Popular Economic Benefits News and Current Events

Popular Economic Benefits News and Current Events, Economic Benefits News Articles.
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Satellite images reveal global poverty
How far have we come in achieving the UN's sustainable development goals that we are committed to nationally and internationally? Yes, it can be difficult to make a global assessment of poverty and poor economic conditions, but with an eye in the sky, researchers are able to give us a very good hint of the living conditions of populations in the world's poor countries. (2019-01-07)

For some US counties, climate change will be particularly costly
A highly granular assessment of the impacts of climate change on the US economy suggests that each 1┬░Celsius increase in temperature will cost 1.2 percent of the country's gross domestic product, on average. (2017-06-29)

Quantifying nature's mental health benefits
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-03-08)

Nature-based solutions can prevent $50 billion in Gulf Coast flood damages
While coastal development and climate change are increasing the risk of flooding for communities along the US Gulf Coast, restoration of marshes and oyster reefs are among the most cost-effective solutions for reducing those risks, according to a new study. (2018-04-11)

Economic rewards of better land management: Estimated 2.3 billion tons of crops worth $1.4 trillion
Adopting proven sustainable land management practices could raise world crop supplies by an estimated 2.3 billion tonnes, worth $1.4 trillion, experts say in a study being released at a major global desertification conference. Conducted by the international Economics of Land Degradation initiative, the scientific interim report says land's economic value (2013-09-24)

Mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs
The purpose of this article was to propose mental health and mental disorder recommendation programs, and to recommend policies for policy makers and research investors. (2017-12-11)

Investing in public education earns high marks for greater upward mobility
Investing in education may help boost economic opportunities for the next generation, according to a team of economists. (2018-03-28)

Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
In the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. The cold winters and other factors can lead to losses for farmers and forage shortages. Researchers have identified annual forage crops that can be cultivated in fields with winter-killed or terminated alfalfa. (2018-01-03)

Study: Reducing greenhouse gas in rocky mountain region has health, financial benefits
Research by Drexel University and the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests that imposing fees on energy producers that emit greenhouse gas could improve the health and financial well-being of the Rocky Mountain region. (2019-07-25)

Small materials poised for big impact in construction
Bricks, blocks, and steel I-beams -- step aside. A new genre of construction materials, made from stuff barely 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, is about to debut in the building of homes, offices, bridges, and other structures. And a new report is highlighting both the potential benefits of these nanomaterials in improving construction materials and the need for guidelines to regulate their use and disposal. The report appears in the monthly journal ACS Nano. (2010-07-28)

The Great Recession took a toll on public health, study finds
The Great Recession, spanning 2008 to 2010, was associated with heightened cardiovascular risk factors, including increased blood pressure and glucose levels, according to a new UCLA-led study. The connections were especially pronounced among older homeowners and people still in the work force, two groups that may have been especially vulnerable to the stresses the Recession brought about. (2018-03-12)

Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some moms
Women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The same benefits were not observed in women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy. (2018-02-28)

Star architecture and its impact on the city
The Guggenheim Museum by star architect Frank Gehry led to an economic boom in the Spanish city of Bilbao. This 'Bilbao Effect' is appealing to many urban planners and politicians who look to better position their cities in economic and social terms by building exceptional architectural projects. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have studied three projects to investigate whether or not the desired effects materialize. (2018-02-12)

Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health
Health risks increase for infants born to mothers living within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site, according to a study published Dec. 13 in Science Advances. (2017-12-13)

Climate change increases potential for conflict and violence
Images of extensive flooding or fire-ravaged communities help us see how climate change is accelerating the severity of natural disasters. Iowa State researchers say what is not as clear is the indirect effect of these disasters and rapid climate change on violence and aggression. They have identified three ways climate change will increase the likelihood of violence. (2019-02-13)

5G set to revolutionize communications and to transform industry
The new generation of 5G mobile networks is the future of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) sector -- a true technological revolution that will deliver the Internet of Things and is being driven by R&D+i initiatives like '5TONIC,' Spain's leading 5G innovation laboratory. (2017-12-07)

Crunch time for food security
Insects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. The challenge now is to broaden their appeal, safely and sustainably (2017-11-10)

Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. The focus of this technology is on the large-scale reduction of carbon emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants. Research published in the International Journal of Decision Support Systems investigates the pros and cons, assesses the risks associated with carbon capture and provides a new framework for assessing the necessary technology. (2016-02-17)

Could cleaning up beaches make Americans better off?
Cleaning up beaches could boost local economies in addition to preserving natural treasures and animal habitats, Ohio State study finds. (2018-02-26)

New technology detects COPD in minutes
Pioneering research by Professor Paul Lewis of Swansea University's Medical School into one of the most common lung diseases in the UK, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, has led to the development of a new technology that can quickly and easily diagnose and monitor the condition. (2016-11-17)

Genetic effects are influenced by lifestyle
The risk for developing obesity is influenced by our lifestyle as well as our genes. In a new study from Uppsala University, researchers show that our genetic risk for obesity is not static, but is influenced by our lifestyle. Results from the study have been published in the scientific journal PLOS Genetics. (2017-09-06)

