Popular Employees News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Employees News and Current Events, Employees News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Your stress and mine
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that people often project their own experiences with stress onto their colleagues and employees, causing miscommunication and, often, missed opportunities. (2017-11-13)

ASHG applauds passage of Canadian Genetic Non-Discrimination Act
The American Society of Human Genetics applauds yesterday's passage of S-201, the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act, in a 222-60 vote by the Parliament of Canada's House of Commons. Passage of S-201 will help ensure not only that an individual's genetic information remains private, but also that this information cannot be used in a way that harms them. It will help ensure that all Canadians can benefit from genetics-based clinical advances without fear of genetic discrimination. (2017-03-09)

Empowering workers can cause uncertainty and resentment
Attempts by managers to empower staff by delegating different work to them or asking for their opinions can be detrimental for employee productivity, research shows. (2017-11-29)

Flourishing under an abusive boss? You may be a psychopath, study shows
According to research from Notre Dame, certain types of 'psychopaths' actually benefit and flourish under abusive bosses. (2018-01-23)

Abusive bosses experience short-lived benefits
Being a jerk to your employees may actually improve your well-being, but only for a short while, suggests new research on abusive bosses co-authored by a Michigan State University business scholar. (2017-09-28)

Majority of mining-related injuries and illness in Illinois go unreported
Illnesses and injuries associated with working in Illinois mines are substantially underreported to the federal agency tasked with tracking these events, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine. (2018-03-09)

New health insurance benefit at U-M led to increased rates of IVF
In a new research letter appearing in JAMA detailing a first-of-its-kind study, a University of Michigan team compared the use of IVF among university employees before and after the addition of an insurance coverage benefit, finding a marked increase in the rate of use. (2019-11-13)

Study finds bad bosses could turn you into a great boss
A new University of Central Florida study suggests abuse and mistreatment by those at the top of an organization do not necessarily lead to abusive behavior by lower-level leaders. When offered leadership opportunities, prior victims of workplace abuse are more likely to treat their own subordinates better by learning from the bad behavior of their bosses. (2018-12-03)

Music at work increases cooperation, teamwork
Cornell University researchers found that music can have important effects on the cooperative spirits of those exposed to music. (2016-08-23)

Study finds consensus for arming school resource officers, division on arming teachers and other staff
A new study examined public support for arming school employees. The study found consensus for arming school resource officers, but division over whether to arm teachers and nonteaching staff. The research has clear implications for policy, including the possibility that support for arming school staff may diminish over time as young people (who are less supportive) make up a larger share of voters. (2021-02-03)

Managers can help prevent employees from working while sick
A new study indicates that managerial support can help prevent employees who work extremely hard out of an obsessive drive ('workaholics') from forcing themselves to attend work when feeling sick. (2017-08-09)

MED-EL convenes global hearing researchers for age-related hearing loss workshop
Leading scientists and hearing experts from around the world will gather for a scientific workshop sponsored by hearing implant leader MED-EL. The meeting will include ENT surgeons who specialize in older adults, research audiologists and rehabilitation therapists from the world's top universities and research centers. During the scientific exchange, attendees will discuss research and identify needs of candidates and users with the goal of improving the lives of older adults who live with hearing loss. (2017-01-13)

Finally! A solution to office thermostat wars
A new study published in the Journal of Energy and Buildings proposes a method that simultaneously optimizes individual office workers' productivity and energy consumption costs by automating the control of indoor environmental conditions including air quality, temperature and lighting. (2017-10-12)

Unhappy at work? The boss or the company may be to blame
If you are unhappy at work, it could be partly due to your boss' management style. Both over-controlling managers who use threats as a way to motivate employees, and organizations that do not appear to value individuals' contributions, frustrate our basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness (how we relate to others). This, in turn, is likely to have a negative impact on our well-being at work. (2012-01-18)

It's about time: Immediate rewards boost workplace motivation
New research from Kaitlin Woolley shows that immediate rewards increase enjoyment and interest in tasks more compared to rewards at the end of a task. (2018-06-06)

Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says
When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company's values, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-02-04)

Witnessing uncivil behavior
When people witness poor customer service, a manager's intervention can help reduce hostility toward the company or brand, according to WSU research. (2019-06-18)

Corporate social responsibility can backfire if employees don't think it's genuine
A new study looks at what happens when a company's employees view its efforts related to corporate social responsibility as substantive (perceived to be other-serving and genuinely aimed at supporting the common good) or symbolic (perceived as self-serving and performed primarily for reputation and to enhance profits). (2016-09-07)

Risky alcohol consumption can increase at time of retirement
Every tenth employee increases their alcohol consumption to risky levels at the time of retirement from full-time employment. However, the increase seems to be temporary as risky drinking often decreases during the retirement. For most pensioners, alcohol consumption remains below the risk levels before and after retirement. The results of the new Finnish study were published in the esteemed Addiction journal. (2017-03-31)

Why do employees cheat? Too much pressure
When employees feel their job depends on meeting high benchmarks, some fudge results in order to stay employed, according to a new study. (2017-11-16)

Mindfulness at work: UBC study first to uncover positive benefits for teams
Challenges and differences in opinion are inevitable when working in a team. But new research from the UBC Sauder School of Business suggests some of these conflicts can be reduced, or even avoided, through team mindfulness. (2018-05-03)

