Popular Enzyme News and Current Events

Popular Enzyme News and Current Events, Enzyme News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.' (2018-01-18)

Living components
Programmable structural dynamics successful for first time in self-organizing fiber structures (2019-07-22)

UC San Diego cancer scientists identify new drug target for multiple tumor types
A dysfunctional enzyme involved in building cancer cell membranes helps fuel tumor growth; when it's disabled or depleted in mouse models, tumors shrank significantly. (2019-07-11)

University of Minnesota research discovers inhibitor to reverse toxic DUX4 effects
New University of Minnesota Medical School research identifies an inhibitor that protects cells from toxic effects associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in cells and mice. (2019-09-11)

Tipping the scales
Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. In a first, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded in marking proteins with ubiquitin in a targeted manner, in test tubes as well as in living cells. The procedure opens the door to exploring the inner workings of this vital regulatory system. (2019-04-03)

Enzyme may get key role in drug design for breast cancer and brain condition
In recent years, researchers have focused on the enzyme TLK2 suspecting it of playing a main role in several diseases. A new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen now reveals that the enzyme displays lower levels of activity in intellectual disability and that it is possible to inhibit it in breast cancer, where it is overactive. The study thus suggests that the enzyme may be a target for potential therapies. (2018-06-29)

Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes. (2018-01-12)

New insight into enzyme evolution
How enzymes -- the biological proteins that act as catalysts and help complex reactions occur -- are 'tuned' to work at a particular temperature is described in new research from groups in New Zealand and the UK, including the University of Bristol. (2016-03-03)

Engineering a plastic-eating enzyme
Scientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems. (2018-04-16)

Nuclear protein causes neuroblastoma to become more aggressive
Aggressive forms of neuroblastoma contain a specific protein in their cells' nuclei that is not found in the nuclei of more benign forms of the cancer, and the discovery, made through research from the University of Rochester Medical Center, could lead to new forms of targeted therapy. (2016-10-06)

New 'promiscuous' enzyme helps turn plant waste into sustainable products
A new family of enzymes has been discovered which paves the way to convert plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics, chemicals, and fuels. (2018-06-27)

New health benefits discovered in berry pigment
Naturally occurring pigments in berries, also known as anthocyanins, increase the function of the sirtuin 6 enzyme in cancer cells, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The regulation of this enzyme could open up new avenues for cancer treatment. (2018-04-05)

Preclinical study of therapeutic strategy for Lafora disease shows promise
A team of scientists have designed and tested in mice a novel and promising therapeutic strategy for treating Lafora Disease (LD), a fatal form of childhood epilepsy. This new type of drug is a first-in-class therapy for LD and an example of precision medicine that has potential for treating other types of aggregate-based neurological diseases. (2019-07-25)

First discover the disorder and then find the patients
Biochemists of Bielefeld University have confirmed the cause of initially unclear symptoms of patients in Israel. Their studies reveal that the patients suffer from a disorder called 'MPS III-E'. It was discovered by the Bielefeld researchers in 2012. However, until now there were no known patients. (2018-01-05)

Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered
Roughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological production of methane. (2018-01-15)

Patients to skip the lab, get immediate results with new blood test technology
Engineers have developed a mobile version of the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), proving a cheap and easy way to obtain bloodwork and urinalysis without visiting a laboratory. (2018-03-26)

Researchers defy biology: Mice remain slim on burger diet
Our bodies are extremely efficient at storing fat from food into our fat tissue. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have managed to completely block the development of obesity. The researchers deleted an enzyme and made it impossible for mice to increase their amount of fat tissue, despite the mice eating an extremely fatty diet. They are hoping the findings will open new avenues for better treatment of obesity. (2018-05-03)

Bacterial mechanism converts nitrogen to greenhouse gas
Cornell University researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that helps convert nitrogen-based fertilizer into nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. (2016-12-06)

MGH team engineers anti-inflammatory antibodies that may treat autoimmune disease
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a way to engineer antibodies within an organism, converting autoantibodies that attack 'self' tissues into anti-inflammatory antibodies in animal models of two autoimmune diseases. (2017-12-21)

Development of an enzymatic cycling method using pyruvate kinase
Enzyme cycling is a sensitive assay method that exploits amplification techniques. We recently developed a novel enzymatic cycling method, which utilizes both the forward and reverse reactions of creatine kinase (CK), for the quantitative determination of creatine. (2018-03-16)

