Popular Drosophila News and Current Events

Popular Drosophila News and Current Events, Drosophila News Articles.
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Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)

WSU researchers see human immune response in the fruit fly
Washington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines. (2018-06-19)

Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. His discovery gives hope to Parkinson's patients. This research was done in collaboration with colleagues from Northern Illinois University and will be published this evening on the website of the authoritative journal Science. (2012-05-11)

Even flies like a familiar song
The process that allows sounds experienced during infancy to shape language is poorly understood. Researchers at Nagoya University found that courtship behavior in Drosophila melanogaster can be shaped by earlier auditory experiences. Their findings allowed them to develop a novel and simple neurological model to study how experiences of sound can shape complex modes of communication in animals. (2018-03-20)

New study demonstrates importance of studying sleep and eating in tandem
A new study offers important insights into possible links between sleep and hunger. (2017-10-13)

Uncovering a reversible master switch for development
In a paper published in Genes & Development, BWH principal investigator Mitzi Kuroda, PhD, and her team identified a reversible 'master switch' on most developmental genes. The team unearthed this biological insight through studies in the fruit fly -- a powerful model organism for studying how human genes are organized and function. (2017-11-13)

The sixth Ttaste?
UCSB biologists enhance the scientific understanding of calcium taste (2018-01-03)

CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. (2019-02-26)

New genes on 'deteriorating' Y chromosome
Decoding Y chromosomes is difficult even with latest sequencing technologies. The question which genes lie on the chromosome and where they came from is hotly debated. Using a new analysis method, scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna made a crucial breakthrough. They showed that genetic material in fruit flies is often transferred to the Y chromosome from other chromosomes. Although largely a result of 'accidents', some of these transfers create functional genes. Published in PNAS. (2017-10-25)

Relocation of proteins with a new nanobody tool
Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have developed a new method by which proteins can be transported to a new location in a cell. The novel tool enables scientists to study the function of proteins depending on their position by using nanobodies. The tool can be used for a wide range of proteins and in various areas of developmental biology. The scientific journal eLife has published the results. (2017-04-11)

Turning back the aging clock
By boosting genes that destroy defective mitochondrial DNA, researchers can slow down and potentially reverse an important part of the aging process. (2016-11-21)

Low protein diet in early life increases lifespan in fruit flies
Fruit flies raised on a low protein diet early in life can live over twice as long as their peers. (2017-11-09)

NUP160 genetic mutation linked to steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome
Mutations in the NUP160 gene, which encodes one protein component of the nuclear pore complex nucleoporin 160 kD, are implicated in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, an international team reports March 25, 2019, in JASN. (2019-03-26)

Enzyme with surprising dual function
Scientists at the University of Bonn have clarified a surprising dual function of ceramide synthase. The enzyme not only catalyzes a central step of the production of vital lipids. It also has the ability to turn genes involved in lipid metabolism on or off. The study is being published in the renowned journal 'Cell Reports'. (2018-01-23)

Peptide papers point to new ways of tackling bacteria
A team of researchers have solved a 20-year riddle of how a crucial step in the biosynthesis of 'last-resort' antibiotics occurs. The researchers have opened the way to potentially redesigning the antibiotics by altering the peptide assembly involved. This work is linked by a common enzymatic machinery that has great potential to produce highly complex bioactive molecules. (2019-01-28)

'Sleeping' stem cells could aid brain repair
Scientists at the Wellcome Trust/ Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, have identified a new type of stem cell in the brain which they say has a high potential for repair following brain injury or disease. (2018-04-05)

'Birth control' for centrioles
Like DNA, centrioles need to duplicate only once per cell cycle. Rogers et al. uncover a long-sought mechanism that limits centriole copying, showing that it depends on the timely demolition of a protein that spurs the organelles' replication. (2009-01-26)

How E. coli evolves to adapt to changing acidity
Forthcoming in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology are a fascinating new selection of papers collects leading experimental research in evolution and artificial selection, providing insight into how organisms adapt to changing environmental conditions and fluctuations. (2007-05-29)

Enzyme key to learning in fruit flies
University of California, Riverside-led research finds enzyme that is key to learning in fruit flies. The finding could have applications in fight against memory related disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder, and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Huntington's. (2017-02-07)

Molecular biology: Phaser neatly arranges nucleosomes
LMU researchers have, for the first time, systematically determined the positioning of the packing units of the fruit fly genome, and discovered a new protein that defines their relationship to the DNA sequence. (2018-11-02)

Researchers find diffusion plays unusual signaling role in drosophila embryos
Researchers have found that diffusion plays an unexpected role in cell differentiation during the early stages of development in the embryos of Drosophila, or fruit flies. Instead of spreading a molecular signal out, it was found that diffusion, facilitated through a carrier molecule, actually concentrates the signal in one place. (2017-11-16)

How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls
Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. For decades, researchers have searched for their origins and now a Swedish-American research team has succeeded. They have also discovered that fruit flies in the wild are far more picky than their domesticated counterparts, a factor that long ago probably prompted the flies to move in with people. (2018-12-07)

