Popular Electrical Engineering News and Current Events

Popular Electrical Engineering News and Current Events, Electrical Engineering News Articles.
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Beat the heat
University of Utah mechanical engineering associate professor Mathieu Francoeur has discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. This could lead to devices such as laptop computers and cellphones with much longer battery life and solar panels that are much more efficient at converting radiant heat to energy. (2019-07-10)

Behind the mask
It could be the most unexpected display of patterns since crop circles - the self-assembly of a minute array of pillars in a sheet of plastic resin. (1999-12-01)

UToledo engineer creates solution to cheaper, longer lasting battery packs
The new technology called a bilevel equalizer is the first hybrid that combines the high performance of an active equalizer with the low cost of the passive equalizer. (2018-03-06)

Algorithm accurately predicts how electromagnetic waves and magnetic materials interact
UCLA Samueli engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies. (2018-09-10)

New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)

Spray coated tactile sensor on a 3D surface for robotic skin
A KAIST research team has reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating. (2018-09-20)

Pascali honored for contributions to engineering education
Raresh Pascali, instructional associate professor in the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program at the University of Houston, has been named the 2016 recipient of the Ross Kastor Educator Award. The award, named for a longtime drilling engineer with Shell Oil Co., is presented by the petroleum division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. It recognizes dedication to improving engineering and science awareness for students and improving educational opportunities for future industry leaders. (2016-05-17)

Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a system that turn carbon emissions into usable energy. (2019-01-19)

Video game system technology helping physical therapists, athletic trainers
Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians and athletic trainers analyze how we move -- it also is very expensive. Some motion labs can cost upward of $100,000. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers is finding that the depth camera often associated with video game systems can provide a variety of health care providers with objective information to improve patient care. (2017-12-07)

New sensors track dopamine in the brain for more than year
MIT neuroscientists devised a way to measure dopamine in the brain for up to a year, which they believe will teach them much more about its role in key brain functions and in disorders such as depression and Parkinson's disease. (2018-09-12)

App that will extend your smartphone battery life
New research out of the University of Waterloo has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day. (2018-08-15)

A 'virtual heart' to simulate arrhythmia
A group of researchers from MIPT and Ghent University have proposed a mathematical model which is able to determine the factors responsible for the formation of different fibrosis patterns, which are believed to cause arrhythmia. To reproduce the formation of cardiac tissue, the researchers took a mathematical model -- one that is widely applied to study tissue growth -- and optimized it using the previously collected experimental data. (2017-09-06)

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the future
A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending. (2018-03-09)

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteries
UBC researchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible. (2018-06-19)

Engineering researchers use laser to 'weld' neurons
University of Alberta researchers have developed a method of connecting neurons, using ultrashort laser pulses -- a breakthrough technique that opens the door to new medical research and treatment opportunities. Neurons are cells in the nervous system that are responsible for transferring information between the brain and the rest of the body. The team is the first ever to find a way to bond neurons and in doing so, is giving researchers a powerful new tool. (2016-02-09)

Switched-on DNA
DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices. Much like flipping your light switch at home -- only on a scale 1,000 times smaller than a human hair -- an ASU-led team has now developed the first controllable DNA switch to regulate the flow of electricity within a single, atomic-sized molecule. (2017-02-20)

Optical magnetic field sensor can detect signals from the nervous system
The human body is controlled by electrical impulses in the brain, the heart and nervous system. These electrical signals create tiny magnetic fields, which doctors could use to diagnose various diseases, for example diseases of the brain or heart problems in young fetuses. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have now succeeded in developing a method for extremely precise measurements of such ultra-small magnetic fields with an optical magnetic field sensor. The results are published in the scientific journal, Scientific Reports. (2016-07-15)

Controlling quantum interactions in a single material
By demonstrating that multiple quantum interactions can coexist and be controlled in a single material, researchers open the door for ultrafast, low-power electronics and quantum computers. (2018-02-05)

HKU Engineering Professor Ron Hui named a Fellow by the UK Royal Academy of Engineering
Professor Ron Hui, Chair Professor of Power Electronics and Philip Wong Wilson Wong Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Hong Kong, has been named a Fellow by the Royal Academy of Engineering, UK, one of the most prestigious national academies. (2016-11-02)

Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. The cells organized themselves in the scaffold to create engineered heart tissue that beats synchronously in culture. When the human-derived heart muscle patch was surgically placed onto a mouse heart after a heart attack, it significantly improved heart function and decreased the amount of dead heart tissue. (2017-01-25)

Lightning-fast communications
Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of electricity to shuttle data. (2017-11-06)

Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays
AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics -- but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. Now, U of T Engineering have designed a new approach: using machine learning to create computer generated X-rays to augment AI training sets. (2018-07-06)

Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers. (2019-03-29)

With a simple coating, nanowires show a dramatic increase in efficiency and sensitivity
By applying a coating to individual silicon nanowires, researchers at Harvard and Berkeley have significantly improved the materials' efficiency and sensitivity. (2011-07-06)

New brain mapping tool produces higher resolution data during brain surgery
Researchers have developed a new device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries. (2017-05-24)

Engineering academic elected a Fellow of the IEEE
A University of Bristol academic has been elected a Fellow of the world's largest and most prestigious professional association for the advancement of technology. (2015-12-01)

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy. (2018-11-14)

IBM-EPFL-NJIT team demonstrates novel synaptic architecture for brain inspired computing
Two New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) researchers, working with collaborators from the IBM Research Zurich Laboratory and the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, have demonstrated a novel synaptic architecture that could lead to a new class of information processing systems inspired by the brain. (2018-07-10)

Thin to win
University of Utah electrical and computer engineering researchers have developed a new kind of optical lens that is much thinner and lighter than conventional camera lenses that also works with night imaging, a future boon for smartphones that could flatten those unsightly 'camera bumps' as well as for drones and night vision cameras for soldiers. (2019-10-08)

Scientists demonstrated 1.3 μm submilliamp threshold quantum dot micro-lasers on Si
A group of researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara, successfully demonstrated record-small electrically pumped micro-lasers epitaxially grown on industry standard (001) silicon substrates in a recent study. A submilliamp threshold of 0.6 mA, emitting at the near-infrared (1.3?m) was achieved for a micro-laser with a radius of 5 μm. The thresholds and footprints are orders of magnitude smaller than those previously reported lasers epitaxially grown on Si. (2017-09-18)

Stroke patients take the lead in their rehabilitation
EPFL spin-off Intento has developed a patient-controlled electrical-stimulation device that helps stroke victims regain mobility in paralyzed arms. The promising results of the first clinical study are published in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. (2017-05-09)

A step closer to quantum computers: NUS researchers show how to directly observe quantum spin effects
A team led by Associate Professor Yang Hyunsoo from the National University of Singapore Faculty of Engineering has found a practical way to observe and examine the quantum effects of electrons in topological insulators and heavy metals. This could later pave the way for the development of advanced quantum computing components and devices. (2018-07-16)

A powerful catalyst for electrolysis of water that could help harness renewable energy
An international collaboration of Scientists at Dongguk University developed a novel nickel-based hydroxide compound that can be used as a powerful catalyst for the electrolysis of water. This material could also be useful for developing renewable energy sources. (2019-01-25)

Slow, steady waves keep brain humming
Very slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions. (2018-03-29)

Keep the light off: A material with improved mechanical performance in the dark
Nagoya University researchers found that zinc sulfide crystals were brittle under normal lighting conditions at room temperature, but highly plastic when deformed in complete darkness. Deformation of zinc sulfide crystals in the dark also narrowed their band gap, which controls electrical conductivity. The team's findings showed the mechanical and electronic properties of inorganic semiconductors are sensitive to light, revealing a possible route to engineer the performance of inorganic semiconductors, which are important in electronics. (2018-05-17)

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics
University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics. (2018-02-14)

Searching beyond graphene for new wonder materials
Graphene, the two-dimensional, ultra lightweight and super-strong carbon film, has been hailed as a wonder material since its discovery in 2004. Now researchers are going beyond graphene and preparing other 2-D films with extraordinary properties for applications in wearable electronics, sensors and energy storage. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, surveys this expanding landscape. (2017-05-31)

New method of characterizing graphene
Scientists have developed a new method of characterizing graphene's properties without applying disruptive electrical contacts, allowing them to investigate both the resistance and quantum capacitance of graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Researchers from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel's Department of Physics reported their findings in the journal Physical Review Applied. (2017-05-30)

Good vibrations for the future of computing
A vibration-driven logic gate could form the basis for the next generation of efficient, low-power computers. (2017-10-03)

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