Popular Erosion News and Current Events

Popular Erosion News and Current Events, Erosion News Articles.
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Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)

Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon release
As erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release. (2018-04-12)

Managing stormwater and stream restoration projects together
A unified approach may benefit water quality, environment more than piecemeal. (2019-10-02)

How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water
According to a new study, almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse. The study also offers ideas on how agriculture can change to become a part of the solution from being part of the problem. (2017-12-15)

UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover crops
A team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. They found that while cover crops can cut into profitability over the short term, there are a number of benefits over long-term adoption. (2018-02-05)

Flood risk denial in US coastal communities
Cultural anthropologist David Casagrande along with his colleagues are working to identify flood-prone locations, key individuals, and intervention strategies that lead to community-based mitigation in US coastal communities. He will present some of his findings at The annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology (SFAA) in Philadelphia next week in a session called 'Sustainable Futures of Chesapeake Communities Facing Relative Sea-level Rise.' (2018-04-02)

Conventional plowing is 'skinning our agricultural fields'
Traditional plow-based agricultural methods and the need to feed a rapidly growing world population are combining to deplete the Earth's soil supply, a new study confirms. (2007-08-08)

River shaping from floods happens in moderation
An assessment of rivers in the US suggests that although there is a relationship between increased flood size and erosion, the effect is most pronounced for moderate floods. (2016-05-05)

Chemical weathering controls erosion rates in rivers
Chemical weathering can control how susceptible bedrock in river beds is to erosion, according to new research. In addition to explaining how climate can influence landscape erosion rates, the results also may improve scientists' ability to interpret and predict feedbacks between erosion, plate tectonics and Earth's climate. The research, led by The University of Texas at Austin, was published in Nature on April 14, 2016. (2016-04-13)

Multiple sites rich in water ice found on Mars
Erosion on Mars is exposing deposits of water ice, starting at depths as shallow as one to two meters below the surface and extending 100 meters or more. (2018-01-11)

Scientists find mechanisms to avoid telomere instability found in cancer and aging cells
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that a functional component of telomeres called TERRA has to constantly be kept in check to prevent telomeric and chromosomal instability, one of the underlying anomalies associated with cancer. (2018-01-22)

Coral reefs protect coasts from severe storms
Coral reefs can naturally protect coasts from tropical cyclones by reducing the impact of large waves before they reach the shore, according to scientists. Tropical cyclones wreak havoc on coastal infrastructure, marine habitats and coastal populations across the world. However, Dr. Michael Cuttler, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the University of Western Australia, says that for coastlines facing a direct cyclone impact, a fringing reef can protect the beach from extensive erosion. (2018-04-02)

Scientist's work may provide answer to martian mountain mystery
By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. Dr. William Anderson, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, co-authored a paper published in the journal Physical Review E that explains the common Martian phenomenon of a mountain positioned downwind from the center of an ancient meteorite impact zone. (2018-01-11)

Adaptive management of soil conservation is essential to improving water quality
The quality of our rivers and lakes could be placed under pressure from harmful levels of soluble phosphorus, despite well-intended measures to reduce soil erosion and better manage and conserve farmland for crop production, a new study shows. The UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology led a team of international scientists, who found that increased levels of soluble phosphorus in rivers entering Lake Erie, in the USA, may be linked to conservation measures. (2017-01-13)

Seagrass saves beaches and money
Seagrass beds are so effective in protecting tropical beaches from erosion, that they can reduce the need for regular, expensive beach nourishments that are used now. In a recent article in the journal BioScience, biologists and engineers from the Netherlands and Mexico describe experiments and field observations around the Caribbean Sea. (2019-01-02)

Investigating the impact of 'legacy sediments' on water quality
University of Delaware researcher Shreeram Inamdar has been awarded a $499,500 grant from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to determine if stream-bank legacy sediments are significant sources of nutrients to surface waters and how they may influence microbial processes and nutrient cycling in aquatic ecosystems. (2017-02-16)

Deforestation, erosion exacerbate mercury spikes near Peruvian gold mining
Scientists from Duke University have developed a model that can predict the amount of mercury being released into a local ecosystem from deforestation. The research could point toward ways to mitigate the worst effects of mercury poisoning in regions already experiencing elevated mercury levels caused by small-scale gold mining practices, such as those in the Peruvian Amazon. (2019-12-12)

Blocking one receptor could halt rheumatoid arthritis
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown for the first time how the activation of a receptor provokes the inflammation and bone degradation of rheumatoid arthritis -- and that activation of this one receptor, found on cells in the fluid of arthritic joints, is all that is required. (2014-09-10)

New research indicates likely hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events. The findings indicate some of the likely implications should current trends of rising carbon dioxide and global warming continue. (2017-11-20)

Alcohol taxes are too low, have not kept up with inflation
State alcohol excise taxes are typically only a few cents per drink and have not kept pace with inflation, according to a new study in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. Raising those taxes, according to the authors, represents an opportunity for states to increase revenues while simultaneously improving public health outcomes and costs related to excessive alcohol consumption. (2017-12-13)

More than 100 years of flooding and erosion in 1 event
Sara Rathburn of Colorado State University and colleagues have developed an integrated sediment, wood, and organic carbon budget for North St. Vrain Creek in the semi-arid Colorado Front Range following an extreme flooding event in September of 2013. Erosion of more than 500,000 cubic meters, or up to ~115-years-worth of weathering products, occurred through landsliding and channel erosion during this event. (2017-03-27)

