Nav: Home

Popular Erosion News and Current Events

Popular Erosion News and Current Events, Erosion News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 17 | 649 Results
New research indicates likely hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events. (2017-11-20)
Hidden impacts of sand extraction and trade
The increasing demand for sand in building infrastructure is prompting a range of environmental and social issues that must be addressed, Aurora Torres et al. stress in this Perspective, highlighting the role that science has in finding sustainable solutions. (2017-09-07)
Study finds climate plays role in decline of one of Asia's most critical water resources
Climate variability -- rather than the presence of a major dam -- is most likely the primary cause for a water supply decline in East Asia's largest floodplain lake system, according to a Kansas State University researcher. (2017-08-03)
Alcohol taxes are too low, have not kept up with inflation
State alcohol excise taxes are typically only a few cents per drink and have not kept pace with inflation, according to a new study in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2017-12-13)
A sustainable future powered by sea
OIST researchers develop turbines to convert the power of ocean waves into clean, renewable energy. (2017-09-22)
How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water
According to a new study, almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse. (2017-12-15)
Scientists find mechanisms to avoid telomere instability found in cancer and aging cells
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that a functional component of telomeres called TERRA has to constantly be kept in check to prevent telomeric and chromosomal instability, one of the underlying anomalies associated with cancer. (2018-01-22)
Study reveals significant role of dust in mountain ecosystems
University of Wyoming researchers led a study that found foreign dust likely fertilizes plants in many locations worldwide. (2017-12-06)
WSU researcher links salmon sex to geological change
It turns out that sex can move mountains. A Washington State University researcher has found that the mating habits of salmon can alter the profile of stream beds, affecting the evolution of an entire watershed. (2017-10-19)
Conventional plowing is 'skinning our agricultural fields'
Traditional plow-based agricultural methods and the need to feed a rapidly growing world population are combining to deplete the Earth's soil supply, a new study confirms. (2007-08-08)
Can hemp help the everglades?
Within Southern Florida, soil and water conditions indicate potential for leaching from the use of atrazine-based herbicides in corn crops. (2007-08-06)
Understanding alternative reasons for denying climate change could help bridge divide
An early look at ongoing work by a University of Kansas researcher examines alternative reasons for climate change denial, specifically economic, social or cultural influences on why individuals or entire communities remain skeptical of climate change. (2017-08-15)
Helping Chinese farmers tackle erosion, increase profits
On the steep farming slopes of China, Bozhi Wu and his research associates are finding ways to improve economic and environmental stability. (2017-09-13)
'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farming
Researchers at the University of York working on a 700-year-old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years. (2017-08-21)
Scientists develop tool which can predict coastal erosion and recovery in extreme storms
Coastal scientists at the University of Plymouth and University of New South Wales have developed a computerised model which goes some way to answering their subject's 'holy grail' -- how to use existing data to confidently forecast annual coastal erosion and accretion. (2017-10-11)
Scientist's work may provide answer to martian mountain mystery
By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. (2018-01-11)
Drink brewed tea to avoid tooth erosion
Mohamed A. Bassiouny, D.M.D., B.D.S, M.Sc., Ph.D., the lead author of a study published in the July/August issue of General Dentistry, compared green and black tea to soda and orange juice in terms of their short- and long-term erosive effect on human teeth. (2008-11-25)
New research improves understanding of ancient landscapes
Geologists use zircon mineral grains to reconstruct what the Earth and its landscapes looked like in ancient times. (2017-12-12)
Study identifies California cliffs at risk of collapse
A California Sea Grant-funded study provides the largest analysis of cliff erosion throughout the state and provides a new hazard index for determining which areas are at most risk. (2017-12-20)
UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover crops
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. (2018-02-05)
Ancient genes used to produce salt-tolerant wheat
Two recently discovered genes from an ancient wheat variety have led to a major advance in breeding new salt-tolerant varieties. (2007-02-01)
Blocking one receptor could halt rheumatoid arthritis
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown for the first time how the activation of a receptor provokes the inflammation and bone degradation of rheumatoid arthritis -- and that activation of this one receptor, found on cells in the fluid of arthritic joints, is all that is required. (2014-09-10)
NASA shows new Tongan island made of tuff stuff, likely to persist years
In late December 2014, a submarine volcano in the South Pacific Kingdom of Tonga erupted, sending a violent stream of steam, ash and rock into the air. (2017-12-11)
Healthy coastal wetlands would adapt to rising oceans
Tidal marshes, which nurture marine life and reduce storm damage along many coastlines, should be able to adjust to rising sea levels and avoid being inundated and lost, if their vegetation isn't damaged and their supplies of upstream sediment aren't reduced, a new Duke University study suggests. (2007-03-28)
The price paid for higher energy is highly dangerous to teeth
Previous scientific research findings have helped to warn consumers that the pH (potential of hydrogen) levels in beverages such as soda could lead to tooth erosion, the breakdown of tooth structure caused by the effect of acid on the teeth that leads to decay. (2008-03-12)
Salvaging the ecosystem after salvage logging
When a forest fire sweeps across timberlands, logging companies often follow to do salvage logging -- salvaging the timber that has not been completely destroyed. (2015-01-09)
New insights on the relationship between erosion and tectonics in the Himalayas
Can processes unfolding at the Earth's surface be strong enough to influence tectonics? (2016-08-23)
Sea level as a metronome of Earth's history
Sedimentary layers contain stratigraphic cycles and patterns that precisely reveal the succession of climatic and tectonic conditions that have occurred over millennia. (2017-05-19)
Could switchgrass help China's air quality?