Good grief: Victimized employees don't get a break
As if being picked on wasn't bad enough, victims of workplace mistreatment may also be seen as bullies themselves, even if they've never engaged in such behavior. Adding insult to injury, victims may even be seen by supervisors as worse employees, despite exemplary performance. Bullies, on the other hand, may be given a pass if they are liked by their supervisor. (2019-03-08)

These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership
Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness. (2019-05-16)

Animals and fungi enhance the performance of forests.
In addition to the diversity of tree species, the variety of animal and fungus species also has a decisive influence on the performance of forests. Forest performance comprises many facets besides timber production, such as carbon storage and climate regulation. The study is based on ten years of research in species-rich subtropical forests. A team of researchers led by iDiv and the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg has published the results in the new issue of Nature Communications. (2018-08-01)

Swiss employees do not hold back on cynical behavior
Every fourth employee regards promises made by the company they work for as having been broken and every third is not satisfied with their relationship to their superior and with their co-workers. This is shown by the current results of the Swiss Human Relations Barometer of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich. Although more than half of the employees feel emotional ties to their employer, there is widespread cynicism in the workplace, e.g. in the form of derogatory remarks and ridicule. (2016-10-12)

Large study finds workplace foods contribute to unhealthy eating
A study of 5,222 employees across the US found that the foods people get at work tend to contain high amounts of sodium and refined grains and very little whole grains and fruit. (2018-06-11)

Gender perceptions of sexual harassment can influence workplace policy effectiveness
Although 98 percent of all organizations have sexual harassment policies, sexual harassment remains an issue in the workplace. Researchers at the University of Missouri are evaluating how employees' interpretations of sexual harassment policies can invalidate the purpose of the policies. They found that employee perceptions of how exactly 'sexual harassment' is defined by a company's policy can, in effect, eliminate or reshape the meaning of these policies and contradict the norms and values of the companies that try to enforce them. (2016-04-07)

Discounting humanity: Bargain hunters see customer service workers as less human
Everyone loves a bargain, but new research suggests some employees may be getting short-changed when it comes to how consumers perceive them when they are price-conscious. (2017-12-20)

Empowered employees are more proactive -- even when they don't trust their leader
New research confirms that employees with empowering leaders are more proactive -- and, for the first time, shows that this effect occurs by increasing employee confidence to undertake tasks beyond the job description. The researchers elaborate a model that explains why, and when, empowering leadership can promote proactivity in the workplace, and provide suggestions for managers and organizations. (2017-11-01)

Wanted: More female managers
Do common stereotypes about female characteristics keep the number of women in management roles low? This is the question posed by Janka Stoker and her colleagues from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands in their study looking at the factors which relate to managerial stereotypes. Their findings, published online in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology, suggest that increasing the proportion of female managers is an effective way to overcome managerial stereotyping. (2011-03-22)

Curiosity can predict employees' ability to creatively solve problems, research shows
Employers who are looking to hire creative problem-solvers should consider candidates with strong curiosity traits, and personality tests may be one way to tease out those traits in prospective employees, new research from Oregon State University shows. (2016-11-17)

Research explores workers' response to abusive supervision
A recent Naveen Jindal School of Management study examined the damaging impact abusive supervision has in the workplace including the ways employees respond with retaliatory behavior, which lowers productivity. (2018-02-08)

It pays to be nice to your employees, new study shows
New research from Binghamton University, State University at New York finds that showing compassion to subordinates almost always pays off, especially when combined with the enforcement of clear goals and benchmarks. (2018-09-11)

Improve your information security by giving employees more options
A recent study published in the Journal of Management Information Systems suggests information security managers and supervisors could have greater success in motivating employees to act more securely by avoiding cold, authoritative commands, and instead create security messages that are relatable and provide options for how employees can better protect information and respond to threats. (2018-03-26)

Researchers successfully train employees to respond to opioid overdose, administer naloxone
A small study shows that business managers and staff -- such as those running coffee shops and fast-food restaurants -- can be trained to reverse opioid overdoses, which are known to occur in public bathrooms. (2018-09-21)

Top professional performance through psychopathy
The term 'psychopath' is not flattering: such people are considered cold, manipulative, do not feel any remorse and seek thrills without any fear -- and all that at other's expense. A study by psychologists at the University of Bonn is now shattering this image. They claim that a certain form of psychopathy can lead to top professional performance, without harming others or the company. (2017-02-23)

Family physician calls for a return to human connection
How can medical practices create and sustain healthy cultures at a time of rapid and often stressful change? The answer, according to family physician David Loxterkamp, MD, lies in human connection. (2017-11-20)

What is effect of workplace wellness program on employee health, job performance, economics?
Employees of a large multistate warehouse retail company working in locations with a workplace wellness program reported some better health behaviors after 18 months than coworkers in locations without wellness programming. However, there were no statistically significant differences in other measures. (2019-04-16)

Greater job satisfaction for transgender employees
Transgender individuals in the workplace can sometimes feel stigmatized, either through the actions and attitudes of their coworkers, or through their own fears of being treated as an 'other.' But recent research from Larry Martinez at Portland State University shows that the experiences of employees who transition genders is highly dependent on the interactions they have with their coworkers. (2016-11-23)

Self-help book works to combat burnout and stress -- without a therapist
Around a third of all employees find their work stressful. Interventions for stress and burnout are available, but often not accessible for many employees. A self-help book based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has the potential to reduce burnout, stress and symptoms of depression - without any therapist contact. Researchers from the University of Basel have reported these findings in the scientific journal Work & Stress. (2017-11-27)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.