Popular Eczema News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Eczema News and Current Events, Eczema News Articles.
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The Center for the Study of Itch reviews what causes chronic itching and scratching
Relentless itch is a feature of many skin disorders, such as eczema and psoriasis, but the cause of this itch -- and what drives us to scratch -- is somewhat mysterious. A review appearing Nov. 21 in the journal Trends in Immunology from the Washington University School of Medicine Center for the Study of Itch presents what we know about the biology of the itch-scratch cycle. (2018-11-21)

What is shared decision-making and how does it work for allergists?
A new article published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, walks allergists and other health care practitioners through the steps involved in shared decision-making (SDM). It also details what is, and what is not, SDM. (2018-09-07)

Cancer patients may experience delayed skin effects of anti-PD-1 therapy
Cancer patients receiving anti-PD-1 therapies who develop lesions, eczema, psoriasis, or other forms of auto-immune diseases affecting the skin may experience those adverse reactions on a delay -- sometimes even after treatment has concluded. (2018-07-18)

Mutations in this molecule may have helped mammoths tolerate the cold
Columbia University biomedical researchers have captured close-up views of TRPV3, a skin-cell ion channel that plays important roles in sensing temperature, itch, and pain. (2018-08-24)

Using light to stop itch
Itch is easily one of the most annoying sensations. For chronic skin diseases like eczema, it's a major symptom. Although it gives temporary relief, scratching only makes things worse because it can cause skin damage, additional inflammation and even more itch. EMBL researchers have now found a way to stop itch with light in mice. Nature Biomedical Engineering publishes their results on Dec. 17, 2018. (2018-12-17)

Aggressive treatment of childhood eczema could help prevent asthma, says new study
More aggressive treatment of childhood eczema may be an important step in preventing asthma, says a new Australian study. (2008-07-06)

Researchers raise bar for successful management of severe atopic dermatitis
A team of investigators from the University of Colorado College of Nursing at CU Anschutz Medical Campus and National Jewish Health has identified comprehensive guidelines for managing severe atopic dermatitis (AD), the most common form of eczema. (2019-01-15)

LJI researchers discover key driver of atopic dermatitis
Severe eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is driven by an allergic reaction. In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute reveal an important player that promotes skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and the characteristic thickening of the skin. (2018-01-16)

Long-term dupilumab benefits adolescents with eczema
Results from a phase IIa open-label trial and a subsequent phase III open-label extension trial reinforce findings from an earlier short-term trial that adolescents with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, or eczema, can experience significant improvements with dupilumab. The results from these latest studies, which are reported in the British Journal of Dermatology, demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of the medication for up to 52 weeks of treatment. (2019-10-09)

Researchers discover new source of skin defects in eczema
Researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered a cause of the dry, inflamed and itchy skin that plagues eczema patients. A team led by Donald Leung, MD, PhD, has shown that an immune system skewed toward allergy alters the lipids in the skin. The altered lipids allow the skin to crack, water to leave and irritants to enter, setting the stage for eczematous lesions to develop. (2018-02-26)

Associations between acid-suppressing medications, antibiotics in infancy and later allergic disease
The use of acid-suppressing medications or antibiotics in the first six months of infancy was associated with an increased risk for the subsequent development of allergic diseases in childhood. (2018-04-02)

How scratching may prime children with eczema for food allergy and anaphylaxis
Eczema, a chronic itchy inflammatory skin disease, affects about 15 percent of U.S. children. It's a strong risk factor for food allergies -- more than half of children with eczema are allergic to one or more foods -- and most people with food allergy have eczema. But the connection between the two hasn't been clear. New research in a mouse model demonstrates, for the first time, that scratching the skin promotes allergic reactions to foods, including anaphylaxis. (2019-04-30)

New treatments help those with mild, moderate and severe eczema
Although many adults with eczema develop the disease in childhood and carry it through life, a large number are first diagnosed in adulthood -- a trend being discussed at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting. There are new treatments available to ease the symptoms. (2017-10-27)

Fish in early childhood reduces risk of disease
It doesn't take that much fish for young children to reap big health benefits. Even eating fish just once a week yields good results. (2019-10-08)

A common skin bacterium put children with severe eczema at higher risk of food allergy
In a new study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, scientists from King's College London have found that young children with severe eczema infected with Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacterium, are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy. (2019-05-31)

New potential approach to treat atopic dermatitis
How does the immune system respond to fungi on our skin? Researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that the same immune cells that protect us against skin fungi also encourage the inflammatory symptoms of atopic dermatitis. An antibody therapy could alleviate this chronic inflammatory skin disease. (2019-03-18)

Antibiotics not effective for clinically infected eczema in children
Estimates suggest that 40 percent of eczema flares are treated with topical antibiotics, but findings from a study led by Cardiff University suggest there is no meaningful benefit from the use of either oral or topical antibiotics for milder clinically infected eczema in children. (2017-03-14)

Use of tape strips in early onset pediatric atopic dermatitis
May also help predict therapeutic responses. (2019-10-09)

Breaking news on oral food challenges
Two medically challenging cases being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting contain new information on the benefits of oral food challenges when diagnosing food allergies. (2019-11-08)

How the skin becomes inflamed
Publishing online this week in Cell Host & Microbe, researchers at Johns Hopkins report the discovery of a key underlying immune mechanism that explains why to how our skin becomes inflamed from conditions such as atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema. Toxin-producing bacteria on the surface of our skin induces a protein that causes our own cells to react and cause inflammation. (2017-11-08)

