Popular Energy Drinks News and Current Events

Popular Energy Drinks News and Current Events, Energy Drinks News Articles.
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Beat the heat
University of Utah mechanical engineering associate professor Mathieu Francoeur has discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. This could lead to devices such as laptop computers and cellphones with much longer battery life and solar panels that are much more efficient at converting radiant heat to energy. (2019-07-10)

Low-level jets create winds of change for turbines
Global wind power capacity has increased more than fivefold over the past decade, leading to larger turbines, but low-level jets are one cause for concern. The effects of these strong, energetic wind flows depend on how high the wind flows are in relation to the turbines. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers considered three different scenarios in which the LLJs were above, below, and in the middle of the turbine rotors. (2021-02-23)

Big data studies scrutinize links between fatty liver disease and how cells make energy
Three recent studies investigate changes in mitochondria, the cell's energy producers, as fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses to steatohepatosis (NASH). The first two studies illuminate how mitochondrial energy production stutters and fails; the third describes how changes to the liver during disease progression affect the organ's use of nutrients to produce energy. (2018-09-14)

App that will extend your smartphone battery life
New research out of the University of Waterloo has found a novel method to extend the battery life of smartphones for up to an hour each day. (2018-08-15)

Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine
A frosty mug of beer or ruby-red glass of wine just wouldn't be the same if the liquid was murky or gritty. That's why producers of alcoholic beverages usually filter them. But in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that a material often used as a filter could be transferring heavy metals such as arsenic to beer and wine. They also found ways to possibly limit this contamination. (2019-02-20)

MIT engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air
A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere. (2019-10-25)

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Reducing sugar content in sugar-sweetened drinks by 40 percent over 5 years could prevent 1.5 million cases of overweight and obesity in the UK and 300,000 cases of diabetes
A new study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal suggests that reducing sugar content in sugar sweetened drinks (including fruit juices) in the UK by 40 percent over five years, without replacing them with any artificial sweeteners, could prevent 500,000 cases of overweight and 1 million cases of obesity, in turn preventing around 300,000 cases of type 2 diabetes, over two decades. The study is by Professor Graham MacGregor* and colleagues at Queen Mary University of London, UK. (2016-01-06)

Taxing sugar-sweetened beverages increase stigma for low-income groups, Aboriginal peoples
When considering taxing sugar-sweetened beverages in Canada, policy-makers should look at lessons learned from tobacco taxation, especially how taxation could increase inequalities and stigma, argues an analysis in CMAJ. (2018-03-19)

Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. His discovery gives hope to Parkinson's patients. This research was done in collaboration with colleagues from Northern Illinois University and will be published this evening on the website of the authoritative journal Science. (2012-05-11)

Consuming sugary drinks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in mid-childhood
Children between the ages of 7 and 9 may be at greater risk for developing asthma if they consumed high amounts of fructose in early childhood or their mothers drank a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages while pregnant, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2017-12-08)

Study confirms beauty is in the eye of the beer holder
University of Nebraska-Lincoln psychology researchers used eye-tracking technology to determine how alcohol influences when college-age will men drop their eyes from a woman's face to other parts of her anatomy. (2017-12-21)

The Lancet Public Health: UK soft drinks industry levy estimated to have significant health benefits, especially among children
The UK soft drinks industry levy, due to be introduced in April 2018, is estimated to have significant health benefits, especially among children, according to the first study to estimate its health impact, published in The Lancet Public Health. (2016-12-15)

Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. This has implications for improving radiotherapy for cancer and understanding the origin of life. (2020-02-05)

Digital marketing exposure increases energy drink usage among young adults
Energy drinks represent a new category of nonalcoholic beverage with global sales of over $50 billion. Containing caffeine as a main ingredient, energy drinks are a central part of partying and sporting culture. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that digital marketing of energy drinks was more persuasive with young adults than other marketing methods. (2018-10-05)

Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)

Mandatory nutrition policies may impact sugar consumption
Mandatory nutrition policies could be a valuable tool in helping high school students to lower their sugar intake, a University of Waterloo study has found. (2018-03-28)

Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two
Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression. (2018-02-12)

The fight against obesity: To tax or not to tax?
Preventing obesity has become a major health priority and food taxation has been suggested as a crucial measure in order to achieve this. The debate 'This house believes that the UK population trend in obesity cannot be reversed without food taxation' will be held at the SfE BES 2017, the annual conference of the Society for Endocrinology, in Harrogate. The debate explores whether food taxation is an indispensable strategy to correct obesity trends, or whether there should be other ways of approaching the problem. (2017-11-04)

Astronomers reveal evidence of dynamical dark energy
An international research team, including astronomers from the University of Portsmouth, has revealed evidence of dynamical dark energy. (2017-10-03)

Two better than one: USU chemists advance sustainable battery technology
Utah State University chemists describe design and synthesis of a pi-conjugation-extended viologen molecule as a novel, two-electron storage anolyte for neutral total organic aqueous redox flow batteries. (2018-03-16)

Which strategies help cut consumption of sugary beverages in young children?
An Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies reveals strategies that can successfully reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in young children. (2018-07-18)