UPV/EHU researchers account for the complex symptoms of Angelman syndrome
A research group at the Faculty of Science and Technology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to reliably identify the changes in the proteins altered by the UBE3A enzyme, responsible for Angelman syndrome. This disease causes problems in intellectual and motor development, epilepsy, difficulties in communication, and very few hours of sleep. Funding provided by the Angelman Syndrome Association has been a key factor in being able to complete the research. (2018-04-19)

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (2017-11-10)

New regulator of liver metabolism discovered
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have identified an enzyme that has a major effect on glucose utilization in liver cells. The enzyme, retinol saturase, helps these cells adapt to variations in glucose levels. However, when glucose levels are consistently too high, retinol saturase appears to exert a damaging effect on cells. Results from this study have been published in the journal Nature Communications*. (2017-09-29)

How do plants protect themselves against sunburn?
To protect themselves against UV-B, which are highly harmful, plants have developed cellular tools to detect them and build biochemical defenses. A team of Swiss biologists discovered the existence of a UV-B receptor a few years ago. Today, these researchers demonstrate how these receptors, once activated by UV-B, associate with proteins that assist them to be assembled in the cell nucleus and to develop responses for survival and acclimation. (2016-07-11)

Cholera pathogen reveals how bacteria generate energy to live
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have discovered new details about how bacteria generate energy to live. In two recently published papers, the scientists add key specifics to the molecular mechanism behind the pathogen that causes cholera. The work could provide a better understanding of this pathogen, while also offering insight into how cells transform energy from the environment into the forms required to sustain life. (2007-01-29)

Study provides clues to prevent spread of ovarian cancer
A drug that blocks production of an enzyme that enables ovarian cancer to gain a foothold in a new site can slow the spread of the disease and prolong survival in mice, but only if the drug is given early in the disease process. (2008-03-13)

Scientists unearth secrets of Sir Alexander Fleming's medical breakthroughs
A century after Sir Alexander Fleming made two of the most important medical breakthroughs, scientists have unlocked the secret of how his discoveries may contribute to recurrent patient infections. (2018-02-15)

Protein research: The computer as microscope
Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. With high temporal and spatial resolution, they verified that a magnesium atom contributes significantly to switching the so-called G-proteins on and off. (2017-01-16)

Parasite study paves way for therapies to tackle deadly infections
New understanding of a parasite that causes a million cases of disease each year could point towards effective drug treatments. (2017-10-10)

Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrow
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell. (2018-01-11)

Hydrogen production: This is how green algae assemble their enzymes
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analyzed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. The enzyme, known as the hydrogenase, may be relevant for the biotechnological production of hydrogen. (2017-03-27)

Researchers shed new light on influenza detection
Notre Dame Researchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus. (2017-05-05)

Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?
Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together with researchers from the USA, have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule, helping to protect against oxidative stress. (2018-11-02)

A fat-regulating enzyme could hold the key to obesity, diabetes, cancer, other diseases
It had already been known that the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase plays a crucial role in regulating the amount of fat in the human body. Controlling it is therefore of interest in the fight against obesity. But scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have now found that getting rid of the enzyme entirely can increase the risk of cancer, inflammation and other ills. Their findings were published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry last month. (2017-09-18)

On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancer
CU Cancer Center study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer. (2017-08-23)

New 3-D printed polymer can convert methane to methanol
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists have combined biology and 3-D printing to create the first reactor that can continuously produce methanol from methane at room temperature and pressure. (2016-06-15)

An errant editing enzyme promotes tumor suppressor loss and leukemia propagation
UC San Diego researchers have found a stem cell enzyme copy edits more than 20 tumor types, providing new therapeutic target for preventing cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. (2019-01-03)

Eating insects might seem yucky, but they are nutritious and there is no reason you can't
Almost all living primates still have working versions of the gene needed to produce a stomach enzyme that breaks down exoskeletons. This means that the 'yuck' factor when it comes to eating insects has nothing to do with nutrition, digestion or evolution. (2018-01-24)

New technology for enzyme design
Scientists at the University of Würzburg have chemically modified the enzyme levansucrase using a new method. The enzyme can now produce sugar polymers that are exciting for applications in the food industry and medicine. (2018-06-01)

How corals adapt to day and night
Researchers have uncovered a gene in corals that responds to day/night cycles, which provides some tantalizing clues into how symbiotic corals work together with their plankton partners. (2008-09-12)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.