Popular Electric Field News and Current Events

Popular Electric Field News and Current Events, Electric Field News Articles.
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Biosensor could help diagnose illnesses directly in serum
In this age of fast fashion and fast food, people want things immediately. The same holds true when they get sick and want to know what's wrong. But performing rapid, accurate diagnostics on a serum sample without complex and time-consuming manipulations is a tall order. Now, a team reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed a biosensor that overcomes these issues. (2017-08-30)

Doped photovoltaics
Organic solar cells are made of cheap and abundant materials, but their efficiency and stability still lag behind those of silicon-based solar cells. A Chinese-German team of scientists has found a way to enhance the electric conductivity of organic solar cells, which increases their performances. Doping the metal oxide interlayer, which connected the electrode and active layer, with a modified organic dye boosted both the efficiency and stability, the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie revealed. (2019-08-16)

What did Earth's ancient magnetic field look like?
New work from Carnegie's Peter Driscoll suggests Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. Then, shortly after our planet's core solidified, Driscoll's work predicts that Earth's magnetic field transitioned to a 'strong,' two-pole one. (2016-06-24)

Controlling quantum interactions in a single material
By demonstrating that multiple quantum interactions can coexist and be controlled in a single material, researchers open the door for ultrafast, low-power electronics and quantum computers. (2018-02-05)

Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests. (2017-12-28)

Light touch keeps a grip on delicate nanoparticles
Using a refined technique for trapping and manipulating nanoparticles, NIST researchers have extended the trapped particles' useful life more than tenfold. This new approach, which one researcher likens to (2012-05-03)

New technique reveals 3-D shape of nanostructure's polariton interaction
Researchers from Lehigh University have found a way to reveal the 3-D shape of the polariton interaction around a nanostructure. Their technique improves upon the common spectroscopic imaging technique known as scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). The research will be online published today in Nature Communications. (2018-05-21)

Hearing hybrid and electric vehicles while quieting noise pollution
Low-emission vehicles are considered too quiet for hearing-impaired pedestrians, so the European Union is mandating that they be equipped with acoustic vehicle alerting systems. With these alert systems would come a marked increase in the amount of noise on the roads across Europe. During the 174th ASA Meeting, Dec. 4-8, 2017, in New Orleans, researchers will present their work assessing the effectiveness of acoustic vehicle alerting systems and their downsides. (2017-12-05)

Multiresponsive nanosurfactant constructs tiny chemical factory
IBS scientists have made a surfactant based on nanoparticle dimers, which is responsive to multiple stimuli. The nanosurfactant combines several characteristics of each 'active' molecular surfactant which allows a tremendous flexibility whereby liquid droplets can be manipulated. (2018-01-10)

New lithium batteries from used cell phones
Research from the University of Cordoba (Spain) and San Luis University (Argentina) was able to reuse graphite from cell phones to manufacture environmentally friendly batteries. (2020-03-03)

The atomic dynamics of rare everlasting electric fields
Researchers have discovered the atomic mechanisms that give the unusual material yttrium manganite its rare magnetic and electric properties. All it took was ricocheting neutrons off the atoms of a sample of the material heated to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. (2018-01-10)

Scientists discover path to improving game-changing battery electrode
Researchers from Stanford University, two Department of Energy national labs and the battery manufacturer Samsung created a comprehensive picture of how the same chemical processes that give cathodes their high capacity are also linked to changes in atomic structure that sap performance. (2017-12-12)

Automated electric taxis could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and costs
Word on the street is that self-driving cars are the next big thing. But current vehicles emit a lot of greenhouse gases, and self-driving cars will initially come with a steep purchase price. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, that, with a mathematical model, they've shown that self-driving, electric taxis could reduce emissions, energy use and overall costs. (2018-03-28)

New lithium collection method could boost global supply
With continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a University of Texas at Austin professor and his research team may have a solution. (2018-02-09)

Soft magnetic material characterizations get a harder look
In motors, generators and similar electric machines, the electrical current that powers them generates magnetic fields that magnetize some of the metallic components. Choosing the right magnetic material is crucial for designing efficient machines, so researchers analyzed the existing system for characterizing soft magnetic materials. To identify a better system, they looked at several factors that can affect the uncertainty inherent in the measurement of magnetic properties. Their results are in this week's AIP Advances. (2017-11-14)

Clemson researchers blaze new ground in wireless energy generation
Researchers at the Clemson Nanomaterials Institute have developed a wireless energy source that generates electricity from simple mechanical motion, such as the waves in the ocean, the tap of a foot or the clap of a hand. (2018-02-05)

Tests with topical treatment strategy for fighting skin cancer yield positive results
The methodology developed in Brazil combines low-intensity electric current with a formulation containing nanoencapsulated chemotherapy. According to preliminary results of the study, cancer-induced mice treated with this new approach presented a significantly greater reduction in the size of the tumor than those that received it through injection. (2017-10-06)

Fuel from waste and electricity?
Researchers at Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research, the University of Tübingen, Cornell University, and Deutsche Biomasseforschungszentrum have shown that the combination of microbial and electrochemical conversion of biomass can yield valuable products. For the example of corn beer and corn silage they have gained energy-dense alkanes with diesel-fuel like properties at high carbon and energetic yield. Their work is published in Energy & Environmental Science, the highest ranked journal in environmental sciences. (2017-09-18)

Superconductivity can induce magnetism
Researchers from the Université de Montréal, the Paul Scherrer Institute, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory publish their results in the prestigious journal Science. (2008-09-11)

New sensor for measuring electric field strength
Standard Sensors for measuring electrical fields have one big problem: they usually distort the electric field they are supposed to measure. The problem gets worse if the sensor has to be grounded to provide a reference point. The new sensor developed in Vienna works in a different way. Two tiny silicon structures are displaced relative to each other, their movement is measured with light. (2018-01-24)