To starve pancreatic tumors, researchers seek to block 'self-eating,' other fuel sources
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and their collaborators are reporting preclinical findings for a potential two-treatment strategy to block multiple mechanisms of cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in Chicago. The findings will be presented from 8 a.m. to noon on Wednesday. (2018-04-13)

The hidden health cost of that extra drink
Regularly drinking more than the recommended UK guidelines for alcohol could take years off your life, according to new research published today in the Lancet. Part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, the study shows that drinking more alcohol is associated with a higher risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and death. (2018-04-12)

New study changes our view on flying insects
For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. At this speed, they are the most efficient and consume the least amount of energy. Corresponding phenomena have previously been demonstrated in birds, but never among insects. (2017-09-29)

Research gives new ray of hope for solar fuel
The quest to develop the 'Holy Grail' of affordable, viable and environmentally-friendly fuels using sunlight has taken an exciting new twist. (2018-04-27)

Physics: Toward a practical nuclear pendulum
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) Munich have, for the first time, measured the lifetime of an excited state in the nucleus of an unstable element. This is a major step toward a nuclear clock that could keep even better time than today's best atomic timekeepers. (2017-01-27)

Researchers see significant reduction in fatal car crashes after increase in alcohol taxes
Increasing state alcohol taxes could prevent thousands of deaths a year from car crashes, say University of Florida Health researchers, who found alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes decreased after taxes on beer, wine and spirits went up in Illinois. (2015-03-31)

Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study (2019-07-12)

Carbon leads the way in clean energy
Groundbreaking research at Griffith University is leading the way in clean energy, with the use of carbon as a way to deliver energy using hydrogen. (2016-03-22)

New model considers an extra factor to improve our prediction of nuclear fission
A research group based in a number of countries (Japan, Malaysia, Ukraine, and Germany), led by Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), have proposed an improved model for predicting the generation of thermal energy from nuclear fission processes, by focusing on Uranium-236. This model can help improve efficiency in nuclear power generation. (2017-12-27)

Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons. A new solar cell design could raise the energy conversion efficiency to over 50 percent by absorbing the spectral components of longer wavelengths that are usually lost during transmission through the cell. These findings were published on April 6 in the online edition of Nature Communications. (2017-04-23)

Sleeve gastrectomy, common weight-loss surgery, lowers women's tolerance to alcohol
Women who have had gastric sleeve surgery to lose weight may want to consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks they consume post-surgery. A new study from a team of researchers at the University of Illinois found that after undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, women could be legally intoxicated after drinking half the number of drinks than women who did not have this surgery. (2017-11-20)

Developing roads that can generate power from passing traffic
Researchers are looking at advanced materials for roads and pavements that could generate electricity from passing traffic. Engineers from Lancaster University are working on smart materials such as 'piezolectric' ceramics that when embedded in road surfaces would be able to harvest and convert vehicle vibration into electrical energy. (2017-09-18)

New biofuel cell with energy storage
Researchers have developed a hybrid of a fuel cell and capacitor on a biocatalytic basis. With the aid of enzymatic processes, what's known as a biosupercapacitor efficiently generates and stores energy. The trick: the enzymes are embedded in a stable polymer gel, which can store a large amount of energy. The scientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Swedish Malmö University describe their development in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2016-11-15)

Nuclear energy programs do not increase likelihood of proliferation, Dartmouth study finds
Contrary to popular thought, nuclear proliferation is not more likely to occur among countries with nuclear energy programs, according to research published in International Security. In a historical analysis of the relationship between nuclear energy programs and proliferation from 1954 to 2000, the study finds that the link between the two has been overstated. (2017-11-06)

Renewable energy developments threaten biodiverse areas
More than 2000 renewable energy facilities are built in areas of environmental significance and threaten the natural habitats of plant and animal species across the globe. A University of Queensland research team mapped the location of solar, wind and hydropower facilities in wilderness, protected areas and key biodiversity areas. (2020-03-25)

Americans are spending more time at home, and it's saving a lot of energy
Researchers have identified a positive trade-off for the rise in online shopping, our consumption of streaming video, and employees working from home. Despite increasing the amount of residential energy demand, the decrease in travel and use of non-residential spaces was responsible for a net 1,700 trillion bTU in energy savings for the United States in 2012, 1.8 percent of the national total. The analysis is published Jan. 29 in the journal Joule. (2018-01-29)

Manure could heat your home
Farm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. (2018-03-08)

Mapping the energy transport mechanism of chalcogenide perovskite for solar energy use
Researchers from Lehigh University have, for the first time, revealed first-hand knowledge about the fundamental energy carrier properties of chalcogenide perovskite CaZrSe3, important for potential solar energy use. They have published their findings in NPJ Computational Materials. (2019-12-04)

Huge energy potential in open ocean wind farms in the North Atlantic
Because wind speeds are higher on average over ocean than over land, wind turbines in the open ocean could in theory intercept more than five times as much energy as wind turbines over land. This presents an enticing opportunity for generating renewable energy through wind turbines. But it was unknown whether the faster ocean winds could actually be converted to increased amounts of electricity. (2017-10-09)

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