Popular Drug Development News and Current Events

Popular Drug Development News and Current Events, Drug Development News Articles.
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How do metals interact with DNA?
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia González from the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from the Uppsala University, have developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA. (2017-03-22)

Drug safety for penguins
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease. (2017-08-04)

OptiNose presents data on highly effective migraine treatment
OptiNose AS will present new Phase II data at the American Headache Society meeting in Boston on June 28. The Phase II clinical trial studied the safety and efficacy of sumatriptan, a migraine drug, when delivered to the nose by the OptiNose powder delivery device. The OptiNose and sumatriptan combination produced efficacy results comparable to previously published results on sumatriptan injections, the fastest (and also most painful) migraine treatment currently available. (2008-06-28)

Prescription drug labels provide scant dosing guidance for obese kids
Despite the US Congress providing incentives to drug manufacturers to encourage the study of medications in children, few approved drugs include safe dosing information for obese kids. (2018-01-19)

Hitgen and Cancer Research UK's Manchester Institute enter license agreement in lung cancer
Cancer Research UK, Cancer Research Technology (CRT), the charity's commercial arm, and HitGen Ltd, a privately held biotech company focused on early drug discovery, announced today that they have entered into a licence agreement to develop a novel class of drugs against lung cancer. (2017-02-27)

'Chemsex' needs to become a public health priority
Chemsex -- sex under the influence of illegal drugs -- needs to become a public health priority, argue experts in The BMJ this week. (2015-11-03)

Critical heart drug too pricey for some Medicare patients
An effective drug to treat chronic heart failure may cost too much for senior citizens with a standard Medicare Part D drug plan, said a study co-authored by a John A. Burns School of Medicine researcher at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The therapy is a combination of sacubitril/valsartan called Entresto®. Researchers found that, even with insurance, the cost to Medicare patients may be more than $1,600 a year. (2019-07-22)

Major drug initiatives are best way to curb threat from parasites
Large-scale programmes to treat a life-threatening disease could improve the health of millions despite concerns about their long-term effects, a study suggests. (2017-01-25)

Why the bar needs to be raised for human clinical trials
Standards for authorizing first-time trials of drugs in humans are lax, and should be strengthened in several ways, McGill University researchers argue in a paper published today in Nature. (2017-01-30)

Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect. (2019-04-11)

3-D tissue model of developing heart could help drug safety testing for pregnant women
A Syracuse University engineering team has developed a process that combines biomaterials-based cell patterning and stem cell technology to make a 3-D tissue model that could mimic early stage human heart development. Embryotoxicity is just one potential use of the modeling platform. (2018-03-16)

Antibacterial combination could fight drug-resistant tuberculosis
Pairing the antibiotic ceftazidime with the enzyme inhibitor avibactam may be an effective treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis, a new study reports. This antibacterial drug combination -- already in clinical use for Gram-negative bacterial infections -- could aid in stemming the growing global drug-resistant tuberculosis crisis. (2017-08-30)

New technology: Edible QR code can be the medicine of the future
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed a new method for the production of medicine. They print medical drugs in QR coded patterns onto an edible material. The production can be tailored to fit each patient and has the potential to protect against wrong medication and fake medicine according to the researchers. (2018-02-02)

One in 10 people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprints
Scientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 percent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints -- despite never using them. (2018-03-22)

Are women really under-represented in clinical trials?
Several studies have reported a lack of gender diversity in clinical trials, with trials including mostly adult males; however, a recent review of publicly available registration data of clinical trials at the US Food and Drug Administration for the most frequently prescribed drug classes found no evidence of any systemic significant under-representation of women. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2018-01-11)

Bacterial outer membrane vesicles: An emerging tool in vaccine development
Outer membrane vesicles, biological nanoparticles shed during normal growth by bacteria, have seen significant recent advances in engineering and are thus finding new utility as therapeutic and drug delivery agents. One specific research focus explored recently in the literature is the use of bacterial vesicles as adjuvants in vaccine formulations. (2017-09-26)

Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care
A novel approach to making therapeutic proteins allows medicine to be developed in a suitcase-size system. (2018-07-10)

Study reveals how antiepileptic drug causes problems during pregnancy
During pregnancy, use of the antiepileptic drug valproic acid has been associated with worse outcomes -- including fetal loss, impaired growth, major congenital malformations, increased risk of developmental problems, and autism -- compared with all other antiepileptic drugs. (2018-04-19)

Cell culture system could offer cancer breakthrough
A new cell culture system that provides a tool for preclinical cancer drug development and screening has been developed by researchers in the USA. The team, led by scientists from Princeton University, N.J., created a microfluidic cell culture device that allows the direct, real-time observation of the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. (2017-08-29)

New book on Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance from CSHLPress
'Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance' from CSHLPress examines the major classes of antibiotics, together with their modes of action and mechanisms of resistance. Well-established antibiotics (e.g., β-lactams) are covered, as are lesser-used drugs that have garnered recent interest (e.g., polymyxins) and new compounds in the development pipeline. Also examined is how bacteria evolve ways to resist disruptions by modifying the drug or drug target or by controlling access of the drug to the cell. (2016-08-17)