How prenatal diet, delivery mode and infant feeding relate to pediatric allergies
Two new studies being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting contain new information on how prenatal diet, the way the baby is delivered, and infant feeding practices can affect the risk of allergy. (2019-11-08)

Environmental variables may influence B cell development and allergies in children
An analysis of a birth cohort containing 51 newborns followed from infancy through the first three years of life has linked mutations in antibodies to a heightened risk of allergic diseases such as eczema. (2019-02-27)

Vitamin D lessens symptoms of severe eczema in children
Vitamin D supplementation eased the symptoms experienced by children with severe atopic dermatitis, or eczema, in a recent randomized controlled trial published in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-04)

Protecting babies from eczema with low-cost Vaseline
A Northwestern Medicine study published today (Dec. 5) in JAMA Pediatrics found that seven common moisturizers would be cost effective in preventing eczema in high-risk newborns. By using the cheapest moisturizer in the study (petroleum jelly), the cost benefit for prophylactic moisturization was only $353 per quality-adjusted life year -- a generic measure of disease burden that assesses the monetary value of medical interventions in one's life. (2016-12-05)

Trial finds no benefit of bath emollients beyond standard eczema care for children
Emollient bath additives provide no meaningful benefit when used in addition to standard eczema care in children, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-05-02)

New study reveals how electronic health records can benefit clinical trials
A new study by Swansea University academics has indicated that the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank can provide a simple, cost-effective way to follow-up after the completion of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). (2018-05-16)

Eczema drug effective against severe asthma
Two new studies of patients with difficult-to-control asthma show that the eczema drug dupilumab alleviates asthma symptoms and improves patients' ability to breathe better than standard therapies. Dupilumab, an injectable anti-inflammatory drug, was approved in 2017 by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for eczema, a chronic skin disease. (2018-05-21)

Skin diseases are more common than we think
Skin diseases are ranked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, but many affected people do not consult a physician. A new Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology study estimates the prevalence of skin diseases outside the typical medical setting. (2019-03-20)

Antibiotics not effective for clinically infected eczema in children
There is no meaningful benefit from the use of either oral or topical antibiotics for milder clinically infected eczema in children. (2017-03-13)

Water baths as good as bleach baths for treating eczema
For patients suffering from eczema (atopic dermatitis), dermatologists will sometimes recommend bleach baths to decrease bacterial infection and reduce symptoms. But a new Northwestern Medicine study found no difference in the effectiveness of a bleach bath compared to regular water baths. In addition, bleach baths can cause stinging and burning of skin, and occasionally even trigger asthma flare-ups in patients. (2017-11-15)

Bacteria therapy for eczema shows promise in NIH study
Topical treatment with live Roseomonas mucosa--a bacterium naturally present on the skin--was safe for adults and children with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and was associated with reduced disease severity, according to initial findings from an ongoing early-phase clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health. Preclinical work in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis had suggested that R. mucosa strains collected from healthy skin can relieve disease symptoms. (2018-05-03)

Stem cell transplantation: undesirable rejection mechanism identified
In the treatment of leukaemia, stem cell transplantation subsequent to chemotherapy and radiation can often engender severe adverse inflammatory reactions - especially in the skin or in the gut, since these so-called barrier organs are more frequently affected. Up until now, the reason for this was unclear. A team of researchers in Vienna has now identified an immune mechanism that is partially responsible for this. (2020-11-19)

Are suicidal thoughts, attempts more likely in people with eczema?
Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects millions of adults and children and has been associated with depression and anxiety. Evidence on the association between eczema and suicidal thoughts or attempts has been inconclusive. This study evaluated the association between eczema and suicidal thoughts and attempts by analyzing the combined results of 15 studies including 310,000 patients with eczema and 4.4 million people without eczema. (2018-12-12)

New study shows eczema in African-Americans is more difficult to treat
A new study suggests that African-Americans may face a greater struggle to find effective therapies for atopic dermatitis than European-Americans. The study used molecular profiling to study the skin of both groups. (2018-09-14)

Silk clothing did not improve eczema in children
No significant differences were observed in eczema severity for children with moderate to severe eczema who wore silk garments compared with those who wore their usual clothing, according to a randomized controlled study published in PLOS Medicine by Kim Thomas from University of Nottingham, UK, and colleagues. (2017-04-11)

Biomedical researchers get closer to why eczema happens
A new study from researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York may help to peel back the layers of unhealthy skin -- at least metaphorically speaking -- and get closer to a cure. (2020-06-24)

Scientists identify genetic cause of previously undefined primary immune deficiency disease
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have identified a genetic mutation that accounts for a perplexing condition found in people with an inherited immunodeficiency. The disorder, called combined immunodeficiency, is characterized by a constellation of severe health problems, including persistent bacterial and viral skin infections, severe eczema, acute allergies and asthma and cancer. (2009-09-24)

Drinking milk while breastfeeding may reduce the child's food allergy risk
Children of mothers who drink relatively more cow's milk during breastfeeding are at reduced risk of developing food allergies. That is the conclusion of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in a new study published in the scientific journal Nutrients. (2020-12-21)

Atopic eczema: One size does not fit all
Researchers from the UK and Netherlands have identified five distinct subgroups of eczema, a finding that helps explain how the condition can affect people at different stages of their lives. (2017-11-21)

Fish oil and probiotic supplements in pregnancy may reduce risk of childhood allergies
Women who take fish oil supplements and probiotics in later pregnancy may reduce their child's risk of food allergy and eczema, according to new research. (2018-02-28)

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