Popular Ecstasy News and Current Events

Popular Ecstasy News and Current Events, Ecstasy News Articles.
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Young adults report differing sexual effects from alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy
Alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy each have very different sexual effects, from attraction and desire to sensitivity to sexual dysfunction, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (2018-01-10)

Hip-hop music influencing more African-Americans to try 'Molly'
'Molly' is growing in popularity within the African-American community. New research shows much of that has to do with rap lyrics. (2018-02-12)

MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. (2019-02-08)

People are more likely to try drugs for the first time during the summer
American teenagers and adults are more likely to try illegal or recreational drugs for the first time in the summer, a new study shows. (2019-07-23)

Cocaine and ecstasy detected in waters of the L'Albufera in Valencia
The water in the canals and irrigation channels in the L'Albufera Natural Park in Valencia contain cocaine, ecstasy and a further six drugs. This has been confirmed by a study carried out by researchers from the University of Valencia, who have issued a warning about the continued presence of these substances on wildlife and human health. (2010-09-22)

Young people are intentionally taking drink and drugs for better sex
Teenagers and young adults across Europe drink and take drugs as part of deliberate sexual strategies. Findings published today in BioMed Central's open access journal, BMC Public Health, reveal that a third of 16-35 year old males and a quarter of females surveyed are drinking alcohol to increase their chances of sex, while cocaine, ecstasy and cannabis are intentionally used to enhance sexual arousal or prolong sex. (2008-05-08)

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs
Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health. (2018-07-12)

Leading toxicologist warns against new drug of abuse
An internationally recognized toxicologist at the University of Newcastle has warned of the dangers of abusing the drug benzylpiperazine. (2007-04-27)

Tiny probe can see and take body temperatures
University of Adelaide researchers have invented a world-first tiny fiber-optic probe that can simultaneously measure temperature and see deep inside the body. The probe may help researchers find better treatments to prevent drug-induced overheating of the brain, and potentially refine thermal treatment for cancers. (2018-04-12)

Mapping international drug use through the world's largest wastewater study
A seven-year project monitoring illicit drug use in 37 countries via wastewater samples shows that cocaine use was skyrocketing in Europe in 2017 and Australia had a serious problem with methamphetamine. (2019-10-23)

Unintentional drug use continues among molly users in EDM party scene
Use of MDMA or 'Molly' is common in the electronic dance music scene, but research is showing that many Molly users are using other drugs unknowingly. (2017-09-13)

How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy
Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip -- also known as catmint -- produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon. (2018-12-10)

Chapman University Publishes research on substance use among transgender students in California
Chapman University has published research on substance abuse among transgender students in California. The research looked at students in middle and high schools in nearly every school district in California. Results showed transgender adolescents were more than two times more likely to engage in substance use in their lifetimes. The paper appears in the Journal of School Health. (2017-08-15)

A study relates neural damage provoked by ecstasy with ambient temperature at which it is consumed
There exists a direct relationship between the consumption of MDMA, or ecstasy, at a high ambient temperature and an increase in the neural damage which this drug provokes. This was the conclusion of the research carried out by Beatriz Goñi at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Navarra. (2007-08-03)

Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patterns
The drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn't taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Now one team reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology a way to account for commutes and vacations: by tracking cell phone signals. (2017-09-20)

Ecstasy ingredient may promote cooperation
The recreational drug known as ecstasy or molly may help people regain trust in others after being betrayed, suggests results of a controlled laboratory study, published in JNeurosci, of healthy men given a pure form of the substance. The drug is currently being assessed for its potential as a supplemental treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. (2018-11-19)

Research links 'ecstasy' to survival of key movement-related cells in brain
New research from the University of Cincinnati suggests that the widely abused club drug (2006-10-18)

MDMA (a.k.a. ecstasy) makes octopuses more social too
When people take MDMA, the drug popularly known as ecstasy, a rush of serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin produces feelings of emotional closeness and euphoria, making people more interested than normal in connecting with other people. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 20 have made the surprising discovery that a species of octopus considered to be primarily solitary and asocial responds to MDMA similarly: by becoming much more interested in engaging with one other. (2018-09-20)

Does stimulation of the brain's dorsal anterior insula trigger ecstasy?
The epileptic 'aura' is a subjective phenomenon that sometimes precedes the visible clinical features of a seizure. Investigators tested three epileptic patients prior to potential surgery to try to determine where their seizures originate. They observed that these patients reported an ecstatic aura only when the dorsal anterior insula of the brain was stimulated. Their findings in the journal Brain Stimulation, published by Elsevier, provide additional support of a major role played by the dorsal anterior insula in ecstatic experiences. (2019-06-24)

Most ecstasy-related deaths occur among white males
Most people who die after taking ecstasy are white males in their late twenties, finds a study in this week's BMJ. (2003-01-09)

Psychedelic drugs could help treat PTSD
Clinical trials suggest treatment that involves psychedelics can be more effective than psychotherapy alone. More than three million people in the United States are diagnosed each year with post-traumatic stress disorder, whose symptoms include nightmares or unwanted memories of trauma, heightened reactions, anxieties, and depression--and can last months, or even years. (2020-01-17)