Researchers from the United States and China have proposed an idea that could improve China's air quality, but they're not atmospheric scientists. (2017-09-05)
One in ten historic coastal landfill sites in England are at risk of erosion
There are at least 1,215 historic coastal landfill sites in England, mostly clustered around estuaries with major cities, including Liverpool, London, and Newcastle on Tyne. (2017-11-15)
Study shows eutrophic lakes may not recover for a millennium
Although it has taken just 60 years for humans to put many freshwater lakes on the eutrophication fast track, a new study shows their recovery may take a thousand years under the best of circumstances. (2005-06-13)
Multiple sites rich in water ice found on Mars
Erosion on Mars is exposing deposits of water ice, starting at depths as shallow as one to two meters below the surface and extending 100 meters or more. (2018-01-11)
East Greenland ice sheet has responded to climate change over the last 7.5 million
Using marine sediment cores containing isotopes of aluminum and beryllium, a group of international researchers has discovered that East Greenland experienced deep, ongoing glacial erosion over the past 7.5 million years. (2016-12-07)
Mountain ranges evolve and respond to Earth's climate, study shows
Groundbreaking new research has shown that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them. (2015-11-23)
NASA mission reveals speed of solar wind stripping Martian atmosphere
NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission has identified the process that appears to have played a key role in the transition of the Martian climate from an early, warm and wet environment that might have supported surface life to the cold, arid planet Mars is today. (2015-11-05)
Climigration? UNH expert explores threat of climate change on populations
Climigration refers to migration caused by climate change. The term was coined to describe the predicament of northern Alaska populations who live on the 'front line of climate change,' facing immediate threats from erosion and flooding. (2017-02-15)
More than 100 years of flooding and erosion in 1 event
Sara Rathburn of Colorado State University and colleagues have developed an integrated sediment, wood, and organic carbon budget for North St. (2017-03-27)
Climate change can goad volcanoes into life
Geologists from UNIGE, working with the University of Orléans, University Pierre and Marie Curie and the ICTJA-CSIC Institute analyzed volcanic data from the Messinian salinity crisis in the Mediterranean Sea, when the Strait of Gibraltar was blocked and the Mediterranean temporarily isolated from the Atlantic. (2017-09-25)
Investigating the impact of 'legacy sediments' on water quality
University of Delaware researcher Shreeram Inamdar has been awarded a $499,500 grant from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to determine if stream-bank legacy sediments are significant sources of nutrients to surface waters and how they may influence microbial processes and nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems. (2017-02-16)
Discovery reveals planet almost as hot as the Sun
An international team of scientists, including Justin R. Crepp, Freimann Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Notre Dame, say the planet is 2.8 times bigger than Jupiter and reaches temperatures over 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit (4,600 Kelvin) during the day. (2017-06-05)
Page 1 of 17 | 649 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Peering Deeper Into Space
The past few years have ushered in an explosion of new discoveries about our universe. This hour, TED speakers explore the implications of these advances — and the lingering mysteries of the cosmos. Guests include theoretical physicist Allan Adams, planetary scientist Sara Seager, and astrophysicists Natasha Hurley-Walker and Jedidah Isler.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#461 Adhesives
This week we're discussing glue from two very different times. We speak with Dr. Jianyu Li about his research into a new type of medical adhesive. And Dr. Geeske Langejans explains her work making and investigating Stone Age and Paleolithic glues.