First proof a synthesized antibiotic is capable of treating superbugs
A 'game changing' new antibiotic which is capable of killing superbugs has been successfully synthesized and used to treat an infection for the first time -- and could lead to the first new class of antibiotic drug in 30 years. (2018-03-23)

Radiation-guided nanoparticles zero in on metastatic cancer
Zap a tumor with radiation to trigger expression of a molecule, then attack that molecule with a drug-loaded nanoparticle. (2016-06-29)

Completing the drug design jigsaw
A powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects. (2017-10-05)

Mefloquine effectively prevents malaria during pregnancy but is not well tolerated
The antimalarial drug mefloquine is more effective than the currently recommended treatment to prevent malaria infection in pregnant women living in endemic countries of sub-Saharan Africa, but the high frequency of adverse events represents a barrier to its use. These are the conclusions of a meta-analysis performed by ISGlobal -- a centre supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- and published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, a leading journal in systematic reviews on health issues. (2018-04-05)

Lighting the way: Sensors show drug uptake
When designing and characterizing new drugs, a key aspect is making sure the drug actually goes where it is intended to. But current tests for drug uptake monitor the process under unrealistic conditions and do not provide information on the amounts of drugs that cross into a cell. Now, one group reports in ACS Sensors that fluorescent detector proteins can overcome these challenges. (2017-08-02)

Breathing problems linked to drug that treats opioid addiction
A drug used to treat opioid addiction could cause breathing problems in some obese patients, according to a new study from UT scientists. (2018-02-01)

McMaster University engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordable
McMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public. (2018-02-09)

Seeking a better way to design drugs
With a three-year, $346,000 award from the National Institutes of Health, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Led by Marion Emmert, Ph.D., will seek to advance the development of a chemical process that could significantly improve the ability to design new pharmaceuticals and streamline the manufacturing of existing drugs. The early-stage technology may yield a more efficient and predictable way of bonding aromatic and benzylic amines to a drug molecule. (2015-09-23)

UTMB develops promising anti-obesity drug that shrinks fat without suppressing appetite
Given the ever-increasing obesity epidemic, researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a promising developing drug that has been shown to selectively shrink excess fat by increasing fat cell metabolism. The drug significantly reduces body weight and blood cholesterol levels without lowering food intake in obese mice, according to a recent study published in Biochemical Pharmacology. (2018-01-04)

Study estimates R&D spending on bringing new cancer drug to market
Research and development costs are a common justification for high cancer drug prices and a new study published by JAMA Internal Medicine offers an updated estimate of the spending needed to bring a drug to the US market. (2017-09-11)

Discovery of new Hepatitis C virus mechanism
Researchers at Osaka University, Japan uncovered the mechanisms that suppress the propagation of the hepatitis C virus with the potential of improving pathological liver conditions. Using model mice, they confirmed that when a certain enzyme is inhibited, HCV particle production is reduced leading to an improvement of pathological liver conditions. They thereby identified a new drug target for the development of new HCV drugs. (2016-07-27)

Could targeting oxtyocin help treat opioid addiction?
A new review of published research indicates that the oxytocin system -- a key player in social reward and stress regulation -- is profoundly affected by opioid use. Therefore, it may be an important target for developing medications to treat opioid addiction and to prevent relapse. (2017-04-05)

Using drugs for different diseases than initially intended for
Thousands of drugs have the potential to be effective against other diseases than they were developed for. New scientific work points to ca. 30,000 such cases. One is currently used to treat schizophrenia but holds great potential for treating tuberculosis as well. (2016-11-29)

Topiramate in early pregnancy increases risk of oral clefts
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest that using topiramate in early pregnancy, particularly at the high doses used for epilepsy, increases the risk of oral clefts. Their results are published in Neurology. (2017-12-28)

Researchers computationally find the needle in a haystack to treat rare diseases
One in 10 people in America is fighting a rare disease, or a disorder that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans. Researchers have developed a sophisticated and systematic way to identify existing drugs that can be repositioned to treat a rare disease or condition. (2018-03-13)

Anti-cancer flower power
Tel Aviv University researchers are combating cancer with a jasmine-based drug. (2008-08-25)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

Medication that treats parasite infection also has anti-cancer effect
Researchers in Japan and the United States find ivermectin, a drug used to kill parasites, suppresses tumor development in epithelial ovarian cancer (2017-09-28)

Clinical trial identifies new breast cancer drug as a potential therapy for glioblastoma
Ivy Brain Tumor Center at the Barrow Neurological Institute, has released the results of its recent Phase 0 clinical trial of the breast cancer drug ribociclib (Kisqali®) for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. The agent, recently approved by the FDA for advanced breast cancer, is part of a newly-discovered class of targeted therapy that undermines cancer cell division and could form the backbone of a new drug cocktail for patients with malignant brain tumors like glioblastoma. (2019-07-25)

Diabetes drug 'significantly reverses memory loss' in mice with Alzheimer's
A drug developed for diabetes could be used to treat Alzheimer's after scientists found it 'significantly reversed memory loss' in mice through a triple method of action. This is the first time that a triple receptor drug has been used which acts in multiple ways to protect the brain from degeneration. It combines three growth factors. Problems with growth factor signalling have been shown to be impaired in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. (2017-12-31)

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