Popular Farmers News and Current Events

Popular Farmers News and Current Events, Farmers News Articles.
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Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. It influences, among other things, how animals interact, where they roam and the amount of energy they expend to maintain their access to food. But how do different members of ecologically similar species manage to live close to each other? (2019-01-22)

Big data for little creatures
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers at UC Riverside has received $3 million from the National Science Foundation Research Traineeship program to prepare the next generation of scientists and engineers who will learn how to exploit the power of big data to understand insects. The program, the first of its kind worldwide, will serve as a replicable education and training model for other institutions with an interest in developing computational entomology programs. (2016-10-10)

Wait-and-see strategy pays off, incentives needed for risk takers
Some people are quick to purchase the latest technology or sign up for a new service. Others adopt a wait-and-see strategy. A recent study by University of Illinois economist Hope Michelson, finds this is true for farmers in Nicaragua who enter into contracts with Walmart. (2017-09-18)

Rural dementia -- we need to talk
Research carried out by Plymouth University into the experience of dementia in farming and farming families, and its impact on their businesses and home lives, has identified four areas of concern which need to be addressed if dementia in the countryside is to be managed. It is the first time that research has addressed this issue in farming. (2017-01-11)

Ragweed casts shade on soy production
Ragweed, its pollen potent to allergy sufferers, might be more than a source of sneezes. In the Midwest, the plant may pose a threat to soybean production. Scientists have found that ragweed can drastically reduce soybean yield. (2018-03-28)

Protein in, ammonia out
A recent study has compiled and analyzed data from 25 previous studies. Researchers honed in on factors that influence how much ammonia dairy barns emit. (2016-06-29)

Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
In the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. The cold winters and other factors can lead to losses for farmers and forage shortages. Researchers have identified annual forage crops that can be cultivated in fields with winter-killed or terminated alfalfa. (2018-01-03)

Agricultural science helping farmers reduce greenhouse gas
With greenhouse gas reduction increasingly on the public agenda, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers say agricultural science may be part of the solution. (2002-12-17)

Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across China
An effort to improve crop yields and reduce fertilizer use applied top-down and bottom-up approaches to reach 20 million smallholder farmers across China. (2018-03-09)

Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators
A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. (2017-12-20)

Different outdoor professions carry different risks for skin cancer
One of the main risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common cancer worldwide, is solar ultraviolet radiation. (2018-06-06)

Treating women subsistence farmers for intestinal worms improved fitness and could boost food production
A new study in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) found that treating women subsistence farmers with just a single dose of a cheap deworming medication significantly improved their physical stamina for the grueling agriculture work needed for their family's survival. The results of treatment could be twofold: improved health for farming women and increased food production by women who have the stamina to farm more efficiently. (2018-04-02)

Research shows drones could help crop management take off
Initial results of an ongoing study show that aerial imagery produced by multi-spectral sensors as well as less-expensive digital cameras may improve accuracy and efficiency of plant stand assessment in cotton. (2017-11-17)

Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third, say dairy farmers
Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Those questioned also think that over the next five years they could cut their own antibiotic use by almost one-third in dry cow therapy and one-fifth in clinical mastitis. (2016-10-06)

Precision agriculture for small-scale farming systems
Working closely with farmers to use the right input, at the right time, at the right place, and in the right amount can improve crop yields. (2013-10-08)

Farming, cheese, chewing changed human skull shape
The advent of farming, especially dairy products, had a small but significant effect on the shape of human skulls, according to a recently published study from anthropologists at UC Davis. (2017-08-24)

Caught on camera: Amazonian crop raiders
Caught on camera in the jungle, a striking set of photos from the University of East Anglia (UK) reveal the secret lives of Amazonian crop-raiding animals. Researchers spent a year working with 47 Amazonian communities in the Juruá region of Amazonas, Brazil. They set up 132 motion-activated camera traps and took over 61,000 photos that reveal the Amazon's 'worst offending' crop destroyers. (2018-03-01)

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
Harvard Medical School researchers lead the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia (2018-05-17)

As climate is warming up, more bird nests are destroyed in Finnish farmland
A new study shows that birds have shifted the time of their breeding much faster than the farmers are anticipating their sowing times in Finnish farmland. This means that more birds are nowadays laying their eggs on fields that are still to be sown, a mismatch in timing that is most likely fatal for the bird nests. (2018-01-11)

Global scientific review reveals effective alternatives to neonicotinoid and fipronil insecticides
Use of controversial neonicotinoid insecticides ('neonics') in agriculture is not as effective as once thought, and can be replaced by advantageous pest-management alternatives, according to a study published today in the Springer journal Environmental Science and Pollution Research. (2018-02-26)

Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked crops
Richard Sowers, a professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a team of students have developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand. (2018-03-13)

Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (2018-01-22)

Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomes
An international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, analyzed ancient human genomes from 38 northern Europeans dating from approximately 7,500 to 500 BCE. The study, published today in Nature Communications, found that Scandinavia was initially settled via a southern and a northern route and that the arrival of agriculture in northern Europe was facilitated by movements of farmers and pastoralists into the region. (2018-01-30)

Beneficial effects of no-till farming depend upon future climate change
By storing carbon in their fields through no-till farming practice, farmers can help countries meet targeted reductions in atmospheric carbon dioxide and reduce the harmful effects of global warming. However, researchers say, the amount of carbon stored in soils depends on how the climate changes and how much carbon dioxide is in the atmosphere. (2005-10-13)

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (2018-06-04)

Strawberry fields ripe for the picking
A team of researchers from the University of Maryland, Utah State University, and the US Department of Agriculture compared three different strawberry production systems over a two-year period (2003-2004) to determine which system was preferred by consumers who frequented pick-your-own farms. (2007-12-06)

The new bioenergy research center: building on ten years of success
The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently embarked on a new mission: to develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum. (2018-02-18)

Research in olive varieties steps up the fight against anthracnose
A study by researchers at the University of Córdoba has identified the olive varieties most resistant to an epidemic which could ruin the year's harvest. (2018-02-01)

Save the bees? There's an app for that
A new mobile app can calculate the crop productivity and pollination benefits of supporting endangered bees. (2017-02-19)

Cover crops in nitrogen's circle of life
A circle of life-and nitrogen-is playing out in farms across the United States. And researchers are trying to get the timing right. The goal is to time nutrient release from cover crops to better match the nutrient needs of specific cash crops. (2018-02-14)

High-protein rice brings value, nutrition
A new advanced line of rice, with higher yield, is ready for final field testing prior to release. On average, it has a protein content of 10.6 percent, a 53 percent increase from its original protein content. It also needs less heat, time, and usually less water to cook. (2019-01-23)

Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku
For the first time, researchers unveil the genome of ito-mozuku (Nemacystus decipiens), the popular Japanese brown seaweed, providing data that could help farmers better grow the health food. (2019-03-14)

Farm sunshine, not cancer: Replacing tobacco fields with solar arrays
Michigan Tech researchers contend that tobacco farmers could increase profits by converting their land to solar farms, which in turn provides renewable energy generation. (2018-02-05)

Fixing soybean's need for nitrogen
To make protein, soybean plants need a lot of nitrogen.Beneficial bacteria in root nodules typically assist. A new study shows it's possible to increase the number of soybean root nodules--and the bacteria that live there--to further increase crop yields. This could remove the need to apply additional nitrogen fertilizers. (2018-03-21)

Sowing strips of flowering plants has limited effect on pollination
Many pollinating insects benefit from a small-scale agricultural landscape with pastures, meadows and other unploughed environments. In landscapes dominated by arable land, they lack both food and nesting places. Sown flower strips can increase the availability of food for pollinating insects, and are therefore assumed to benefit pollination. However, new research from Lund University in Sweden shows that the effect of the sown flower strips on pollination is limited and cannot compensate for the advantages of a varied landscape. (2018-04-06)

Archaeologists trace early irrigation farming in ancient Yemen
In Yemen, new evidence of ancient transitions from hunting and herding to irrigation agriculture have been found. (2008-07-16)

Houseplants could one day monitor home health
In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, a team of University of Tennessee faculty and a student from two unrelated disciplines -- plant sciences and architectural design -- explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. Their idea is to genetically engineer house plants to serve as subtle alarms that something is amiss in our home and office environments. (2018-07-20)

Weeds out of control
Herbicides can no longer control the weeds that threaten crop productivity and food security in the UK because the plants have evolved resistance, and future control must depend on management strategies that reduce reliance on chemicals. So concludes a nationwide epidemiological assessment of the factors that are driving the abundance and spread of the major agricultural weed, black-grass. (2018-02-12)

Birds and beans: Study shows best coffee for bird diversity
It's an age-old debate for coffee lovers. Which is better: Arabica beans with their sweeter, softer taste, or the bold, deep flavor of Robusta beans? A new study by WCS, Princeton University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison appearing in the journal Scientific Reports has taken the question to unlikely coffee aficionados: birds. (2018-02-16)

High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weed
In sub-Saharan Africa, 20 to 80% of corn yields may be lost because of a semi-parasitic plant, Striga. In areas infested with Striga, farmers may even lose their entire crops. In a new study, researchers from southern Africa identified several varieties of corn resistant or tolerant to Striga. Importantly, these varieties also have improved nutritional content, particularly protein. (2018-06-13)

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