Popular Family Planning News and Current Events

Popular Family Planning News and Current Events, Family Planning News Articles.
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Impact of misunderstanding genetic tests for heart conditions
Patients who undergo genetic testing for inherited heart disease need to be better informed to know how to interpret the results and understand the impact the results will have on their life, a University of Sydney study has found. (2018-02-23)

Small Ontario municipalities least prepared to support aging adults
Small municipalities in Ontario are less likely than larger centres to be able to accommodate the needs of their aging populations, according to a report from the University of Waterloo. (2017-12-21)

Danish-American research presents new ways of developing treatment of chronic inflammation
Researchers from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus University in Denmark in collaboration with researchers from Colorado in the United States have found a new way to treat the inflammation involved in chronic diseases such as psoriasis, asthma and HIV. A group of transmitter substances (cytokines) in the immune system, the so-called IL-1 family, has been shown to play an important role in many of these diseases by regulating the body's immune responses. (2019-08-30)

Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutations
Individuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature. (2018-01-19)

New research on why GPs quit patient care
The research aimed to identify factors influencing GPs' decisions about whether or not to remain in direct patient care, and what might help to retain them in the role. Three reasons emerged: a sense that general practice based primary care was under-valued within the healthcare system; concerns regarding professional risk encountered in delivering care in an increasingly complex health environment; and finally, considerations about leaving or remaining in direct patient care and the options and choices that GPs felt were available to them. (2018-02-02)

Time between pregnancies may affect autism risk
Investigators have found a link between the amount of time between pregnancies and autism spectrum disorder in children. (2017-11-22)

Clean plates much more common when we eat at home
When people eat at home, there's typically not much left on their plates - and that means there's likely less going to landfills, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (2018-02-14)

Economic concerns drive sustainability in American cities and towns
While environmental issues are often cited as a major factor in cities and towns in pursuing sustainability, a new study shows that economic concerns can be just as important to local governments in adopting concrete sustainability plans. (2016-04-25)

Only-children more likely to be obese than children with siblings
Families with multiple children tend to make more healthy eating decisions than families with a single child. (2019-11-06)

Use of mobile devices at home can carry conflict to workplace, UTA study says
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher is part of a team of authors who have found that using a mobile device at home for work purposes has negative implications for the employee's work life and also their spouse. (2018-01-05)

Metabolism gives a boost to understanding plant and animal nutrient evolution
In the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and Evolution, authors Maurino, et. al., explore the evolution of a family of enzymes, called 2-hydroxy acid oxidase, or 2-HAOX, that break down fats in both plant and animals. Their results show how plants and animals have adapted differently to similar environmental conditions in order to meet their energy needs. (2014-02-14)

Study: Many parents of children with disabilities don't make care plans
Many parents of children with disabilities don't make advance care plans in the event of the parent's or other caretaker's death or disability, according to a new nationwide survey by special education professor Meghan Burke at the University of Illinois. (2018-02-09)

Financial education key to reducing student loan stress
It is estimated that a quarter of American adults currently have student loans to pay off, and most do not have the financial literacy to manage debt successfully. The average student in the Class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt. Graduates from the University of Missouri have an average debt of $21,884. (2018-10-26)

New findings concerning hereditary prostate cancer
For the first time ever, researchers have differentiated the risks of developing indolent or aggressive prostate cancer in men with a family history of the disease. Researchers from the Swedish universities of Lund, Uppsala and UmeƄ now present new and somewhat surprising results. (2016-07-11)

End-of-life decision-making for people with intellectual disabilities
There has been little research on end-of-life decision-making for the growing population of older Americans with intellectual disabilities. Through a series of interviews with five different emergency medical service agencies in upstate New York, UB researchers asked EMS providers specifically how pre-hospital orders shape what they do in the case of someone with an intellectual disability. (2017-10-06)

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families
The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others -- even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time. (2018-08-10)

Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. In contrast, obesity, alcohol abuse, and smoking show a negative association with the disease. Details are reported in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. (2015-09-29)

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, MU study finds
In a new study, researchers from the University of Missouri found that only 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, demonstrating a need for increased financial education for retirement. This study is among the first to examine the state of millennials' retirement savings. (2018-03-05)

Childhood aggression linked to deficits in executive function
Researchers find that primary school children with reduced cognitive skills for planning and self-restraint are more likely to show increased aggression in middle childhood. The study examined the relationship between aggression and executive function -- a measure of cognitive skills that allow a person to achieve goals by controlling their behavior. The results suggest that helping children to increase their executive function could reduce their aggression. (2018-03-15)

Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have almost double the rate of repeat pregnancy
Women with intellectual and developmental disabilities have nearly double the rate of having another baby within a year of delivering compared to women without such disabilities, according to a new study published in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Nutritional status in adolescent girls
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Smitha Malenahalli Chandrashekarappa et al. consider socio-demographic variables that might be contributing to malnutrition in the age group between 16-19 years (late adolescence). (2019-01-04)

