Popular Eons News and Current Events

Popular Eons News and Current Events, Eons News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 3 | 111 Results
Aging gracefully in the rainforest
In an article that appears in the current issue of Evolutionary Anthropology, researchers synthesize over 15 years of theoretical and empirical findings from long-term study of the Tsimane forager-farmers. In they find productivity and social status peak long after physical strength. (2017-05-09)

SwRI scientists introduce cosmochemical model for Pluto formation
Southwest Research Institute scientists integrated NASA's New Horizons discoveries with data from ESA's Rosetta mission to develop a new theory about how Pluto may have formed at the edge of our solar system. (2018-05-25)

Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)

UF botanists: Flowering plants evolved very quickly into 5 groups
University of Florida and University of Texas at Austin scientists have shed light on what Charles Darwin called the (2007-11-26)

Electrons take one step forward without two steps back
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have, for the first time, successfully used electric dipoles to completely suppress electron transfer in one direction while accelerating in the other. The discovery could aid development of improved solar cells and other energy-conversion devices and hasten the design of new and superb energy and electronic materials. (2018-06-08)

New hypothesis for origin of life proposed
Life may have begun in the protected spaces inside of layers of the mineral mica, in ancient oceans, according to a new hypothesis. (2007-12-04)

Evolutionary origins of animal biodiversity
A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has revealed the origins and evolution of animal body plans. (2018-09-03)

Rutgers-led research could revolutionize nuclear waste reprocessing and save money
Seeking a better way to capture radioactive iodides in spent nuclear reactor fuel, Rutgers-New Brunswick scientists have developed an extremely efficient 'molecular trap' that can be recycled and reused (2017-11-01)

Glaciers may have helped warm Earth
Weathering of Earth by glaciers may have warmed the planet over eons by aiding the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. A new study shows the cumulative effect may have created negative feedback that prevented runaway glaciation. (2017-07-31)

Narrowing the universe in the search for life
In the search for life on other planets, scientists traditionally have looked for a world with water. But an Ohio State geophysicist wonders if we should look to rocks instead. (2018-12-17)

Molecular machinery that makes potent antibiotic revealed after decades of research
Scientists at Rutgers and universities in Russia, Poland and England have solved a nearly 30-year mystery -- how the molecular machinery works in an enzyme that makes a potent antibiotic. The findings, which appear in the journal Molecular Cell, provide the tools to design new antibiotics, anticancer drugs and other therapeutics. (2019-01-17)

Clemson researchers say algae key to mass extinctionss
Geologist James W. Castle and ecotoxicologist John H. Rodgers have published findings that toxin producing algae were a deadly factor in mass extinctions millions of years ago. The research not only provides new insights into the past but also offers a caution about the future. (2009-10-19)

His or hers jealousy? Study offers new explanation for sex differences in jealousy
Research has documented that most men become much more jealous about sexual infidelity than they do about emotional infidelity. Women are the opposite, and this is true all over the world. (2010-01-26)

Study reveals potential evolutionary role for same-sex attraction
Male homosexuality doesn't make complete sense from an evolutionary point of view. One possible explanation is what evolutionary psychologists call the (2010-02-04)

New mineral classification system captures Earth's complex past
A system of categorization that reflects not just a mineral's chemistry and crystalline structure, but also the physical, chemical, or biological processes by which it formed, would be capable of recognizing that nanodiamonds from space are fundamentally different to diamonds formed in Earth's depths. (2019-06-03)

Ant reactions to habitat disruptions inform a result of evolution, according to Conco
Concordia University biology professor Jean-Philippe Lessard reviews the ant traits system developed by Alan Andersen and calls for the creation of a global framework to help categorize the world's ant population. (2019-06-04)

SwRI part of international team identifying primordial asteroids
Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was part of an international team that recently discovered a relatively unpopulated region of the main asteroid belt, where the few asteroids present are likely pristine relics from early in solar system history. The team used a new search technique that also identified the oldest known asteroid family, which extends throughout the inner region of the main asteroid belt. (2017-08-03)

Chimps caught crabbing
Kyoto University researchers report on chimpanzees in Guinea fishing and consuming freshwater crabs, something previously undiscovered. The paper describes how this is a potential clue in explaining how our primarily fruit-eating ancestors began eating aquatic life, and supplementing their diet with nutrients critical for brain development. (2019-05-29)

Chandra scores a double bonus with a distant quasar
Two discoveries from a distant quasar - an enormous X-ray jet and an X-ray shadow cast by an intervening galaxy - are giving astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory cause to be doubly excited. These two independent results reveal information about a supermassive black hole at the center of the quasar as well as the amount of oxygen in a distant galaxy billions of years ago. (2002-02-07)

Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses
The herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that commonly infects the mouth, is continuing to mix with the genital herpes virus (HSV-2) to create new, different recombinant versions. Genital co-infection with both viruses could create opportunities for the viruses to recombine. This ability of the viruses to recombine poses problems for vaccine development, due to the risk of a live vaccine for genital herpes mixing with HSV-1 to form an infectious recombinant. (2019-04-30)

Rutgers researchers identify the origins of metabolism
A Rutgers-led study sheds light on one of the most enduring mysteries of science: How did metabolism -- the process by which life powers itself by converting energy from food into movement and growth -- begin? To answer that question, the researchers reverse-engineered a primordial protein and inserted it into a living bacterium, where it successfully powered the cell's metabolism, growth and reproduction. (2019-07-01)

It's evolution: Nature of prejudice, aggression different for men and women
Prejudice against people from groups different than their own is linked to aggression for men and fear for women, suggests new research led by Michigan State University scholars. (2012-01-24)

New instrument has potential to detect water deep underground on Mars
With the whoosh of compressed gas and the whir of unspooling wire, a team of Boulder scientists and engineers tested a new instrument prototype that might be used to detect groundwater deep inside Mars. (2009-06-24)

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions
It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research led by the University of Texas at Austin links the lag to something different: evolution. (2019-04-08)

Sustained planetwide storms may have filled lakes, rivers on ancient mars
A new study from The University of Texas at Austin is helping scientists piece together the ancient climate of Mars by revealing how much rainfall and snowmelt filled its lake beds and river valleys 3.5 billion to 4 billion years ago. (2020-08-19)

Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record -- and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs from the past. (2021-01-14)

No new mountains formed during Earth's middle age, halting life's evolution for an eon
During the Proterozoic, Earth grew no taller - the tectonic processes that form mountains stalled, leaving continents devoid of high mountains for nearly 1 billion years, according to a new study. (2021-02-11)

High-speed method to aid search for solar energy storage catalysts
Writing this week in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the Wisconsin group describes a new high-throughput method to identify electrocatalysts for water oxidation. (2012-05-25)

Gene networks dictate plants' responses to cold, stress
Recent advances in technology have allowed scientists to probe the molecular nature of life, analyzing thousands of genes at a time and recognizing patterns of gene interaction. In a recent paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, complexity scientist Samuel Scarpino and co-authors explore gene co-expression networks that have evolved to help plants withstand drought and cold. (2017-06-28)

History-hunting geneticists can still follow familiar trail
Fresh analysis validates use of classic genetic system to study ancient migrations of people and to estimate the populations of people or animals as they existed tens of thousands of years ago. (2006-12-19)

Pressured by predators, lizards see rapid shift in natural selection
Countering the widespread view of evolution as a process played out over the course of eons, evolutionary biologists have shown that natural selection can turn on a dime -- within months -- as a population's needs change. In a study of island lizards exposed to a new predator, the scientists found that natural selection dramatically changed direction over a very short time, within a single generation, favoring first longer and then shorter hind legs. (2006-11-16)

A fertilizer dearth foiled animal evolution for eons?
Earth was inhospitable to complex life for billions of years, practically suffocating evolution in a nearly oxygen-free environment. Then came a shift in phosphorus concentrations to ocean shallows, and after that, the evolution of complex life exploded. (2016-12-21)

How does spatial multi-scaled chimera state produce the diversity of brain rhythms?
This work revealed that the real brain network has a new chimera state -- spatial multi-scaled chimera state, and its formation is closely related the local symmetry of connections. (2020-07-03)

Artistic space odyssey to broadcast people's messages to the stars
Messages from around the world are to be beamed into space at the speed of light as part of a cultural project to create a celestial time capsule. (2016-02-08)

A new, clearer insight into Earth's hidden crystals
Geologists have developed a new theory about the state of Earth billions of years ago after examining the very old rocks formed in the Earth's mantle below the continents. (2021-02-17)

Quasars illuminate swiftly swirling clouds around galaxies
A new study of light from quasars has provided astronomers with illuminating insights into the swirling clouds of gas that form stars and galaxies, proving that the clouds can shift and change much more quickly than previously thought. (2014-01-08)

Researchers call for rethinking efforts to prevent interplanetary contamination
Two university researchers say environmental restrictions have become unnecessarily restrictive and expensive -- on Mars. (2013-06-27)

Bering Land Bridge Conference In Colorado Slated For Sept. 20
Scores of scientists from around the world will be in Colorado Sept. 20 to Sept. 23 for a conference on the prehistoric environment of the Bering land bridge, believed to be the migration corridor for the earliest North Americans. (1997-09-12)

Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms. Additionally, the research will allow scientists to develop new tools to control populations of disease carrying insects and invasive species in a highly targeted fashion. (2020-09-08)

Want to petrify wood without waiting a few million years? Try this
Yongsoon Shin and colleagues at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have converted wood to mineral, achieving in days what it takes nature millions of years to do. (2005-01-24)

Page 1 of 3 | 111 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.