Popular Drug Development News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Drug Development News and Current Events, Drug Development News Articles.
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Potential new treatment for drug addiction relapse revealed
Research published in Addiction Biology by scientists at the University of Bath reveals a new potential mechanism for combatting drug addiction relapse. (2018-06-12)

Fifteen percent of osteoporosis patients who take 'drug holidays' suffer bone fractures
A Loyola Medicine study has found that 15.4 percent of patients who take so-called 'drug holidays' from osteoporosis drugs called bisphosphonates experienced bone fractures. During a six-year follow-up period, the yearly incidence of fractures ranged from 3.7 percent to 9.9 percent, with the most fractures occurring during the fourth and fifth years. (2018-05-04)

Investigational drug study may determine if lung cancer is preventable in cigarette smokers
Researchers at The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University are seeking participants for a National Cancer Institute-sponsored study of an investigational drug that may prevent cigarette smokers from developing cancer. (2000-10-11)

A summary of electrospun nanofibers as drug delivery system
Recently, electrospun polymeric nanofibers have proven to be an interesting strategy for drug delivery systems application.This review presents an overview of the reported drugs loaded into polymeric nanofibers, to be used as drug delivery systems. (2018-12-14)

OU team develops new antibiotic to fight MRSA
A University of Oklahoma team of chemists has developed a new antibiotic formulation to fight the sometimes deadly staph infection caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA and other antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria. The new drug to treat MRSA combines traditional Food and Drug Administration-approved antibiotics, such as methicillin, with the polymer BPEI. (2016-05-18)

New tool to assess largely ignored risk in pharmaceutical industry
A new method to test the likelihood of a drug turning into a potentially harmful version of itself when it enters the body has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University. (2018-01-05)

Russian scientists have studied the genes that allow cancer cells to resist drugs
Researchers from the People's Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University) have studied the mechanism of drug resistance for ovarian and breast cancer cells. They discovered that these cancer cells have redox-dependent mechanism which is tasked with sustaining their drug resistance. The results have been published in two articles in the journal of Free Radical Biology and Medicine. (2017-09-22)

Sclerosis medicine can fight multi-resistant bacteria
A surprising discovery shows that a widely used and 20-year-old medicine used to treat multiple sclerosis can also beat a type of multi-resistant bacteria for which there are currently only a few effective drugs. The result may be of significance for the treatment of patients and in the battle against resistant bacteria. (2017-11-22)

Study estimates misuse of prescribed opioids in the United States
A new Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety study estimates the prevalence and risk factors for self-reported misuse of prescribed opioids in the general adult population. (2019-02-06)

Many epilepsy patients take drug combinations that interact
In an Epilepsia analysis of 2008-2010 Medicare claims data, one in four older Americans with new-onset epilepsy and more than one-third with prevalent epilepsy received a combination of antiepileptic drugs and non-epilepsy drugs that could interact to alter the effectiveness of the non-epilepsy drugs. Also, more than 1 in 5 patients received a drug combination that could alter the effect of the antiepileptic drugs and potentially cause toxicity. (2018-02-07)

'Heart-on-a-chip' process aims to speed up drug testing
Testing new clinical drugs' effect on heart tissue could become quicker and more straightforward, thanks to new research from Harvard University. The study, published today in the journal Biofabrication, sets out a new, faster method for manufacturing a 'heart-on-a-chip,' which can be used to test the reaction of heart tissue to external stimuli. (2018-01-16)

Drug-related mortality rates are not randomly distributed across the US
Between 2006 and 2015 there were more than 515,000 deaths from drug overdoses and other drug-related causes in the US. The economic, social, and emotional tolls of these deaths are substantial, but some parts of the US are bearing heavier burdens than others. Evidence from the first national study of county-level differences suggests that addressing economic and social conditions will be key to reversing the rising tide of drug deaths, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2018-03-26)

UMN Medical School study uncovers new findings on antimicrobial drug synergy
New data from a study led by researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School could change how future antimicrobial drug combinations are discovered and developed. (2018-03-27)

