glacier Surges Again
The world's most studied glacier surged recently at least four years ahead of when scientists were expecting it to. Geophysical Institute Professor Will Harrison has studied the Variegated Glacier for nearly 25 years. His research has contributed to thescientists' understanding of surging glaciers (1996-10-10)

Seismic mapping helps detect abandoned mines in Wyoming
At the 2017 Seismological Society of America's (SSA) Annual Meeting, Jamey Turner of Fugro will discuss his team's efforts to locate mining voids, which can pose a risk to buildings, roads and other infrastructure. (2017-04-11)

Mount Sinai researcher identifies best practices for cochlear implant hearing preservation
Findings could transform treatment worldwide and enhance patient care. (2017-06-26)

Oxygen levels on early Earth rose, fell several times before great oxidation even
Earth's oxygen levels rose and fell more than once hundreds of millions of years before the planetwide success of the Great Oxidation Event about 2.4 billion years ago, new research from the University of Washington shows. (2018-07-09)

A steady increase in the water footprint at US fracking sites
Water use for hydraulic fracturing (commonly referred to as 'fracking') in the US has been increasing at individual facilities in recent years, even as unconventional oil and gas production has more broadly declined, a new study reports. The findings emphasize the importance of water management at fracking operations, particularly if the prices of oil and natural (2018-08-15)

US groundwater in peril: Potable supply less than thought
Many rural areas in parts of the US rely exclusively on groundwater for both agricultural and domestic use. Drilling deeper wells may not be a good long-term solution to compensate for increasing demands on groundwater, because there is potential for contamination of deep fresh and brackish water in areas where the oil and gas industry injects wastewaters into or in close proximity to aquifers. The study was published Nov. 14 in Environmental Research Letters. (2018-11-28)

Copper-bottomed deposits
Researchers at UNIGE have studied over 100,000 combinations to establish the depth and number of years required for magma to produce a given amount of copper. The same scientists have also devised a model that can detect the quantity of copper held in a deposit by means of a simple factor analysis. The research will make it possible to estimate the potential for mining the metal before beginning any drilling. (2017-03-15)

International ocean drilling expedition to understand causes of the Indian Ocean 2004 earthquake
The devastating earthquake that struck North Sumatra and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands on Boxing Day in 2004 was caused by a slip on a subduction zone plate boundary fault beneath the eastern Indian Ocean. Now, a team of international researchers return to offshore Sumatra to collect marine sediments, rocks and fluids for the first time to collect data for predicting how these materials behave in fault zones to generate large earthquakes. (2016-08-08)

Analyzing effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) & polyethylene glycol (PEG)
Nowadays, the maintenance of wellbore stability is a very important activity in the drilling industry. Wellbore stability can be improved by designing proper drilling fluid. (2018-07-03)

Emerging techniques put a new twist on ankle repair
People with ankle injuries who do not respond successfully to initial treatment may have a second chance at recovery, thanks to two new procedures. (2009-07-01)

Study identifies source of oil sheens near Deepwater Horizon site
A chemical analysis indicates that the source of oil sheens recently found floating at the ocean's surface near the site of the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill is pockets of oil trapped within the wreckage of the sunken rig. (2013-07-16)

This Week from AGU: Coal mine dust lowers spectral reflectance of Arctic snow
This Week from AGU: Coal mine dust lowers spectral reflectance of Arctic snow. (2017-02-01)

Researchers report successful riser-drilling operations in seismogenic zone
For the first time in the history of scientific ocean drilling, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program conducted operations using the riser capabilities of the Japan-sponsored research vessel, CHIKYU, to successfully drill down to a depth of 1,603.7 meters beneath the sea floor (at water depth of 2,054 meters), in an earthquake-generating zone. (2009-07-30)

Dry conditions in East Africa half a million years ago possibly shaped human evolution, study finds
Samples of ancient sediments from a lake basin in East Africa have revealed that arid conditions developed in the area around half a million years ago, an environmental change that could have played a major role in human evolution and influenced advances in stone technology, according to an international research team that includes geologists from Georgia State University. (2018-10-17)

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