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Popular Ecology News and Current Events, Ecology News Articles.
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Ethnic diversity in schools may be good for students' grades, a UC Davis study suggests
The findings suggest that schools might look for ways to provide cross-ethnic interaction among students to take advantage of ethnic diversity. (2017-09-11)
Study: Forest resilience declines in face of wildfires, climate change
The research team said that with a warming climate, forests are losing their resilience to wildfires. (2017-12-14)
Warmer water signals change for Scotland's shags
An increasingly catholic diet among European shags at one of Scotland's best-studied breeding colonies has been linked to long-term climate change and may have important implications for Scotland's seabirds. (2017-11-17)
Predicting insect feeding preferences after deforestation
Understanding how parasitoids and hosts interact, and how their interactions change with human influence, is critically important to understanding ecosystems. (2017-10-06)
Early bloomers: Statistical tool reveals climate change impacts on plants
Scientists from Utah State University, Harvard University, the University of Maryland, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Boston University and McGill University announce statistical tool to extract information from current and historical plant data. (2017-11-06)
Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South Africa
This is the first time that both Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii have been found in such large numbers on trees in South Africa. (2017-12-06)
Crime-scene technique used to track turtles
Scientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean. (2017-11-06)
Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. (2017-08-18)
Study finds variation within species plays critical role in health of ecosystems
Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important and unexpected consequences on the environment. (2017-12-11)
A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)
Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. (2017-10-02)
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlife
Protecting 'high carbon' rainforest areas also protects threatened wildlife. (2017-11-06)
New studies aim to boost social science methods in conservation research
Scientists have produced a series of papers designed to improve research on conservation and the environment. (2018-01-11)
Invasive plants have unprecedented ability to pioneer new continents and climates
'This could be a game-changer for invasive species risk assessment and conservation,' one researcher says. (2017-12-04)
Maize pest exploits plant defense compounds to protect itself
The western corn rootworm continues to be on the rise in Europe. (2017-11-27)
Additive manufacturing and sustainability: The environmental implications of 3-D printing
In a new special issue, Yale's Journal of Industrial Ecology presents the cutting-edge research on this emerging field, providing important insights into its environmental, energy, and health impacts. (2017-11-14)
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)
When not to eat your kids
Even though it is known to be a cannibal, the mangrove rivulus or killifish of the Americas will never eat one of its own embryos, even if it is hungry. (2017-09-05)
Global warming threatens Australia's iconic kangaroos
A new study published in the December issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology finds that an increase in average temperature of only two degrees Celsius could have a devastating effect on populations of Australia's iconic kangaroos. (2008-10-15)
Men with HPV are 20 times more likely to be reinfected after one year
An analysis of HPV in men shows that infection with one type strongly increased the risk of reinfection of the same type. (2017-12-05)
Polar bear blogs reveal dangerous gap between climate-change facts and opinions
Climate-change discussions on social media are very influential. A new study in BioScience shows that when it comes to iconic topics such as polar bears and retreating sea ice, climate blogs fall into two distinct camps. (2017-11-29)
Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)
Study finds variation within species is a critical aspect of biodiversity
Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also have important ecological consequences. (2017-12-05)
Opening a can of worms: Serendipitous discovery reveals earthworms more diverse than first thought
Scientists have found that the UK's common or garden earthworms are far more diverse than previously thought, a discovery with important consequences for agriculture. (2008-10-09)
Desert tortoises can't take the heat of roadside fencing
Desert tortoises pace back and forth and can overheat by roadside fencing meant to help them, according to a study by the University of California, Davis, and the University of Georgia. (2017-08-04)
Xylitol reduces risk of cavities
The sugar substitute xylitol affects the bacterial composition of the oral cavity even in low doses. (2007-02-15)
Jackdaws flap their wings to save energy
For the first time, researchers have observed that birds that fly actively and flap their wings save energy. (2017-08-11)
Birds are on the move in the face of climate change
Research on birds in northern Europe reveals that there is an ongoing considerable species turnover due to climate change and due to land use and other direct human influences. (2017-09-07)
Protecting the wild: Baylor professor helps to minimize recreation disturbance to wildlife
In a cover story published this week in the Ecological Society of America's premier journal, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Kevin J. (2017-11-03)
What makes soil, soil? Researchers find hidden clues in DNA
Ever wondered what makes a soil, soil? And could soil from the Amazon rainforest really be the same as soil from your garden? (2017-11-20)
Future climate change revealed by current climate variations
Uncertainty surrounding the extent of future climate change could be dramatically reduced by studying year-on-year global temperature fluctuations, new research has shown. (2018-01-17)
LSU, Yale team study agricultural impact on Mississippi River
According to a study published in Nature by researchers at LSU and Yale University, farming has significantly changed the hydrology and chemistry of the Mississippi River, injecting more carbon dioxide into the river and raising river discharge during the past 50 years. (2008-01-23)
Surprising killer of southeastern salt marshes: Common sea snails
From South Carolina to Texas, salt marshes have experienced a massive die-off in recent years, threatening fisheries and leaving coastal areas vulnerable to flooding. (2005-12-15)
African deforestation not as great as feared
The loss of forests in Africa in the past century is substantially less than previously estimated, an analysis of historical records and paleontology evidence by Yale researchers shows. (2017-12-11)
Ozone watch
The symposium covers all issues related to atmospheric ozone, including trends of ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere, ozone-climate interactions, latest emerging techniques for ozone observations, and effects of ozone on human health, ecosystems and food production. (2017-02-01)
What fluffy bunnies can tell us about domestication: It didn't go the way you think
It turns out that nobody knows when rabbits were domesticated. (2018-02-14)
Orange is the new green: How orange peels revived a Costa Rican forest
In the mid-1990s, 1,000 truckloads of orange peels and orange pulp were purposefully unloaded onto a barren pasture in a Costa Rican national park. (2017-08-22)
A global early warning system for infectious diseases
In the recent issue of EMBO reports, Barbara Han of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and John Drake of the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology call for the creation of a global early warning system for infectious diseases. (2016-05-19)
Recovery from acid rain 'much slower than expected'
Studies in Scotland and Wales show that streams still have high levels of acidity from pollution in the 1970s and 1980s, despite efforts to clean them. (2007-09-28)
Snacking snakes act as 'ecosystem engineers' in seed dispersal
Despite the bad rap snakes often get, they are more central to ecology than most people realize. (2018-02-08)
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