Popular Emergency Department News and Current Events

Popular Emergency Department News and Current Events, Emergency Department News Articles.
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For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in half
Urban children with asthma who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were less than half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma. (2018-01-09)

Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination rates
A Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months. (2018-01-24)

Perceptions of chronic fatigue syndrome in the emergency department
Findings from a novel online questionnaire of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) suggest the majority of these patients do not receive proper care, say researchers from Georgetown University Medical Center in the first investigation of the presentation of CFS in the emergency department. (2019-01-10)

Study reveals lack of self-awareness among doctors when prescribing opioids
As health providers struggle to curb the epidemic of opioid abuse, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that 65 percent of emergency department (ED) physicians surveyed underestimated how often they prescribed the highly addictive pain killers to patients. (2018-03-27)

Referrals by private ERs are prevalent in communities with a public hospital
The practice of indirect referrals by nonpublic emergency departments and their affiliated physicians are prevalent in communities with a public hospital option. Uninsured patients are the most affected. (2017-12-27)

Changes in perspective may affect how useful drones really are
A recent study finds that users have trouble utilizing images from unmanned aerial systems (UASs), or drones, to find the position of objects on the ground. The finding highlights challenges facing the use of UAS technology for emergency operations and other applications, while offering guidance for future technology and training development. (2017-10-10)

Study reveals benefits of having GPs in Emergency Departments
A new study from the University of Liverpool provides evidence that locating a General Practitioner (GP) in a hospital emergency department (ED) can reduce waiting times and admissions, but may increases antibiotic prescribing. (2017-10-06)

When treating athletes for heat stroke, 'cool first, transport second'
Athletes who suffer life-threatening heat stroke should be cooled on site before they are taken to the hospital, according to an expert panel's report published in the journal Prehospital Emergency Care. The principle of 'cool first, transport second' differs from the usual practice of calling 911 and getting to the hospital as soon as possible. (2018-02-27)

A new algorithm designed to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation more effective
Researchers in the UPV/EHU's Signal and Communications Group in collaboration with researchers in the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) have developed an algorithm to guide an effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation manoeuvre. Based on chest acceleration, it calculates the depth and frequency at which the chest compressions are being performed. The prestigious PLOS ONE journal reports on the research by publishing a validation of the algorithm with acceleration signals recorded during actual instances of cardiorespiratory arrest. (2018-03-15)

Blood stored longer may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shock
In a collaborative study using a mouse model, researchers have found mechanistic links between older stored red blood cell transfusions and subsequent bacterial pneumonia. This may reveal new approaches to improve safety of stored red blood cell transfusions. The key player is free heme, a breakdown product from degraded red blood cells (2018-03-09)

Emergency department program for older adults cuts hospitalizations by 33 percent
Roughly one third of all older patients age 65 and older visiting emergency departments nationwide are admitted to the hospital. But an emergency department program focused on geriatric transitional care has reduced the risk of unnecessary admission of older patients at Northwestern Medicine by 33 percent, according to a new study from Northwestern Univeristy, Mount Sinai Medical Center and St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center. (2018-01-11)

Social media for medical journals operates in 'wild west,' needs more support to succeed
In this first study to examine social media editor roles at medical journals, researchers at Northwestern Medicine found that while medical journals are using social media more to extend the reach of new research, the responsibilities and measures of success for these roles aren't well defined or supported. More support is needed to get the information to the public more efficiently. (2018-10-18)

More can be done to prevent children from having in-flight medical emergencies
Resources are limited on an airplane during an in-flight emergency and access to care is not always immediate. A new study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine reveals that 15.5 percent of in-flight emergencies involve children and that one in six cases require additional care. (2019-07-25)

Ultrasound for children with abdominal trauma
Despite evidence showing that the routine use of sonography in hospital emergency departments can safely improve care for adults when evaluating for possible abdominal trauma injuries, researchers at UC Davis Medical Center could not identify any significant improvements in care for pediatric trauma patients. (2017-06-13)

General emergency departments use CT to diagnose abdominal pain in children more often
A child with non-traumatic abdominal pain, a common symptom of appendicitis, is more likely to receive a computed tomography (CT) scan in a general emergency department (ED) than if he or she visited a pediatric emergency department, according to a study published in Pediatrics. (2017-09-15)

End-of-life decision-making for people with intellectual disabilities
There has been little research on end-of-life decision-making for the growing population of older Americans with intellectual disabilities. Through a series of interviews with five different emergency medical service agencies in upstate New York, UB researchers asked EMS providers specifically how pre-hospital orders shape what they do in the case of someone with an intellectual disability. (2017-10-06)

Patients who get opioids in the ER are less likely to use them long-term
Compared to other medical settings, emergency patients who are prescribed opioids for the first time in the emergency department are less likely to become long-term users and more likely to be prescribed these powerful painkillers in accordance with The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. A paper analyzing 5.2 million prescriptions for opioids is being published online today in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2017-09-26)

Multimodal intervention can reduce PIVC insertion in the emergency department
Peripheral intravenous cannula (PIVC) insertion in the emergency department can be reduced using a multimodal approach designed to support critical thinking and promote clinically appropriate peripheral intravenous cannula insertion and use. (2017-12-27)

Discontinuity of care puts older patients at higher risk of emergency hospitalization
Discontinuity of care puts older patients at higher risk of emergency hospitalization. (2017-11-15)