Hydrogen from sunlight -- but as a dark reaction
The storage of photogenerated electric energy and its release on demand are still among the main obstacles in artificial photosynthesis. One of the most promising, recently identified photocatalytic new materials is inexpensive graphitic carbon nitride. Scientists have now explored a modified form that can produce light-generated electrons and store them for catalytic hydrogen production even after the light has been switched off. They present this biomimetic photosynthesis approach in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2016-12-09)

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves
An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has demonstrated a new technique for accelerating electrons to very high energies over short distances. (2018-10-13)

Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution
Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. Generic mobile phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality tests than the brand counterparts, according to analysis and case studies in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2019-07-25)

Developing roads that can generate power from passing traffic
Researchers are looking at advanced materials for roads and pavements that could generate electricity from passing traffic. Engineers from Lancaster University are working on smart materials such as 'piezolectric' ceramics that when embedded in road surfaces would be able to harvest and convert vehicle vibration into electrical energy. (2017-09-18)

Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed
A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain. (2019-04-17)

Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films. (2018-01-05)

NASA mission uncovers a dance of electrons in space
NASA's MMS mission studies how electrons spiral and dive around the planet in a complex dance dictated by the magnetic and electric fields, and a new study revealed a bizarre new type of motion exhibited by these electrons. (2017-05-18)

Designing a new material for improved ultrasound
Development of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, China and Australia. (2018-03-22)

Researchers quantify factors for reducing power semiconductor resistance by two-thirds
Researchers in Japan announced that they have quantified for the first time the impacts of three electron-scattering mechanisms for determining the resistance of silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductor devices in power semiconductor modules. They found that resistance under the SiC interface can be reduced by two-thirds by suppressing electron scattering by the charges, a discovery that is expected to help reduce energy consumption in electric power equipment by lowering the resistance of SiC power semiconductors. (2017-12-04)

Uncertainty can cause more stress than inevitable pain
Knowing that there is a small chance of getting a painful electric shock can lead to significantly more stress than knowing that you will definitely be shocked. A new study found that situations in which subjects had a 50 percent chance of receiving a shock were the most stressful while 0 percent and 100 percent chances were the least stressful. People whose stress levels tracked uncertainty more closely were better at guessing whether or not they would receive a shock, suggesting that stress may inform judgments of risk. (2016-03-29)

Researchers offer new technology for liquid-crystal displays
An international research team from Russia, France, and Germany has proposed a new method for orienting liquid crystals. It could be used to increase the viewing angle of liquid-crystal displays. The researchers have found that by merely adding one methylene group to the side chain of the polymer, they could switch the LC orientation, which is crucial for most applications of liquid crystals, including LCDs. The researchers expect this technology to be considerably simpler and cheaper than other multidomain approaches that are currently used. (2018-05-11)

Kazan University puts forth ideas on the nature of dark matter
As we currently know, dark energy and dark matter comprise 96 percent of the total mass of the Universe. Two main hypotheses about the nature of dark matter are presently debated. One of them posits that dark matter consists of massive compact halo objects, the other ascribes this property to weakly interacting mass particles. (2019-02-05)

Evading in-flight lightning strikes
A new MIT study shows that electrically charging airplanes may reduce their risk of being struck by lightning. (2018-03-09)

Relativity matters: Two opposing views of the magnetic force reconciled
Our understanding of how a point-particle carrying a charge moves in presence of an inhomogenous magnetic field relied until now on two theories that were believed to differ. In a new study just published in EPJ C, the authors Johann Rafelski and colleagues from the University of Arizona, USA, succeeded in resolving this ambiguity. Their solution makes it possible to characterise the interaction of particles whose speed is close to the speed of light in the presence of inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields. (2018-01-29)

Fleet of automated electric taxis could deliver environmental and energy benefits
It may be only a matter of time before urban dwellers can hail a self-driving taxi, so researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley decided to analyze the cost, energy, and environmental implications of a fleet of self-driving electric vehicles operating in Manhattan. They found that shared automated electric vehicles, or SAEVs, could get the job done at a lower cost - by an order of magnitude - than present-day taxis while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption. (2018-03-28)

Quantum dot lasers move a step closer with electric-pumping development at NTU Singapore
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a way to make Colloidal Quantum Dots produce laser light with the help of an electric field. (2019-11-27)

Researchers at University of Pennsylvania develop method for mass production of nanogap electrodes
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a reliable, reproducible method for parallel fabrication of multiple nanogap electrodes, a development crucial to the creation of mass-produced nanoscale electronics. (2007-08-16)

New NiMH batteries perform better when made from recycled old NiMH batteries
A new method for recycling old batteries can provide better performing and cheaper rechargeable hydride batteries (NiMH) as shown in a new study by researchers at Stockholm University. (2020-06-01)

The dawn of gallium oxide microelectronics
Pushing semiconductor technology to its full potential requires smaller designs at higher energy density, and transparent conductive oxides are a key emerging material, offering the unlikely combination of conductivity and transparency over the visual spectrum. One conductive oxide has unique properties that allow it to function well in power switching: gallium oxide, a material with an incredibly large bandgap. In this week's Applied Physics Letters, researchers outline a case for producing microelectronics using gallium oxide. (2018-02-06)

Optical generation of ultrasound via photoacoustic effect
Limitations of the piezoelectric array technologies conventionally used for ultrasonics inspired researchers to explore an alternative mechanism for generating ultrasound via light (the photoacoustic effect). Coupling this with 3-D printing, the group was able to generate sounds fields with specific shapes for potential use in biological cell manipulation and drug delivery. As the group reports in this week's Applied Physics Letters, their work focuses on using the photoacoustic effect to control ultrasound fields in 3-D. (2017-02-28)

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