Popular Electronics News and Current Events

Popular Electronics News and Current Events, Electronics News Articles.
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Behind the mask
It could be the most unexpected display of patterns since crop circles - the self-assembly of a minute array of pillars in a sheet of plastic resin. (1999-12-01)

Algorithm accurately predicts how electromagnetic waves and magnetic materials interact
UCLA Samueli engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies. (2018-09-10)

Electric cloth
Evening gowns with interwoven LEDs may look extravagant, but the light sources need a constant power supply from devices that are as well wearable, durable, and lightweight. Chinese scientists have manufactured fibrous electrodes for wearable devices that are flexible and excel by their high energy density. A microfluidic technology was key for the preparation of the electrode material was a microfluidic technology, as shown in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2019-10-18)

New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)

Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots
A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. And, they claim, these microscale machines -- equipped with electronic, photonic and chemical payloads -- could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms. (2018-01-03)

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the future
A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending. (2018-03-09)

Spying on topology
Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists from the Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have demonstrated for the first time how to tell apart topological materials from their regular -- trivial -- counterparts within a millionth of a billionth of a second by probing it with ultra-fast laser light. (2019-10-02)

Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defects
A paper in today's Nature Electronics details an innovation from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York that provides robust protection against circuitry damage that affects signal transmission. (2018-03-09)

Controlling quantum interactions in a single material
By demonstrating that multiple quantum interactions can coexist and be controlled in a single material, researchers open the door for ultrafast, low-power electronics and quantum computers. (2018-02-05)

Just add water
Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors (2019-09-16)

HKU Engineering Professor Ron Hui named a Fellow by the UK Royal Academy of Engineering
Professor Ron Hui, Chair Professor of Power Electronics and Philip Wong Wilson Wong Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Hong Kong, has been named a Fellow by the Royal Academy of Engineering, UK, one of the most prestigious national academies. (2016-11-02)

New chemical method could revolutionize graphene
University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics. (2017-06-14)

Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

Keep the light off: A material with improved mechanical performance in the dark
Nagoya University researchers found that zinc sulfide crystals were brittle under normal lighting conditions at room temperature, but highly plastic when deformed in complete darkness. Deformation of zinc sulfide crystals in the dark also narrowed their band gap, which controls electrical conductivity. The team's findings showed the mechanical and electronic properties of inorganic semiconductors are sensitive to light, revealing a possible route to engineer the performance of inorganic semiconductors, which are important in electronics. (2018-05-17)

New graphene-based material could revolutionize electronics industry
The most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity has been invented by a team from the University of Exeter. Called GraphExeter, the material could revolutionize the creation of wearable electronic devices, such as clothing containing computers, phones and MP3 players. (2012-04-27)

Engineering academic elected a Fellow of the IEEE
A University of Bristol academic has been elected a Fellow of the world's largest and most prestigious professional association for the advancement of technology. (2015-12-01)

Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)

A major step forward in organic electronics
Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectronics. (2018-01-11)

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. (2018-02-01)

New sensor for measuring electric field strength
Standard Sensors for measuring electrical fields have one big problem: they usually distort the electric field they are supposed to measure. The problem gets worse if the sensor has to be grounded to provide a reference point. The new sensor developed in Vienna works in a different way. Two tiny silicon structures are displaced relative to each other, their movement is measured with light. (2018-01-24)

Technology innovation for neurology
TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco has developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier. (2020-05-13)

UNIST researchers develop highly stretchable aqueous batteries
A team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has succeedeed in developing world's first stretchable aqueous Li-ion batteries that may power the next generation of wearable devices. (2018-01-26)

New technology standard could shape the future of electronics design
Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a way of enhancing the capabilities of an emerging nanotechnology that could open the door to a new generation of electronics. (2018-01-24)

Researchers quantify factors for reducing power semiconductor resistance by two-thirds
Researchers in Japan announced that they have quantified for the first time the impacts of three electron-scattering mechanisms for determining the resistance of silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductor devices in power semiconductor modules. They found that resistance under the SiC interface can be reduced by two-thirds by suppressing electron scattering by the charges, a discovery that is expected to help reduce energy consumption in electric power equipment by lowering the resistance of SiC power semiconductors. (2017-12-04)