Drug overdose deaths in CT doubled in 6 years
Opioid overdose deaths in Connecticut doubled in the past 6 years, largely driven by use of multiple drugs together, according to a team of researchers from the University of Connecticut and Yale University. (2019-10-29)

NYU researchers document self-reported use of new synthetic drugs by teens/young adults
This is the first study reporting on use of a variety of new drugs in a nationally representative US sample. Researchers are confident that use was severely underreported, as the subjects were not asked about most of these new drugs specifically. The researchers advocate for health surveys to ask about use of new drugs, in addition to traditional drugs such as marijuana and cocaine, in order to quickly pick up on potential drug epidemics. (2015-09-15)

'Ecstasy' shows promise for post-traumatic stress treatment
An international study involving researchers from UBC Okanagan has shown that MDMA, also known as ecstasy, may be a valuable tool for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Published recently in Psychopharmacology, the study demonstrated substantial improvements in individuals who had not responded to prior treatments, explains UBCO Associate Professor of psychology Zach Walsh. This is also, he adds, the most comprehensive evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. (2019-05-29)

Strobe lighting at dance music festivals linked to tripling in epileptic fit risk
Strobe lighting at electronic dance music festivals may be linked to a tripling in the risk of epileptic fits in susceptible individuals, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-06-11)

MDMA makes people cooperative, but not gullible
New research from King's College London has found that MDMA, the main ingredient in ecstasy, causes people to cooperate better -- but only with trustworthy people. In the first study to look in detail at how MDMA impacts cooperative behavior the researchers also identified changes to activity in brain regions linked to social processing. (2018-11-19)

Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use
In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones -- commonly known as 'bath salts' -- have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country. (2020-06-15)

New study finds no cognitive impairment among ecstasy users
In contrast to many prior studies, ecstasy users in the new study showed no signs of cognitive impairment attributable to drug use: ecstasy use did not decrease mental ability. (2011-02-15)

How to accurately assess use of new psychoactive drugs such as 'bath salts'
Researchers surveyed individuals entering NYC EDM parties about their drug usage, with almost one out of ten participants who reported no 'bath salt' use as per the gate question then reported use of one or more drugs in this class, such as methylone, providing evidence of under-reporting. (2017-05-16)

NYU research: Hair sampling shows unintended 'bath salt' use
Dr. Palamar and his team of researchers are the first to examine whether ecstasy users are unknowingly or unintentionally using 'bath salts' and/or other novel psychoactive drugs. (2016-02-18)

New article from Brain: A Journal of Neurology
An article, 'Smaller amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex predict escalating stimulant use,' published online on May 13 in Brain: A Journal of Neurology has found that individual differences in brain structure could help to determine the risk for future drug addiction. The study found that occasional users who subsequently increased their drug use compared with those who did not, showed brain structural differences when they started using drugs. (2015-05-15)

Mapping international drug use by looking at wastewater
Wastewater-based epidemiology is a rapidly developing scientific discipline with the potential for monitoring close to real-time, population-level trends in illicit drug use. The results of the international monitoring campaigns performed annually over seven years (2011-2017) by an international group of scientists, the SCORE group (Sewage analysis CORe group Europe), are now compiled in an article published in the prestigious journal Addiction. (2019-10-23)

Illegal use of human growth hormone common among young male weightlifters
A new study published in the American Journal on Addictions reveals that illicit use of HGH (human growth hormone) has become common among young American male weightlifters. (2011-01-20)

Rolling on Molly: US H.S. seniors underreport ecstasy use when not asked about Molly
A new study, published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence by researchers affiliated with NYU CDUHR, compared self-reported ecstasy/MDMA use with and without 'Molly' in the definition. Researchers found that reported lifetime use (8.0 percent vs. 5.5 percent) was significantly higher with Molly in the definition. (2016-06-13)

Ecstasy affects memory, new international study shows
Regular users of the drug ecstasy are at risk of long-term memory problems, an international study has found. (2004-01-14)

Recreational amphetamine use may hasten biological aging of the heart
The use of recreational amphetamine, popularly known as 'speed,' 'ice,' and 'ecstasy,' may hasten the biological ageing of the heart, suggests research, published in the online journal Heart Asia. (2017-02-09)

Study reveals how ecstasy acts on the brain and hints at therapeutic uses
Brain imaging experiments have revealed for the first time how ecstasy produces feelings of euphoria in users. (2014-01-17)

Doctors should look for drug misuse in young patients with stroke
The growing pandemic of cocaine use in Western society is providing increasing evidence of its association with intracerebral haemorrhage. In this week's BMJ, Andrew McEvoy and colleagues warn doctors to be alert both for drug misuse and an underlying vascular cause in cases of young patients with haemorrhagic stroke. (2000-05-11)

Mind-altering drugs could treat mental disorders
Psychedelic compounds have had a colorful past. Although initially investigated for medical uses, they were banned after cultural and political times changed in the 1960s and 1970s. Now, the compounds are getting another chance in the mainstream, according to the cover story of Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2016-03-30)

Around 200 million people using illicit drugs worldwide each year, with use highest in high-income countries
The first paper in the Lancet Series on Addiction addresses the global burden of disease due to illicit drug use, and reports estimates that some 200 million people worldwide use illicit drugs each year. This figure represents one in 20 people aged 15-64 years, and use is highest in developed countries. (2012-01-05)

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