Popular Endoscopy News and Current Events

Popular Endoscopy News and Current Events, Endoscopy News Articles.
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New studies add to understanding of treatments for Barrett's esophagus
The October issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy features several new studies evaluating various treatments for Barrett's esophagus (BE). BE is a condition in which there are unusual changes to the cells lining the esophagus. It is believed to be most commonly due to inflammation from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Sometimes these changes may be considered precancerous. Endoscopic treatments for BE focus on removing or destroying the problematic tissue. (2017-10-06)

New recommendations for endoscopic eradication therapy in Barrett's esophagus
A new guideline by the ASGE Standards of Practice Committee offers evidence-based recommendations and clinical guidelines addressing key issues related to Endoscopic Eradication Therapy (EET) in the management of Barrett's esophagus (BE)-related lesions. (2018-04-06)

Low value surgical procedures should be avoided to reduce costs and improve patient care
Reducing the use of 'low value' interventions that deliver little benefit is vital to cut healthcare costs. (2017-11-08)

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to stomach virus
Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as ME, is linked to a stomach virus, suggests research published ahead of print in Journal of Clinical Pathology. The researchers base their findings on 165 patients with ME, all of whom were subjected to endoscopy because of longstanding gut complaints. (2007-09-13)

ASGE encourages patients to speak to their doctor about colorectal cancer screening options
Results of the National CT Colonography Trial, published in the Sept. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, show improvements in the technology's ability to diagnose intermediate- to large-sized polyps in the colon, but this method of testing is not as effective in diagnosing small polyps. CT colonography is one of several colorectal cancer screening options. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy encourages patients to speak to their doctor about the screening method that is best for them. (2008-09-17)

Study identifies double-balloon enteroscopy as cost-effective approach for obscure GI bleeding
A cost-effectiveness analysis conducted by researchers at Stanford University Hospital in Calif., shows that an initial double-balloon enteroscopy is a cost-effective approach for patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. However, capsule-directed DBE, which is when the findings from an initial small bowel capsule endoscopy exam are used to guide the DBE procedure, may be preferred as the initial test due to the potential for fewer complications and decreased utilization of endoscopic resources. (2008-11-24)

New guidelines update recommendations on colorectal cancer screening
A new guideline on colorectal cancer screening released March 5, 2008 by an expert group representing a broad spectrum of health care organizations, including the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the American Cancer Society, offers recommendations for various alternatives for colorectal cancer detection and states a strong preference for screening tests that can prevent colorectal cancer. (2008-03-06)

Blue dye tablet helps identify polyps during colonoscopy
Ingestion of a blue dye tablet during bowel prep for colonoscopy could be a significant advance in the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). When used in conjunction with colonoscopy, the blue dye increased adenoma detection rate (ADR) by nearly 9 percent, according to a study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. (2018-05-22)

Health groups issue updated colorectal cancer screening guidelines
The American Cancer Society, the American College of Radiology, and the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer (a group that comprises representatives from the American College of Gastroenterology, American Gastroenterological Association, and American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy) have released the first-ever joint consensus guidelines for colorectal cancer screening. (2008-03-05)

Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagus
Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise for preventing deaths from esophageal adenocarcinoma. (2018-01-17)

Colorectal cancer patients need colonoscopy after cancer resection
It is critically important that colorectal cancer patients undergo colonoscopy after surgery to ensure that they do not have a second colon cancer, and to find and remove any additional polyps. According to new recommendations from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, the evidence shows that post-operative colonoscopy is associated with improved overall survival for colorectal cancer patients. Between 0.7 and 7 percent of colorectal cancer patients have a second, concurrent cancer. (2016-02-16)

Experimental drug eases effects of gluten for celiac patients on gluten-free diet
An investigational new drug offers hope of relief for celiac disease patients who are inadvertently exposed to gluten while on a gluten-free diet. Findings of the first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. Inadvertent exposure to gluten can be a frequent occurrence for celiac patients that triggers symptoms, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, due to intestinal damage. (2018-05-22)

New alternative to surgery lets doctors remove suspicious polyps, keep colon intact
A UCLA team of surgeons and gastroenterologists has been performing a new, minimally invasive procedure to remove large and hard-to-reach polyps while keeping the colon intact. The procedure, which combines two minimally invasive techniques, has currently been performed at only a handful of medical centers in the United States. (2013-06-17)

