Popular Drug Treatment News and Current Events

Popular Drug Treatment News and Current Events, Drug Treatment News Articles.
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Beta blockers can repair malformed blood vessels in the brain
Propranolol, a drug that is efficacious against infantile haemangiomas (''strawberry naevi'', resembling birthmarks), can also be used to treat cerebral cavernous malformations, a condition characterised by misshapen blood vessels in the brain and elsewhere. This has been shown by researchers at Uppsala University in a new study published in the scientific journal Stroke. (2021-02-23)

NUS researchers use AI to successfully treat metastatic cancer patient
A translational research team led by the National University of Singapore (NUS) has harnessed CURATE.AI, a powerful artificial intelligence (AI) platform, to successfully treat a patient with advanced cancer, completely halting disease progression. This new development represents a big step forward in personalised medicine. (2018-08-30)

Mayo discovery means individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapies
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway -- thought to be defective in cancer -- is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. This discovery enabled researchers to develop an algorithm to predict treatment effectiveness in individual patients. The findings appear in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2018-05-16)

NUS scientists combine antimalarial drug with light sensitive molecules for promising treatment of cancer
NUS scientists discovered that a combination of artemisinin, which is a potent anti-malarial drug, and aminolaevulinic acid, which is a photosensitizer, could kill colorectal cancer cells and suppress tumor growth more effectively than administering artemisinin alone. This novel combination therapy could also have fewer side effects. (2017-09-18)

The math of malaria
A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use. (2018-08-28)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

Tuberculosis drugs work better with vitamin C
Studies in mice and in tissue cultures suggest that giving vitamin C with tuberculosis drugs could reduce the unusually long time it takes these drugs to eradicate this pathogen. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-01-03)

OptiNose presents data on highly effective migraine treatment
OptiNose AS will present new Phase II data at the American Headache Society meeting in Boston on June 28. The Phase II clinical trial studied the safety and efficacy of sumatriptan, a migraine drug, when delivered to the nose by the OptiNose powder delivery device. The OptiNose and sumatriptan combination produced efficacy results comparable to previously published results on sumatriptan injections, the fastest (and also most painful) migraine treatment currently available. (2008-06-28)

Improving clinical trials with machine learning
Machine learning could improve our ability to determine whether a new drug works in the brain, potentially enabling researchers to detect drug effects that would be missed entirely by conventional statistical tests, finds a new UCL study published in Brain. (2017-11-15)

Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes. (2018-01-12)

Drug safety for penguins
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease. (2017-08-04)

Traditional Amazonian drug linked to improved sense of wellbeing
A psychedelic drug traditionally used in South America improves people's general sense of wellbeing and may offer a treatment for alcoholism and depression, new research suggests. (2017-11-09)

Hitgen and Cancer Research UK's Manchester Institute enter license agreement in lung cancer
Cancer Research UK, Cancer Research Technology (CRT), the charity's commercial arm, and HitGen Ltd, a privately held biotech company focused on early drug discovery, announced today that they have entered into a licence agreement to develop a novel class of drugs against lung cancer. (2017-02-27)

Researchers help develop new antifungal drug
University researchers, working with F2G Limited (Eccles, Manchester), have developed a new antifungal drug to help in the treatment of life threatening invasive fungal infections such as invasive aspergillosis. (2017-10-06)

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?
New research, led by Professor Anna deFazio from the Westmead Institute and Westmead Hospital, has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. (2018-02-15)

Finding a less poopy solution for fecal transplant regulation
As fecal matter transplants (FMTs) continue to be more widely adopted, it is critical to have an appropriate regulatory framework in place, authors of this Policy Forum emphasize. (2017-12-14)

'Chemsex' needs to become a public health priority
Chemsex -- sex under the influence of illegal drugs -- needs to become a public health priority, argue experts in The BMJ this week. (2015-11-03)

New hope for treating heart failure
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers. (2017-03-07)

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehicles
Creating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice. (2018-03-12)

Critical heart drug too pricey for some Medicare patients
An effective drug to treat chronic heart failure may cost too much for senior citizens with a standard Medicare Part D drug plan, said a study co-authored by a John A. Burns School of Medicine researcher at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The therapy is a combination of sacubitril/valsartan called Entresto®. Researchers found that, even with insurance, the cost to Medicare patients may be more than $1,600 a year. (2019-07-22)

One in 10 people have traces of cocaine or heroin on their fingerprints
Scientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 percent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints -- despite never using them. (2018-03-22)