New model identifies most efficient logistics for military operations
Military deployments to environments lacking basic infrastructure -- whether humanitarian missions or combat operations -- involve extensive logistical planning. As part of a research project for the US Army, researchers at North Carolina State University designed a model to help military leaders better account for logistical risk and uncertainty during operational planning and execution. (2019-07-25)

Missing atoms in a forgotten crystal bring luminescence
A perovskite crystal's powerful light-emitting capabilities could be due to missing atoms in its structure. (2017-10-10)

Primary care clinicians' willingness to care for transgender patients
A new survey finds that most family medicine and general internal medicine clinicians are willing to provide routine care for transgender patients. (2018-11-12)

Older adults with small social networks less likely to get cataract surgery
A new study by University of Michigan Kellogg Ey Center links familial relationships to the likelihood older adults will get needed cataract surgery -- a procedure with broad implications for health. (2018-03-09)

Crowded urban areas have fewer songbirds per person
People in crowded urban areas -- especially poor areas -- see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential 'nuisance' birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows. (2018-04-13)

Sunflower pollen protects bees from parasites
Solitary mason bees specializing on sunflower pollen were not attacked by a common brood-parasitic wasp, which lays eggs in the nests, where its larvae kill bee eggs and eat their pollen provisions. (2016-06-14)

Family dinners improve teens' eating habits no matter how well family functions, study finds
More frequent family dinners were associated with more healthful eating by adolescents and young adults, regardless of the level of family functioning in managing daily routines, communicating and connecting emotionally. This study used data from 2,728 teens and young adult living at home with their parents. Frequent family meals were associated with eating more fruits and vegetables and less fast food and takeout food for young people in both high-functioning and low-functioning families. (2018-11-21)

Older kids who abuse animals much more likely to have been abused themselves
Older children who abuse animals are two to three times as likely to have been abused themselves as kids that don't display this type of behavior, highlights a review of the available evidence published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2018-07-16)

Health surrogates for older adults often don't know their care preferences
When it comes to making health decisions for an older adult, what health surrogates don't know can be harmful, according to new research. While 75 percent of surrogates feel extremely confident in their knowledge of a loved one's preferences, only 21 percent of them actually know what the older patient would want in the event of a serious illness, the researchers said. (2018-11-26)

Eating together as a family helps children feel better, physically and mentally
Children who routinely eat their meals together with their family are more likely to experience long-term physical and mental health benefits, a new Canadian study shows. (2017-12-14)

Study estimates ADHD symptom persistence into adulthood
Sixty percent of children with ADHD in a recent study demonstrated persistence of symptoms into their mid-20s, and 41 percent had both symptoms and impairment as young adults. (2016-10-20)

Virtual reality technology transforming cardiovascular medicine
Rapid advancements in the field of virtual reality are leading to new developments in cardiovascular treatment and improved outcomes for patients, according to a review paper published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science. Extended reality applications in cardiac care include education and training, pre-procedural planning, visualization during a procedure and rehabilitation in post-stroke patients. (2018-06-25)

New index maps relationships between poverty and accessibility in Brazil
Poor transportation availability can result in poor access to health care and employment, hence reinforcing the cycle of poverty and concerning health outcomes such as low life expectancy and high child mortality in rural Brazil. (2019-12-02)

A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best
University of Illinois family studies researchers believed that if the attention restoration theory, which describes how interaction with natural environments can reduce mental fatigue and restore attention, worked for individuals it might also work for families to help facilitate more positive family interactions and family cohesion. They tested their theory by looking at sets of moms and daughters who were asked to take a walk together in nature and a walk in a mall. (2017-11-17)

Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationships
Warm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. In a study, adolescents who reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies tended to go on to have better relationship problem-solving skills and less-violent romantic relationships as young adults. (2018-04-27)

First of its kind study seeks to answer whether effects of 'abortion pill' can be reversed
Women who initiate medical abortion but opt to stop in the middle of treatment may be at risk for serious blood loss, a UC Davis Health study finds. Researchers found this is true even for women who use an experimental treatment that claims to 'reverse' the effects of the abortion pill. The study, published today in Obstetrics and Gynecology, provides important insights into the safety of using high doses of progesterone during early pregnancy to try to stop a medical abortion. (2019-12-05)

Can population policy lessen future climate impacts?
Population has been seemingly left out of climate change assessments, including by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2018-08-16)

Spillover effects of family and school stress linger in adolescents' daily lives
A study among 589 9th graders found that stress at home affects adolescents' school life and vice versa. When adolescents experienced family stress, their learning and attendance problems increased at school the following day. Conversely, attendance and learning problems increased family stress the following day. These (2008-05-15)

Family members without inherited mutation have increased risk of melanoma
In families who carry certain inherited mutations that increase the risk for melanoma, members who do not carry the mutation also have an increased risk of melanoma, a study from Karolinska Institutet published in Genetics in Medicine reports. The phenomenon, which is called phenocopy, could result from other shared risk-enhancing genes or environmental factors within the families. (2017-12-08)

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