Opioid-related adverse drug events common after surgery, associated with worse outcomes
Opioid-related adverse drug events were common among patients undergoing surgery  and endoscopy procedures in the hospital and they were associated with worse patient outcomes. (2018-05-23)

Report from groundbreaking 'EndoVators Summit' offers guidance for obesity treatment
A recently published white paper from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Association for Bariatric Endoscopy breaks new ground in defining the role and value of the latest approaches for obesity management. The paper reports on the scope and impact of the obesity problem as well as the multiple factors and players involved in treating this chronic condition. (2017-11-09)

Test for esophageal cancer could save millions of lives
Cancer of the esophagus claims more than 400,000 lives around the world each year. With no efficient, reliable method of screening for the disease, by the time symptoms become apparent, it's often too late to save the patient. (2019-01-22)

A new breakthrough in timing of urgent endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding patients
Endoscopy plays a major role in the diagnosis and therapy of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. An endoscopic group in Italy investigated whether a simple clinical score prior to endoscopy was efficient in selecting those patients. Their study showed that such an endoscopic triage is strongly associated with the detection of endoscopic signs of recent hemorrhage. (2008-09-10)

Water method for unsedated colonoscopy; interval between prep and colonoscopy predicts prep quality
A study appearing in the monthly March issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy from researchers in California focuses on the impact of a novel water method on scheduled unsedated colonoscopy in US veterans. Researchers in Texas looked at how the time interval between the completion of the last dose of bowel preparation and the start of colonoscopy predicts the quality of the bowel preparation in a study appearing in the March special issue. (2009-03-02)

Updated Barrett's Guideline aims to improve patient outcomes
The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has released its updated 'ASGE guideline on screening and surveillance of Barrett's esophagus,' published in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2019-09-05)

Photodynamic therapy is an alternative to removal of esophagus
Most people experience occasional heartburn. But when heartburn is severe or occurs frequently over an extended period of time, it is called Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease or GERD. Over time, untreated GERD damages the lining of the esophagus. As a result, one in 10 people with GERD develop Barrett's esophagus, a potentially dangerous change in the lining of the esophagus. (2006-04-05)

Endoscopic ultrasound highly accurate in evaluating ambiguous radiographic findings of the pancreas
Researchers from St. Louis University School of Medicine in Missouri report that EUS and EUS-FNA is 99.1 percent accurate in diagnosing pancreatic neoplasms (abnormal growths or tumors) in patients who were referred for endoscopic ultrasound because of CT and/or MRI reports of two common, though somewhat ambiguous findings -- enlargement of head of pancreas or dilation of the pancreatic duct. The study appears in the August issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2008-08-27)

A biomarker for diagnosing celiac disease in people on a gluten-free diet
Researchers at the UPV/EHU and the BioCruces-Bizkaia Institute of Healthcare Research (IIS) have recently published an article in the Human Molecular Genetics journal in which they report on the discovery of a biomarker that could enable celiac disease to be diagnosed in the blood of people on a gluten-free diet. The UPV/EHU has patented this discovery so that in the future it can be transferred to companies interested in marketing this new diagnostic system. (2019-06-05)

For malignant biliary obstruction, plastic stents may be cost-effective alternative
Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) with stent placement has been commonly used for patients with malignant biliary obstruction. In PBD, the placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stents may provide better patency duration and a lower incidence of cholangitis compared with plastic stents. But a new study in the November issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy suggests that plastic stents may provide similar outcomes at a potential cost savings. (2016-11-03)

Colorectal cancer screening should start at 45, new research shows
Scientists in France analyzed over 6,000 colonoscopies and found a 400 percent increase in the detection of neoplasia in patients aged between 45-49 in comparison to aged 40-44. The vast majority of colorectal cancer screening programs throughout Europe commence between the ages of 50 and 55, with some not beginning until the age of 60. (2017-10-29)

Artificial intelligence: Is this the future of early cancer detection?
Overall, 306 polyps were assessed real-time by using the AI-assisted system, providing a sensitivity of 94 percent, specificity of 79 percent, accuracy of 86 percent, and positive and negative predictive values of 79 percent and 93 percent respectively, in identifying neoplastic changes. (2017-10-29)

Bleeding during endoscopy: Do anti-inflammatories play a role?
Does an aspirin-a-day increase the risk of bleeding during invasive diagnostic procedure? This is an important concern for many patients who take these and other antiplatelet agents in an effort to reduce heart attacks or strokes. Researchers at the MUHC have shown that antiplatelet drugs do not contribute to post-endoscopic bleeding. Their findings are published in this month's issue of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. (2007-03-15)