Pediatric emergency department physicians wary of discussing firearm injury prevention
Many emergency departments provide education on childhood injury prevention. But new research shows many physicians are leaving out one important topic: firearm injury prevention. The study abstract, 'Firearm Safety: A Survey on Practice Patterns, Knowledge and Opinions of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Providers,' will be presented Friday, Sept. 15 at the 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago. (2017-09-15)

Preserving the power of antibiotics
News release describes efforts to address inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in emergency departments and urgent-care centers nationwide, which a JAMA study published this past May found rates as high as 50 percent for acute respiratory infections in US emergency departments. Now the CDC has awarded UC Davis ED physician Larissa May a one-year grant to test two educational and behavioral interventions for physicians in emergency settings in California and Colorado. (2016-10-06)

Marker involved in lymphatic system connected to heart failure
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have found a new marker in the blood that is associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Surprisingly, the marker is not directly involved in how the heart functions, unlike most of the previously known markers. Instead, the new marker affects processes in the lymphatic system. (2018-03-07)

Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter -- a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber -- are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children. (2017-12-15)

Alcohol aromatherapy eases nausea in the ER
Nauseated patients in the emergency department who sniffed pads saturated with isopropyl alcohol were twice as likely to obtain relief from their symptoms as nauseated patients who sniffed pads saturated with saline solution, according to a study published online today in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Isopropyl Alcohol Nasal Inhalation for Nausea in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial'). (2015-12-08)

Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution
Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. Generic mobile phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality tests than the brand counterparts, according to analysis and case studies in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2019-07-25)

US regions with stricter gun laws have lower rates of pediatric injuries due to firearms
Regions of the United States that have the strictest gun laws also have the lowest rates of childhood firearm injuries, according to new research. The study abstract, 'Geographic Regions with Stricter Gun Laws Have Fewer Emergency Department Visits for Pediatric Firearm-Related Injuries: A Five-Year National Study,' will be presented Friday, Sept. 15, at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago. The northeastern US had the lowest rates of child injuries from guns. (2017-09-15)

More sensitive blood test diagnoses heart attacks faster
A new high-sensitivity blood test for heart attacks successfully diagnosed heart attacks faster and more accurately in the emergency room than the existing test. (2018-08-06)

Blood test for specific metabolites could reveal blocked arteries
A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. (2019-02-01)

New study to investigate role of sleep in chronic pain
Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options. (2016-12-05)

Mental health diagnoses among US children, youth continue to rise at alarming rate
The number of children and adolescents visiting the nation's emergency departments due to mental health concerns continued to rise at an alarming rate from 2012 through 2016, with mental health diagnoses for non-Latino blacks outpacing such diagnoses among youth of other racial/ethnic groups, according to a retrospective cross-sectional study presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. (2018-11-02)

Study examines emergency department visits for patients injured by law enforcement in the US
From 2006 to 2012, there were approximately 51,000 emergency department visits per year for patients injured by law enforcement in the United States, with this number stable over this time period, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery. (2017-04-19)

Seniors more likely to visit emergency department after home care visit from nurse
Patients who received home care visits from nurses were more likely to visit the emergency department during the evening on the same day, particularly for non-urgent issues, according to new research in CMAJ. (2018-04-30)

Study reveals gaps in follow-up care after concussion
Being discharged from a hospital trauma center after receiving treatment for a traumatic brain injury (TBI) does not necessarily mean that a patient has fully recovered. TBI can lead to long-lasting physical and cognitive symptoms, but a new study in JAMA Network Open suggests that many patients may not be receiving follow-up care. (2018-05-25)

Racial and ethnic differences seen in antibiotics prescribed for viral illnesses in pediatric EDs
Non-Latino white children seeking treatment for viral infections in the Emergency Department are about twice as likely to receive an antibiotic unnecessarily compared with non-Latino black children or Latino children, a multi-center study indicates. (2017-09-05)

Measuring the risks of extreme temperatures on public health
Heat and cold waves affect people with certain health conditions differently, highlighting the need for tailored public service risk communication. (2018-04-13)

An emergency method for measuring strontium levels in milk can be used in routine studies
The UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country's Nuclear and Radiological Safety research group is participating in validations of methods proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. In a recently published study, this group has tested the viability of a method proposed by the international agency to measure radioactive strontium in milk, developed for cases of nuclear emergency, so that it can be incorporated into routine radiological monitoring measurements. (2017-09-08)

Transitional care nurses in the geriatric emergency department reduce risk of inpatient admissions
Geriatric patients seen by transitional care nurses in the emergency department (ED) are less likely to be admitted to the hospital. (2018-01-10)

Link shown between thunderstorms and asthma attacks in metro Atlanta area
In the first in-depth study of its kind ever done in the Southeastern United States, researchers at the University of Georgia and Emory University have discovered a link between thunderstorms and asthma attacks in the metro Atlanta area that could have a (2008-07-10)

Active shooter simulations increase emergency department staff readiness and confidence
A new practice improvement initiative and study indicates active shooter training and simulations are vital to ensuring staff is equipped to respond effectively should their emergency department ever become a target for such an act of violence. (2018-08-27)

Saline use on the decline at Vanderbilt following landmark studies
Vanderbilt University Medical Center is encouraging its medical providers to stop using saline as intravenous fluid therapy for most patients, a change provoked by two companion landmark studies released today that are anticipated to improve survival and decrease kidney complications. (2018-02-27)

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