Popular Echolocation News and Current Events

Popular Echolocation News and Current Events, Echolocation News Articles.
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Impacts of windfarm construction on harbor porpoises
Scientists from Germany, Denmark and the UK have built a model tool to predict what happens to marine animals when exposed to noise from the construction and operation of wind farms at sea. (2018-05-07)

Smooth, manmade surfaces create a 'blind spot' for bats using echolocation
Bats are well known for their sophisticated use of echolocation to navigate through areas riddled with obstacles, but now a new study reveals that this useful ability is hindered in the face of smooth vertical surfaces -- those that are particularly likely to be manmade. (2017-09-07)

Missing link shows bats flew first, developed echolocation later
The discovery of a remarkably well-preserved fossil representing the most primitive bat species known to date demonstrates that the animals evolved the ability to fly before they could echolocate. (2008-02-13)

UEA research paints underwater pictures with sound
Silent marine robots that record sounds underwater are allowing researchers to listen to the oceans as never before. While pilot whales make whistles, buzzes and clicks, pods of hunting dolphins create high-pitched echolocation clicks and larger species such as sperm whales make louder, slower clicks. As well as eavesdropping on marine life, the recordings can be used to measure sea-surface wind speed and monitor storms. The research will be presented at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, Vienna. (2018-04-10)

Dissecting artificial intelligence to better understand the human brain
In the natural world, intelligence takes many forms. It could be a bat using echolocation to expertly navigate in the dark, or an octopus adapting its behavior to survive in the deep ocean. Likewise, in the computer science world, multiple forms of artificial intelligence are emerging. As will be presented at the CNS conference, cognitive neuroscientists are using those emerging networks to enhance understanding of one of the most elusive intelligence systems, the human brain. (2018-03-25)

Capturing of the rare Yanbaru whiskered bat
The critically endangered Yanbaru whiskered bat, Myotis yanbarensis, has been caught for the first time on Okinawa Island since its discovery 22 years ago. (2018-04-27)

Why wind turbines can mean death for bats
Power-generating wind turbines have long been recognized as a potentially life-threatening hazard for birds. But at most wind facilities, bats actually die in much greater numbers. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology, a Cell Press journal, on Aug. 26 think they know why. (2008-08-25)

Deaf moth evolves sound-production as a warning to outwit its predator
A genus of deaf moth has evolved to develop an extraordinary sound-producing structure in its wings to evade its primary predator the bat. The finding, made by researchers from the University of Bristol and Natural History Museum, is described in Scientific Reports today. (2019-02-05)

Scientists records brain activity of free-flying bats
Johns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as a roving animal focuses and refocuses its attention. (2018-04-10)

Migrating squid drove evolution of sonar in whales and dolphins, researchers argue
Sperm whales, dolphins and other (2007-09-05)

Tiny insects become 'visible' to bats when they swarm
Small insects that would normally be undetectable to bats using echolocation suddenly become detectable when they occur in large swarms. Arjan Boonman of Tel-Aviv University and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-12-12)

The pros and cons of large ears
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have compared how much energy bats use when flying, depending on whether they have large or small ears. (2017-11-13)

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales
A new study sheds light on how toothed whales adapted their sonar abilities to occupy different environments. The study shows that as animals grew bigger, they were able to put more energy into their echolocation sounds -- but surprisingly, the sound energy increased much more than expected. (2018-11-15)

When does noise become a meaningful message?
Background noise is usually regarded as a nuisance that masks important sounds. But noise can convey information about important environmental conditions and allow animals to make informed decisions. When bat researchers played rain sounds for two different species of bats, both species chose to delay emergence from their roosts. (2019-02-06)

Bats use private and social information as they hunt
As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information as they hunt. (2019-09-24)

Bat researchers no longer flying blind on echolocation
Researchers at the University of Western Ontario (Western) led an international and multidisciplinary study using micro-computed tomography systems to shed new light on the way bats echolocate. With echolocation, animals emit sounds and then listen to the reflected echoes of those sounds to form images of their surroundings in their brains. The study is published in the journal Nature. (2010-01-24)

The genetic basis of bats' superpowers revealed
First six reference-quality bat genomes released and analysed (2020-07-23)

Muscles can't get any faster then this ... a fundamental muscle speed limit
When birds sing their elaborate songs, bats echolocate, rattlesnakes rattle and toadfish hum they use so-called superfast muscles, the fastest vertebrate muscles known. New research shows that these muscles have reached a maximum speed attainable in any vertebrate muscle. (2017-11-27)

Research shows pretend porpoise sounds are helping conservation efforts
An examination into the detection of harbour porpoises is helping to give new understanding of effective monitoring of species under threat from anthropogenic activities such as fisheries bycatch and coastal pollution. (2018-10-25)

How bat brain tracks prey
The bat midbrain is uniquely organized to facilitate rapid integration of sensory and motor information required for tracking prey using biological sonar, according to neural recordings of wild bats obtained during laboratory experiments described in JNeurosci. (2017-11-27)