A sustainable future powered by sea
OIST researchers develop turbines to convert the power of ocean waves into clean, renewable energy. (2017-09-22)

What does global climate have to do with erosion rates?
Geoscientists have been intrigued by a potential link between erosion rates at the Earth's surface and changes in global climate. A new study now calls into question this link. A team of researchers re-examined 30 locations with reported accelerated erosion after the onset of glacial-interglacial cycles a few million years ago. In nearly all of the locations, the proposed link between erosion and global climate could not be confirmed. (2018-07-05)

Toothpaste alone does not prevent dental erosion or hypersensitivity
An analysis of nine toothpastes found that none of them protects enamel or prevents erosive wear. Specialists stress that diet and treatment by a dentist are key to avoid the problems originated by dentin exposure. (2018-03-13)

Can hemp help the everglades?
Within Southern Florida, soil and water conditions indicate potential for leaching from the use of atrazine-based herbicides in corn crops. Scientists conducted studies to evaluate the specific groundwater risk from atrazine use by focusing on sunn hemp which seems to have the potential to greatly reduce that risk. (2007-08-06)

Sea level as a metronome of Earth's history
Sedimentary layers contain stratigraphic cycles and patterns that precisely reveal the succession of climatic and tectonic conditions that have occurred over millennia. Researchers at UNIGE and UNIL have been working on an analytical method that combines observing deep-water sedimentary strata and measuring in them the isotopic ratio between heavy and light carbon. They have discovered that the cycles that punctuate these sedimentary successions are ascribable to sea level changes. (2017-05-19)

Worldwide loss of phosphorus due to soil erosion quantified for the first time
Phosphorus is essential for agriculture, yet this important plant nutrient is increasingly being lost from soils around the world. The primary cause is soil erosion, reports an international research team led by the University of Basel. The study in the journal Nature Communications shows which continents and regions are most strongly affected. (2020-09-11)

Stormy weather
Flooding isn't new to the Santa Barbara coastline. However, the inundation doesn't always come from the mountains as it did last month in Montecito. Back in 1861-2, a series of large storms washed beach sand more than a quarter mile inland into what today is the Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Although historical accounts document the inland flooding, little has been known about how those storms impacted a now heavily developed California coast. (2018-02-26)

Pasture management and riparian buffers reduce erosion
A 12-year study was completed in Arkansas watersheds. (2017-05-08)

The price paid for higher energy is highly dangerous to teeth
Previous scientific research findings have helped to warn consumers that the pH (potential of hydrogen) levels in beverages such as soda could lead to tooth erosion, the breakdown of tooth structure caused by the effect of acid on the teeth that leads to decay. However, the pH level of soft drinks isn't the only factor that causes dental erosion. A beverage's (2008-03-12)

Ancient genes used to produce salt-tolerant wheat
Two recently discovered genes from an ancient wheat variety have led to a major advance in breeding new salt-tolerant varieties. (2007-02-01)

Hidden impacts of sand extraction and trade
The increasing demand for sand in building infrastructure is prompting a range of environmental and social issues that must be addressed, Aurora Torres et al. stress in this Perspective, highlighting the role that science has in finding sustainable solutions. (2017-09-07)

Earth and moon pummeled by more asteroids since the age of dinosaurs, say scientists
The number of asteroids colliding with the Earth and moon has increased by up to three times over the past 290 million years, according to a major new study involving the University of Southampton. These findings, published in Science challenge our previous understanding of Earth's history. (2019-01-17)

Study finds climate plays role in decline of one of Asia's most critical water resources
Climate variability -- rather than the presence of a major dam -- is most likely the primary cause for a water supply decline in East Asia's largest floodplain lake system, according to a Kansas State University researcher. (2017-08-03)

East Greenland ice sheet has responded to climate change over the last 7.5 million
Using marine sediment cores containing isotopes of aluminum and beryllium, a group of international researchers has discovered that East Greenland experienced deep, ongoing glacial erosion over the past 7.5 million years. (2016-12-07)

'Treasure trove' of dinosaur footprints found in southern England
More than 85 well-preserved dinosaur footprints -- made by at least seven different species -- have been uncovered in East Sussex, representing the most diverse and detailed collection of these trace fossils from the Cretaceous Period found in the UK to date. (2018-12-17)

Large igneous provinces contribute to ups and downs in atmospheric carbon dioxide
Modelling the location of large igneous provinces for the past 400 million years shows that their eruptions and subsequent weathering modulate global climate. (2018-06-05)

River deep, mountain high -- new study reveals clues to lifecycle of worlds iconic mountains
Scientists have discovered the reasons behind the lifespan of some of the world's iconic mountain ranges. (2013-06-27)

What's driving erosion worldwide?
ETH Zurich researchers are reexamining the causes of soil erosion around the world -- and have found that countries themselves have a surprisingly strong influence on their soil. This country effect was previously undetected. (2019-12-03)

Drink brewed tea to avoid tooth erosion
Mohamed A. Bassiouny, D.M.D., B.D.S, M.Sc., Ph.D., the lead author of a study published in the July/August issue of General Dentistry, compared green and black tea to soda and orange juice in terms of their short- and long-term erosive effect on human teeth. The study found that the erosive effect of tea was similar to that of water, which has no erosive effect. (2008-11-25)

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