Radiofrequency ablation is effective treatment for dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus
Interim results from a nationwide clinical trial led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researcher suggest that radiofrequency ablation is an effective treatment for dysplasia in people with Barrett's esophagus, a condition that can lead to deadly gastrointestinal cancer. (2008-05-19)

Money or altruism: What motivates people to donate their poop to medicine?
Appealing to a concern for others is the best way to recruit most people to donate their stool for medicine, while cash rewards may be an additional motivator for some potential donors, according to research scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. (2018-06-05)

Results of early endoscopic exam critical for assessment of Barrett's patients
A new study indicates that both high-grade abnormal cellular changes (dysplasia) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (a form of cancer) have increased in the last 25 years among people with a digestive condition known as Barrett's esophagus. The study report, Increasing prevalence of high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma on index endoscopy in Barrett's esophagus over the past 2 decades, is published in the February issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). (2019-02-14)

2015 Henry Ford Brain Tumor Symposium
The 2015 Henry Ford Brain Tumor Symposium takes place 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday, April 24 at the MGM Grand in Detroit. The symposium, entitled 'Focused Forward: New Thoughts on Brain Tumor Treatment,' is aimed at health care professionals who seek to learn about the latest developments in brain tumor treatments. (2015-04-13)

Bowel prep oral sodium phosphate equal to fasting before capsule endoscopy for obscure GI bleeding
According to a new study from researchers in France, bowel preparation with oral sodium phosphate for capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is no better at cleansing the small bowel than the standard method of preparation, which is an eight-hour fast before the procedure. The study appears in the June issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2008-06-18)

Listening to gut noises could improve diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome
Utilizing newly adapted artificial intelligence, researchers have developed an acoustic belt that offers a new way to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by listening to the noises in a patient's gut, according to research presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. (2018-06-05)

More patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis receiving liver transplants
Increasingly, liver transplant centers are changing a long-standing practice of delaying potentially life-saving liver transplantation for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis until after they stopped drinking alcohol for six months, according to a new study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. (2018-05-22)

Role of interventional inflammatory bowel disease in the era of biologic therapy
According to a new statement from a panel of national and international experts in gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other areas, interventional (or therapeutic) IBD endoscopy has an expanding role in the treatment of disease and of adverse events from surgery. (2019-02-14)

C-diff infection 4 times more likely to kill patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Clostridium difficile infection is four times more likely to kill patients with inflammatory bowel disease, suggests research published ahead of print in the journal Gut. C difficile is an important cause of diarrhea among inpatients, and the numbers of new cases of the infection have been steadily increasing in recent years. (2007-09-26)

Changing patient's position helps effectiveness of colonoscopy -- especially on one side
Having patients lie on their left side while the right side of their colon is being examined can result in more polyps being found, thus increasing the effectiveness of colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening, according to a study in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. (2015-09-10)

ASGE issues updated infection control guidelines for gastrointestinal endoscopy
The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has updated its infection control guidelines regarding gastrointestinal endoscopy. The guidelines note that endoscopy-related infections are a very rare event since the adoption of endoscope reprocessing guidelines. The ASGE infection control guidelines appear in the May issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the ASGE. (2008-05-13)

Alcohol consumption habits may threaten GI health
Many studies have evaluated the risks and benefits of alcohol intake, with some concentrating on potential benefits while others focus on the risks of abuse. According to new research presented at Digestive Disease Week® 2006 (DDW), the volume of alcohol ingested and how it is mixed with other beverages can affect the health of the gastrointestinal (GI) system. (2006-05-22)

An archaeological mystery in a half-ton lead coffin
In the ruins of a city that was once Rome's neighbor, archaeologists last summer found a 1,000-pound lead coffin. (2010-03-29)

Study examines interval colorectal cancer despite surveillance colonoscopy
Researchers studied the rate of interval colorectal cancer in patients participating in the Polyp Prevention Trial Continued Follow-up Study and found that nine cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed over 7,626 person-years of observation for an incidence rate of 1.2 per 1,000 person-years of observation. Of patients in whom colorectal cancer developed, 78 percent had a history of advanced adenoma. The majority of the cancers detected were early stage and therefore highly curable. (2010-01-06)

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