A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level. It's an advance that could open the door to an increasingly interconnected world, enabling manufacturers to add 'smart,' wireless capabilities to any number of large or small products or objects -- like wearable sensors and computers for people and animals -- that curve, bend, stretch and move. (2017-09-28)

Electronically-smooth '3-D graphene': A bright future for trisodium bismuthide
Researchers have found that the topological material trisodium bismuthide (Na3Bi) can be manufactured to be as 'electronically smooth' as the highest-quality graphene-based alternative, while maintaining graphene's high electron mobility. (2017-12-22)

Researchers at University of Pennsylvania develop method for mass production of nanogap electrodes
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a reliable, reproducible method for parallel fabrication of multiple nanogap electrodes, a development crucial to the creation of mass-produced nanoscale electronics. (2007-08-16)

Artificial 'skin' gives robotic hand a sense of touch
A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices. (2017-09-13)

Blowin' in the wind -- A source of energy?
It may in the future be possible to harvest energy with the aid of leaves fluttering in the wind. Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa. (2018-03-26)

Flexible TVs and high performance wearable smart tech one step closer
Flexible televisions, tablets and phones as well as 'truly wearable' smart tech are a step closer thanks to a nanoscale transistor created by researchers at The University of Manchester and Shandong University in China. (2018-04-18)

Nanowires, the future of electronics
The current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design. The research led by Aurelio Mateo-Alonso (Ikerbasque researcher at POLYMAT, the Basque Excellence Research Center (BERC), a partner of the UPV/EHU) into nanowires is being published today in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. (2017-06-07)

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami
A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using a 'Kirigami' designs. The Kirigami-based bioprobe enables one to follow the shape of spherical and large deformable biological samples such as heart and brain tissues. In addition, its low strain-force characteristic reduces the force induced on organs, thereby enabling minimally invasive biological signal recording. (2017-12-08)

Smart new method to manufacture organic solar cells
The ability to use cheap materials and simple manufacturing methods are two huge advantages of printed organic solar cells. Olle Inganäs, professor at Linköping University, is head of a research group that has now developed an even simpler method to manufacture solar cell modules. The results have been published in the scientific journal npj Flexible Electronics. (2018-02-05)

Study unlocks full potential of 'supermaterial' graphene
New research reveals why the 'supermaterial' graphene has not transformed electronics as promised, and shows how to double its performance and finally harness its extraordinary potential. (2018-11-29)

Game changer for organic solar cells
Researchers develop a simple processing technique that could cut the cost of organic photovoltaics and wearable electronics. (2016-12-05)

Optical and electrical bistability study sheds light on next-gen high speed data transfer
Today, electrical bistable devices are the foundation of digital electronics, but the bandwidth of these electronic computers is limited by the signal delay of time constants important to electronic logic operations. In an attempt to mitigate these problems, scientists have considered the development of an optical digital computer. This week, in the Journal of Applied Physics, researchers present their findings regarding the optical and electrical bistability of a single transistor operated at room temperature. (2017-09-18)

Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes
Researchers from Japan have taken a step toward faster and more advanced electronics by developing a way to better measure and manipulate conductive materials through scanning tunneling microscopy. (2018-10-11)

The next generation of power electronics? Gallium nitride doped with beryllium
Physicists at Aalto University have made a breakthrough in revising methods largely discarded 15 years ago. They have discovered a microscopic mechanism that will allow gallium nitride semiconductors to be used in electronic devices that distribute large amounts of electric power. (2017-11-09)

Dawn of organic single crystal electronics
Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences (Japan) have developed a method for high performance doping of organic single crystal. Furthermore, they succeeded in the Hall effect measurement of the crystal -- the world's first case. The research has been published in the Advanced Materials. (2017-04-28)

NTU scientists create customizable, fabric-like power source for wearable electronics
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have created a customizable, fabric-like power source that can be cut, folded or stretched without losing its function. Being highly stretchable, these flexible power sources are promising next-generation 'fabric' energy storage devices that could be integrated into wearable electronics. The team's findings have been published in the journal Advanced Materials. (2018-01-30)

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