Behavioral biology: Ripeness is all
In contrast to other members of the Drosophila family, the spotted-wing fly D. suzukii deposits its eggs in ripe fruits. Biologists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have now elucidated the sensory basis of their ability to exploit a novel ecological niche. (2017-03-10)

Rochester scientists discover gene controlling genetic recombination rates
Genetic recombination is vital to natural selection, yet some species display far more crossover than others. Scientists in Rochester have discovered a gene in fruit flies that is responsible for the evolution of these recombination rates. (2018-04-20)

Controlling ceramides could help treat heart disease
SBP researchers have discovered that accumulation of ceramides--a type of lipid (fat)-- plays a crucial role in lipotoxic cardiomyopathy (LCM)--a heart condition that often occurs in patients with diabetes and obesity. The study, published in Cell Reports, also identified several potential therapeutic targets that could prevent or reverse the effects of LCM. (2018-03-06)

Alzheimer plaque affects different brain cells differently
Amyloid beta, a protein linked with Alzheimer's disease, has different properties in different cell types in the brains of fruit flies. This is the conclusion of a study led by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden. While amyloid beta is highly toxic for nerve cells, it seems that certain other types of cell are hardly damaged at all by aggregates of the protein. (2018-04-13)

The origins of asymmetry: A protein that makes you do the twist
Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand. An international team led by a CNRS researcher has shown how a single protein induces a spiral motion in another molecule. Through a domino effect, this causes cells, organs, and indeed the entire body to twist, triggering lateralized behaviour. (2018-11-22)

MSU-based bioinformaticians studied the evolution of broken genes in a fruit fly
Pseudogenes lose their ability to encode proteins and natural selection stops to notice them, as no mutations in such genes can be harmful. A study conducted with the participation of the specialists from the Faculty of Bioengineering and Bioinformatics, MSU (Lomonosov Moscow State University) confirms this fact but shows that natural selection still has certain influence on some of such genes. An article about it was published in Genome Biology and Evolution journal. (2018-03-27)

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds
A new study sheds light on the mystery of how evolution tweaks the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers. (2018-07-11)

New insights into pruning
When an organism develops, non-specific connections between nerve cells degenerate. Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence (University of M√ľnster, Germany) have now discovered that the spatial organization of a nerve cell influences the degeneration of its cell processes. The study has been published in Development. (2018-06-26)

Revealed: The biochemical pathways of kidney disease
In a study, recently published in PLOS Genetics, Chiara Gamberi and her coauthors developed an innovative fruit fly-based model of the types of harmful cysts that can form on kidneys. The model has enormous potential for assisting the study of how cells proliferate in polycystic kidney disease and cancer. (2017-05-02)

Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumour growth
Researchers headed by Jordi Casanova at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) now demonstrate that genes activated during metastasis are also able to initiate primary tumour development, and they explain the molecular mechanism involved. Made using the fly model Drosophila melanogaster, this finding has been published in PloS Genetics this week. (2018-02-20)

Biologists decipher a key piece of the odor-detection puzzle in flies, mosquitoes
Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have discovered surprisingly that the complex odor-detecting machinery of the fruit fly Drosophila is heavily influenced by one specific odor receptor. This same receptor also exists in crop-damaging fly species and disease-carrying mosquitoes, opening the possibility for new chemical cocktails to control pests and render people (2018-02-08)

Illuminating the mysterious cultures of fruit flies
The lady fruit flies that inhabit your banana bowl may find green-colored mates with curly wings simply irresistible -- conforming to the 'local dating culture' of generations of female flies before them, a new study finds. (2018-11-29)

It's all in your head: Brain protein targeted for alcoholism cure
University of Houston chemist Joydip Das is reporting a cure for alcoholism could be found in a protein inside the brain that plays a big role in developing tolerance to drinking. (2018-06-05)

Fruit fly species can learn each other's dialects
Fruit flies from different species can warn each other when parasitic wasps are near. But according to a new study led by Balint Z. Kacsoh of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, published July 19th in PLOS Genetics, they are more likely to get the message across if the fly species have previously cohabited and learned each other's dialects. (2018-07-19)

Key player in cell metabolism identified
Published in Nature Cell Biology (NCB), the study shows that the EXD2 protein is critical for the mitochondria, the cell's powerhouses, to produce energy. This protein was previously thought to be located in the cell nucleus and to be involved in DNA repair. The results contribute to our basic understanding of mitochondria and suggest that EXD2 could be important for fertility and represent a potential target for cancer therapy. (2018-01-16)

How developing visual system axons stay in the correct layer
Little is known about how axons in the developing visual system stabilize their connections upon reaching the correct layer, but scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), led by Associate Professor Takashi Suzuki, have identified two proteins that provide layer-specific stabilization. (2017-12-08)

Key protein in sperm tail assembly identified
A study, published in the Journal of Cell Biology, focuses on the development of the sperm tail, the structure that enables sperm cells to swim and is therefore critical for male fertility. (2018-05-11)

How circadian clocks communicate with each other
Multiple biological clocks control the daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in animals and humans. Whether and how these clocks are connected with each other is still a largely open question. A new study now shows that a central clock governs the circadian rhythms in certain cases. (2017-05-30)

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