Space station crew cultivates crystals for drug development
Crew members aboard the International Space Station will begin conducting research this week to improve the way we grow crystals on Earth. (2017-03-31)

New guidelines on clinical trial design for patients with brain metastases
New guidelines from an international, multidisciplinary group published in the journal Lancet Oncology describe how to most appropriately address cancer patients with CNS involvement within clinical trials of anti-cancer drugs. (2017-12-29)

Re-introducing an 'old' antibiotic may help fight multi-drug resistant bacteria
A new study indicates that the drug fosfomycin may be effective for treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In most European countries, the oral formulation is only approved as a 3 gram single dose for the treatment of uncomplicated cystitis; however the Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study found that a dosing regimen of 6-12 grams per day divided in 3 doses is required for the treatment of systemic multi-drug-resistant bacterial infections. (2018-02-07)

Study suggests failed osteoarthritis drug could help treat opioid addiction
A study from Indiana University suggests that a drug proven safe for use in people may prevent opioid tolerance and physical dependence when used with opioid-based pain medications. (2018-02-27)

Rapid increase of synthetic opioids involved in drug overdose deaths
Synthetic opioids (such as illicit fentanyl) overtook prescription opioids in 2016 as the most common drug class involved in overdose deaths in the United States. (2018-05-01)

New Tulane University drug effective against malaria
Tulane University researchers have developed a new drug that is effective against non-severe cases of malaria, according to results from an FDA-supervised clinical trial published in the latest issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases. The results are significant as public health experts have long warned that the parasite responsible for most malaria cases, Plasmodium falciparum, is developing resistance to widely used treatments. New medications are needed to build up secondary defenses against drug-resistant strains of the parasite. (2017-09-12)

Opioid crisis leads to rise in viable hearts and lungs for those awaiting transplants
A new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and University of Utah, examines survival outcomes for patients who have received organs from donors who died of drug intoxication. (2018-05-16)

'Forgotten' antibiotic offers hope against worst superbugs
An antibiotic overlooked since its discovery 40 years ago could help develop new drugs against life-threatening infections caused by some of the world's most dangerous superbugs. (2018-01-25)

Targeted 'click-to-release' chemotherapy gives good results in mice
Tagworks Pharmaceuticals, based at Radboud university medical center, has developed a new technique for the targeted delivery of chemotherapy for tumors in cases where this was previously very difficult. By way of the controlled 'click-to-release' of the chemotherapy drug from its tumor-binding carrier, the chemotherapy can be activated at the right location. The company is publishing the results of studies in mice that have been treated with this method in Nature Communications. (2018-05-04)

Solution to long-standing chemistry riddle has implications for drug development
Scientists have solved a decades-old challenge by working out how to craft functional residues onto a molecular cube. Cubane now has a plethora of additional applications in the fields of drug development, materials science and molecular engineering. (2018-02-01)

Realistic rodent model of drug addiction
Drug addiction may not require a habitual relationship with a substance, suggests findings from a new model of cocaine administration in rats that better captures the human experience of obtaining and using drugs. The research, published in JNeurosci, represents a step towards a translational animal model of addiction that challenges widely held views about drug users. (2017-11-20)

Non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient could help addicts stay clean
A preclinical study in rats has shown that there might be value in using a non-psychoactive and non-addictive ingredient of the Cannabis sativa plant to reduce the risk of relapse among recovering drug and alcohol addicts. The study's findings inform the ongoing debate about the possible medical benefits of non-psychoactive cannabinoids. So says Friedbert Weiss, leader of an investigative team at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, in Neuropsychopharmacology published by Springer Nature. (2018-03-23)

Brain metastases common and difficult to treat in ROS1 lung cancer
Brain metastases were found to be fairly common in stage IV ROS1-positive cancers and in 47 percent of ROS1 patients, the brain was the first and only site of progression. (2018-07-10)