Researchers develop breakthrough technique to combat cancer drug resistance
The ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs -- known as multi-drug resistance -- remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to 'turn off' their resistance capabilities. (2018-02-08)

A review on the therapeutic antibodies for spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-lasting damage in the spinal cord that leads to paraparesis, paraplegia, quadriplegia and other lifetime disabilities. The emergence of antibody treatment has paved a new pathway for the management of SCI. In this current review, Professor Weijiang Zhao and Doctor Danyang Tang summarize the experimentally therapeutic application of antibodies in SCI. (2016-10-03)

New research highlights ineffectiveness of 'wonder drug' for alcohol use disorders
A new study, published in the Addiction journal, conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool highlights the ineffectiveness of a specific drug treatment for alcohol use disorders. (2018-02-26)

How the malarial parasite is evading our arsenal of drugs
A team of researchers has identified numerous mutations that allow the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum to become resistant to treatment. Knowing the identity of genes that impart multidrug resistance is important for the design of new drugs, and for understanding how existing therapeutics can lose their efficacy in clinical settings. (2018-01-11)

New drug shows potential as a different kind of antidepressant in mouse trials
A potential new antidepressant and antianxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action has been developed by scientists at the University of Bath. (2017-11-06)

Major drug initiatives are best way to curb threat from parasites
Large-scale programmes to treat a life-threatening disease could improve the health of millions despite concerns about their long-term effects, a study suggests. (2017-01-25)

Entrectinib effective, well-tolerated against ROS1 and NTRK lung cancers, especially with brain metastases
Pooled analysis of three phase 1 and 2 clinical trials show that the drug entrectinib is effective and well-tolerated against advanced ROS1 and NTRK fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). (2019-12-13)

Should doctors tell patients about expensive, unfunded drugs?
It is unethical and paternalistic for doctors to withhold information from patients about new drugs that are not yet publicly funded, say researchers in this week's BMJ. New drugs may be more effective than existing treatments, but many are very expensive and may not be available through publicly funded health schemes. (2005-11-03)

Antibiotics can boost bacterial reproduction
The growth of bacteria can be stimulated by antibiotics, scientists at the University of Exeter have discovered. (2017-01-30)

Personalizing chemotherapy to treat pediatric leukemia
A team of UCLA bioengineers has demonstrated that its technology may go a long way toward overcoming the challenges of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, among the most common types of cancer in children, and has the potential to help doctors personalize drug doses. (2016-12-12)

Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect. (2019-04-11)

Why the bar needs to be raised for human clinical trials
Standards for authorizing first-time trials of drugs in humans are lax, and should be strengthened in several ways, McGill University researchers argue in a paper published today in Nature. (2017-01-30)

Single-cell mRNA cytometry via sequence-specific nanoparticle clustering and trapping
University of Toronto researchers developed a liquid biopsy technology to improve prostate cancer treatment. (2018-04-02)

Blood test could quickly predict if the drug palbociclib will help breast cancer patients
A new study has found a blood test for cancer DNA could predict if a woman is responding to the breast cancer drug palbociclib, months earlier than current tests. Scientists from The Institute of Cancer Research, London, say the test could detect in two to three weeks whether the drug is working, although they caution the results need replicating before they are used clinically. The research was funded by the Medical Research Council. (2018-03-01)

Drug combo gangs up to take on triple-negative breast cancer
In the hunt for novel treatments against an aggressive form of breast cancer, researchers combined a new protein inhibitor with a chemotherapy drug to create a powerful combination that resulted in cancer cell death. (2017-09-26)

New technology: Edible QR code can be the medicine of the future
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed a new method for the production of medicine. They print medical drugs in QR coded patterns onto an edible material. The production can be tailored to fit each patient and has the potential to protect against wrong medication and fake medicine according to the researchers. (2018-02-02)

Are women really under-represented in clinical trials?
Several studies have reported a lack of gender diversity in clinical trials, with trials including mostly adult males; however, a recent review of publicly available registration data of clinical trials at the US Food and Drug Administration for the most frequently prescribed drug classes found no evidence of any systemic significant under-representation of women. The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2018-01-11)

Preliminary study suggests drug may help babies with spinal muscular atrophy
A preliminary study suggests that an investigational drug may help increase protein levels in babies with spinal muscular atrophy. The open-label study is released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21-27, 2018. (2018-04-18)

Using artificial intelligence to find new uses for existing medications
Scientists have developed a machine-learning method that crunches massive amounts of data to help determine which existing medications could improve outcomes in diseases for which they are not prescribed. (2021-01-04)

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