Booze and pot use in teens lessens life success
Young adults dependent on marijuana and alcohol are less likely to achieve adult life goals, according to new research by UConn Health scientists presented November 5 at the American Public Health Association 2017 Annual Meeting & Expo. (2017-11-05)

California's water saving brings bonus effects
Water-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state. That is the conclusion of new research from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters. (2018-01-11)

Interest rate hikes 'pose mental health threat to people in debt'
Interest rate hikes by central banks can impact on the mental health of people in debt, a new study led by University of Stirling experts has found. (2018-03-19)

Trade-offs between economic growth and deforestation
In many developing countries, economic growth and deforestation seem to go hand in hand -- but the links are not well understood. In a new study, researchers use an innovative methodology to quantify the relationship. (2017-01-16)

Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience model
If a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood. But since every disaster and every community is unique, a uniform measure for defining 'resilience' has been hard to come by for engineers and social scientists. A new study offers an innovative approach to defining resilience that could help communities better prepare for hazards. (2018-01-05)

Economic concerns drive sustainability in American cities and towns
While environmental issues are often cited as a major factor in cities and towns in pursuing sustainability, a new study shows that economic concerns can be just as important to local governments in adopting concrete sustainability plans. (2016-04-25)

Environmental policy, pollution and economic growth
A new study suggests that air pollution policy reduces the extent to which population growth in metropolitan areas results in increased pollution emissions without disrupting the economic growth from this urbanization. (2017-08-09)

Will people eat relish made from 'waste' ingredients? Drexel study finds they may even prefer it
A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from discarded ingredients. But the big question has been this: Will consumers accept products made from ingredients that were destined for the garbage? Would a person actually eat -- and pay for -- a granola bar made from spent brewing grains or a relish made from vegetables unfit for the supermarket? (2017-12-12)

PSU study: Pro-diversity policies make companies more innovative and profitable
PSU business school professor's research shows that companies that hire a more diverse set of employees are rewarded with a richer pipeline of innovative products and a stronger financial position. (2018-02-23)

Light, physical activity reduces brain aging
Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity, is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain aging. (2019-04-19)

Better be safe than sorry: Economic optimization risks tipping of Earth system elements
# While the concept of profit maximization can be successful in bringing down costs of greenhouse gas reductions... # ... it does not suffice to avoid the tipping of critical elements in the Earth system. # Scientists used mathematical experiments to analyse three grand concepts of environmental policy. (2018-06-15)

Obama and Trump administrations get opposite environmental assessment results
Using vast discrepancies between environmental assessments by the Obama and Trump administrations related to the Clean Water Act (CWA) as a key example, authors of this Policy Forum highlight the need for a systematic protocol for government cost-benefits analyses of proposed regulations. (2017-10-05)

UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover crops
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. They found that while cover crops can cut into profitability over the short term, there are a number of benefits over long-term adoption. (2018-02-05)

Dartmouth economist outlines reforms to improve access to affordable, high quality child care
For families in the US, the costs of high-quality child care are exorbitant, especially for those with children under age five. A new policy proposal, 'Public Investments in Child Care,' by Dartmouth Associate Professor of Economics Elizabeth Cascio, finds that current federal child care tax policies are not benefiting the families most burdened by child care costs. Therefore, Cascio outlines a new policy that could replace the current federal child care tax policies. (2017-10-22)

How maximizing fish stocks in the long-term will reduce bycatch
Efforts to sustainably manage fisheries will also reduce bycatch, a new study suggests. (2018-03-15)

New study finds $1 million-per-mile economic impact of TVA reservoirs
UTIA researchers conducted in-depth surveys of visitors and property owners along three of TVA's 49 reservoirs -- Norris, Watts Bar and Chickamauga -- during Summer 2016. The study determined that the combination of aquatic recreation and waterfront property along the Tennessee Valley Authority's managed river system creates $11.9 billion of annual economic impact to the region -- the equivalent of $1 million per shoreline mile. (2017-05-24)

Pushy or laid back? Economic factors influence parenting style
A new study co-authored by Yale economist Fabrizio Zilibotti argues that parenting styles are shaped by economic factors that incentivize one strategy over others. (2017-10-05)

Biodiversity draws the ecotourism crowd
Nature -- if you support it, ecotourists will come. Managed wisely, both can win. The balancing act of protecting and fostering biodiversity with hordes of tourists in pristine nature parks is a global challenge. There are pathways to having it all -- protected areas with a rich variety of animals and plants and thriving tourism. In fact, the better the biodiversity, the more tourists will visit. What it takes to balance it is careful, holistic conservation strategy. (2018-11-08)

The perils of publishing location data for endangered species
While the increasing accessibility of data from scientific studies creates many benefits -- and represents a process that should be broadly embraced -- in the context of conserving endangered species it can actually be problematic, write David Lindenmayer and Ben Scheele in this Essay. (2017-05-25)

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