What bats reveal about how humans focus attention
Researchers discover how a bat's brain determines what sounds are worth paying attention to. (And how human brains probably do too.) (2016-02-23)

Artificial materials reconstruct the porpoise's echolocation
Here, a study proposed a physical directional emission model to bridge the gap between porpoises' biosonar and artificial metamaterial. Inspired by the anatomical and physical properties of the porpoise's biosonar transmission system, researchers fabricated a hybrid metamaterial system composed of multiple composite structures. The metamaterial-based physical model may be helpful to achieve the physical mechanisms of porpoise biosonar detection and has diverse applications in underwater acoustic sensing, ultrasound scanning, and medical ultrasonography. (2019-09-19)

Bats go quiet during fall mating season
Giving someone the 'silent treatment' during courtship might not be the best strategy for romance. But, new research shows hoary bats fly with little or no echolocation at all as a possible mating-related behavior. (2018-05-02)

What's fair game on the high seas?
Discriminating among sustainably targetable tuna species and protected species that co-mingle near fish-aggregating devices (FADs) in mid-ocean is one of the leading challenges that face tropical tuna fisheries. Recent research has explored a practical approach to adapting commonly used nautical echo-location devices to predict, remotely, the abundance and numerical proportions of various tuna species in these mixed, FAD-centered populations. (2019-06-06)

Bats may benefit from wildfire
Bats face many threats -- from habitat loss and climate change to emerging diseases, such as white-nose syndrome. But it appears that wildfire is not among those threats, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-12-05)

New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordings
Scientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct dolphin click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins. This approach, presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Kaitlin Frasier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, California, and colleagues, could potentially help distinguish between dolphin species in the wild. (2017-12-07)

Why do bats fly into walls?
Bats sometimes collide with large walls even though they detect these walls with their sonar system. Researchers from Tel Aviv University have concluded that these collisions do not result from a sensory limitation but rather from an error in acoustic perception. (2020-11-09)

Bats vs. dolphins -- the ultimate battle of sonar systems
To find ways to improve man-made active sensing, scientists worldwide study the sonar systems of bats and dolphins. During the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9, Laura Kloepper will compare bat and dolphin sonar systems, describing her work on how the two animals cope with acoustic interference. She'll use her findings to argue why bats have the superior system. (2018-11-06)

A new social role for echolocation in bats that hunt together
To find prey in the dark, bats use echolocation. Some species, like Molossus molossus, may also search within hearing distance of their echolocating group members, sharing information about where food patches are located. Social information encoded in their echolocation calls may facilitate this foraging strategy that allows them to find food faster. (2020-06-19)

These masked singers are bats
Bats wear face masks, too. Bat researchers got lucky, observing wrinkle-faced bats in a lek, and copulating, for the first time. (2020-11-11)

What does the sperm whale say?
When a team of researchers began listening in on seven sperm whales in the waters off the Azores, they discovered that the whales' characteristic tapping sounds serve as a form of individual communication. But what are they actually saying? (2016-06-30)

Exploring the potential of human echolocation
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment using echolocation. Bo Schenkman, from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, will present a summary of some aspects of his work on human echolocation during Acoustics '17 Boston. (2017-06-25)

Fruit bats can transform echoes into images
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that fruit bats actually integrate vision and echolocation to flourish in the dead of night. (2019-06-26)

How bats recognize their own 'bat signals'
A new Tel Aviv University study identifies the mechanism that allows individual bats to avoid noise overlap by increasing the volume, duration and repetition rate of their signals. Unlocking the mystery of bat echo recognition may offer a valuable insight into military and civilian radar systems, which are vulnerable to electronic interference. (2016-01-28)

Mouth clicks used in human echolocation captured in unprecedented detail
Like some bats and marine mammals, people can develop expert echolocation skills, in which they produce a clicking sound with their mouths and listen to the reflected sound waves to 'see' their surroundings. A new study published in PLOS Computational Biology provides the first in-depth analysis of the mouth clicks used in human echolocation. (2017-08-31)

Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate
Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion -- a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University. (2019-10-03)

Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasounds
Millions of years of evolutionary fine-tuning have made dolphins phenomenally good at using echolocation to orient themselves, find food and communicate with one another. But how do they actually do it? New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that they emit two intertwined ultrasound beam components at different frequencies -- and with slightly different timing. (2018-05-31)

Revealing hidden information in sound waves
By essentially turning down the pitch of sound waves, University of Michigan engineering researchers have devised a way to unlock greater amounts of data from acoustic fields than ever before. (2018-11-29)

Fruit bat's echolocation may work like sophisticated surveillance sonar
High-speed recordings of Egyptian fruit bats in flight show that instead of using a primitive form of echolocation, these animals actually use a technique recently developed by humans for surveillance and navigation. (2018-02-07)

Batmobile with cruise control
A new study led by scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated the energy requirements and travel speeds of migrating Nathusius' bats (Pipistrellus nathusii). (2019-02-27)

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