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Popular Emotions News and Current Events, Emotions News Articles.
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Brain neurons help keep track of time
Turning the theory of how the human brain perceives time on its head, a novel analysis in mice reveals that dopamine neuron activity plays a key role in judgment of time, slowing down the internal clock. (2016-12-08)
Can AI spot liars?
Though algorithms are increasingly being deployed in all facets of life, a new USC study has found that they fail basic tests as truth detectors. (2019-09-04)
Could mental math boost emotional health?
Engaging the brain's dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DL-PFC) while doing mental math may be connected with better emotional health, according to Duke researchers. (2016-10-10)
The digital transformation of news media and the rise of online disinformation
A new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre contains an overview of the relevant economic research literature on the digital transformation of news markets and related impact on the quality of news. (2018-04-27)
Using envy as a marketing tool can backfire
For decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. (2018-06-05)
Breast size dissatisfaction affects self-examination
New research shows that women who are dissatisfied with the size of their breasts are less likely to carry out regular self-examinations to screen for breast cancer. (2018-01-04)
Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisions
A lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don't make an effort to live more sustainably or takes steps to ameliorate climate change. (2018-02-13)
Humans will actually react pretty well to news of alien life
Hollywood has it wrong. Humans would actually react positively to news of alien life -- intelligent or microbial. (2018-02-16)
A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?
When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. (2017-11-17)
Study shows that chronic grief activates pleasure areas of the brain
Most of us experience the grief associated with the loss of a loved one at some point in our lives. (2008-06-20)
Brain's appetite regulator disrupted in obese teens
Researchers using advanced MRI to study obese adolescents found disrupted connectivity in the complex regions of the brain involved in regulating appetite, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. (2017-11-30)
Fear and hoping: Adding hope to health messages may motivate better behaviors
While fear about health concerns may grip people, adding a little hope to a message might make people more willing to take preventative actions, according to researchers. (2018-02-23)
People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories
People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (2018-03-06)
Lingering negative responses to stress linked with health a decade later
People whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with peers who are able to 'let it go,' according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2018-04-09)
Is it ok for parents to be supportive to children's negative emotions?
New research suggests that whereas mothers who are more supportive of their children's negative emotions rate their children as being more socially skilled, these same children appear less socially adjusted when rated by teachers. (2017-06-16)
Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will
Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports. (2018-01-18)
How tails help geckos and other vertebrates make great strides
A wagging tail is often associated with dogs' emotions, but the side-to-side motion may also help them take longer strides and move faster, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Riverside. (2017-09-07)
New study advances treatment options for PTSD
Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-11)
Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behavior
It's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2018-06-18)
Cringeworthy politics: Trump sparks 'embarrassment' spikes on Twitter
A piece of not-fake-news: there has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since Donald Trump took office. (2019-03-27)
Scientists map monogamy, jealousy in the monkey mind
A recent study at the California National Primate Research Center studied jealousy in pair-bonded titi monkeys. (2017-10-19)
People will desire something even more if you increase their focus on it
The relationship between desire and attention was long thought to only work in one direction: When a person desires something, they focus their attention on it. (2017-11-13)
Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. (2018-06-01)
Attention, bosses: Why angry employees are bad for business
According to University of Arizona research, employees who are angry are more likely to engage in unethical behavior at work -- even if the source of their anger is not job-related. (2016-11-14)
MDMA users more empathetic than other drug users
Long-term MDMA users have higher levels of empathy than cannabis and other drugs users, new research suggests. (2019-02-08)
Clothes make the woman: Less empathy towards women showing more skin
Sexualized representations, especially the emphasis of secondary sexual characteristics, can change the way we perceive an individual. (2018-01-11)
Is the key to sparking climate action a game?
New research led by UMass Lowell and published by PLoS ONE found that 81 percent of participants in the World Climate Simulation, a role-playing game of the UN climate talks, showed increased motivation to combat climate change, even among Americans who are free market proponents, a belief strongly linked to denial of human-caused climate change in the United States. (2018-09-06)
Daily stresses can trigger heart abnormalities during everyday life
Such common emotions as tension, frustration and sadness trigger frequent and painless heart abnormalities that can lead to permanent heart damage, a research team at Duke University Medical Center has concluded (1997-05-21)
Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social undermining: Study
A new Baylor study published in the Journal of Business Ethics suggests that feelings of ethical superiority can cause a chain reaction that is detrimental to you, your coworkers and your organization. (2018-04-24)
Recurring nightmares could reflect your daily frustrations
People who are frustrated because their basic psychological needs for autonomy, relatedness and feeling competent are not met are more likely to have a recurring bad dream and to analyze their dreams negatively. (2017-11-30)
Physiological markers for cutting, other self-harming behaviors by teenage girls found
Non-fatal, self-inflicted injuries by adolescent and young adult females have become major public health problems and researchers have found physiological evidence that this behavior may lead to a more serious psychological condition called borderline personality disorder. (2006-06-16)
Hitting rock bottom after job loss can be beneficial, study shows
Bottoming out as a result of job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2018-02-20)
Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged children
Children as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. (2018-06-20)
Teens who can describe negative emotions can stave off depression
Teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways are better protected against depression than their peers who can't. (2019-06-28)
Study offers more food for thought on kids' eating habits, emotions
A University of Texas at Dallas psychologist has examined the preconceptions about the effects of emotions on children's eating habits, creating the framework for future studies of how dietary patterns evolve in early childhood. (2018-02-21)
Best way to recognize emotions in others: Listen
If you want to know how someone is feeling, it might be better to close your eyes and use your ears: People tend to read others' emotions more accurately when they listen and don't look, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2017-10-10)
Parent-child therapy helps young children with depression
New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2018-06-20)
Chronic fatigue patients more likely to suppress emotions
Chronic fatigue syndrome patients report they are more anxious and distressed than people who don't have the condition, and they are also more likely to suppress those emotions. (2016-05-17)
Educational psychology: Finding the fun in maths
New work by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers on students' emotional attitudes to mathematics confirms that positive emotions and success at learning in math mutually reinforce each other. (2017-02-08)
I feel you: Emotional mirror neurons found in the rat
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have found that the rat brain activates the same cells when they observe the pain of others as when they experience pain themselves. (2019-04-11)
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