Cicardian system suffers and protects from prenatal cocaine exposure
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have shown that prenatal cocaine exposure in zebrafish (which share the majority of the same genes with humans) can alter neuronal development and acutely dysregulate the expression of circadian genes and those affecting melatonin signaling, growth and neurotransmission. The circadian factors, including the principal circadian hormone melatonin, can attenuate the prenatal effects of cocaine. These findings appear in the July 11 issue of the journal PLoS ONE. (2007-07-10)

Study examines FDA's expedited programs & development time of new drugs to treat serious diseases
Drugs reviewed by the FDA in programs intended to speed drug developmentĀ  were approved nearly a year quicker than drugs reviewed by the FDA through normal processes. (2017-12-05)

50 years ago, Clomid gave birth to the era of assisted reproduction
In the journal Fertility and Sterility, Dr. Eli Adashi writes a history and appreciation of the wonder drug Clomid, which radically changed what doctors could do for couples struggling to have children. (2017-09-13)

Deep learning predicts drug-drug and drug-food interactions
A Korean research team from KAIST developed a computational framework, DeepDDI, that accurately predicts and generates 86 types of drug-drug and drug-food interactions as outputs of human-readable sentences, which allows in-depth understanding of the drug-drug and drug-food interactions. (2018-04-18)

Given the choice, zebrafish willingly dose themselves with opioids
Researchers at University of Utah Health devised a system that allowed zebrafish to self-administer doses of hydrocodone, an opioid commonly prescribed to people for pain, to study drug dependency behavior. (2017-08-25)

ALS drug may help treat prostate cancer
Researchers have discovered a new use for an old drug as a potential treatment for prostate cancer. The findings are published in the journal The Prostate. (2018-10-03)

Researchers identify new compounds to treat RSV, Zika virus
A new and promising class of chemical compounds has major potential for treating Zika virus and respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. The next step is to develop a drug. (2018-07-11)

Nemours, UD technology pushes cancer research forward
Nemours Biomedical Research and the University of Delaware (UD) Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a patent-pending process to make 3-D models work in high throughput screening labs, allowing drug discovery to move into more meaningful screening systems. Sigrid Langhans, PhD, of Nemours, along with Darrin Pochan, PhD, of UD and colleagues, published an article about their findings this week in Analytical Biochemistry. (2017-08-10)

Diabetes drug metformin inhibits multidrug-resistant breast cancer
The drug metformin, typically prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes, keeps breast cancer cells from developing multiple drug resistance (MDR) and can reverse MDR after itĀ¹s appeared, according to a study published Dec. 6, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Terra Arnason from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, and colleagues. (2017-12-06)

Young people are choosing marijuana before cigarettes and alcohol
More young people are turning to marijuana as their first substance of choice, rather than smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol, says Brian Fairman of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in the US, in Springer's journal Prevention Science. He says that young people who start off on marijuana before alcohol or tobacco are more likely to become heavy users and have cannabis-related problems later in life. (2018-05-17)

NUS study: RNA defects linked to multiple myeloma progression in high risk patients
Researchers from the Cancer Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore have uncovered an association between RNA abnormalities and MM progression. (2018-10-31)

This drug could block harmful impact of teen binge drinking
Alcohol-fueled parties might be seen as a rite of passage for many high school students, but they have an unexpected impact: binge-drinking behavior as teenagers can lead to problems with alcohol and other drug dependence later on in life. (2017-11-02)

Antiepileptic drug induces birth defects in frogs
A common drug for treating epileptic seizures may lead to birth defects if used during pregnancy by interfering with glutamate signaling in earliest stages of nervous system development, finds a study in frogs published in JNeurosci. The research could inform the development of new epilepsy medications that are safer for pregnant women. (2018-04-30)

Financial relationships and prescribing practices between physicians and drug companies
In a study published in The Oncologist, physicians treating certain cancers who consistently received payments from a cancer drug's manufacturer were more likely to prescribe that drug over alternative treatments. (2019-02-06)

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