Popular Fear News and Current Events

Popular Fear News and Current Events, Fear News Articles.
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Nonconscious brain modulation to remove fears, increase confidence
Machine learning-based training of brain activity has led to exciting developments: reduce fears, change one's preferences, or even increase one's confidence. Unfortunately, data to better understand the mechanisms of brain self-regulation remain scarce. A group of researchers from Japan, the US and Canada have joined forces to release the largest existing dataset of the sort. (2021-02-23)

Should our biggest climate change fear be fear itself?
From apocalyptic forecasting to estimates of mass extinctions, climate change is a topic which is filled with fearful predictions for the future. In his latest research, published in WIREs Climate Change, historian Matthias Dorries examines the cultural significance of fear and how it became a central presence in current debates over climate change. (2010-11-05)

What your TV habits may say about your fear of crime
When it comes to prime-time crime shows, do you like dramas like (2011-02-07)

The immune system may explain skepticism towards immigrants
There is a strong correlation between our fear of infection and our skepticism towards immigrants. New cross-national research from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University explains why political discussions of immigration are so heated and why integration often fails. (2017-05-01)

The fear of losing control and its role in anxiety disorders
Did you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New Concordia research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behavior, including checking. (2017-12-13)

How to deal with embarrassing situations
Feelings of embarrassment can be overcome through mental training. This is the finding of a study published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. By training your mind to be an observer rather than actively participating in the embarrassing situation it is possible overcome humiliating or distressing feelings, says Li Jiang of Carnegie Mellon University in the US who led the study. (2018-03-27)

Pain, pain go away: new tools improve students' experience of school-based vaccines
Researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) have teamed up with educators, public health practitioners and grade seven students in Ontario to develop and implement a new approach to delivering school-based vaccines that improves student experience. Findings were published as a collection of studies in a special open source edition of Paediatrics & Child Health, the official journal of the Canadian Paediatric Society. (2019-03-29)

Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs
The emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2018-01-11)

We read emotions based on how the eye sees
We use others' eyes -- whether they're widened or narrowed -- to infer emotional states, and the inferences we make align with the optical function of those expressions, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research reveals, for example, that people consistently associate narrowed eyes -- which can enhance visual discrimination -- with discrimination-related emotions including disgust and suspicion. (2017-02-22)

New study of the memory through optogenetics
A collaboration between Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Harvard University pioneers the increase of memory using optogenetics in mice in Spain. The study was based on light stimulation of a group of neurons, named Tac2, in the cerebral amygdala. These neurons play a key role in the memory of fear. Treated mice increased their long-term memory. This is the first time in the world that Tac2 has been stimulated by optogenetics. (2016-06-01)

How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie. The finding could lead to new recommendations about when and how often certain therapies are deployed for the treatment of anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-01)

People with Huntington's want more openness around assisted dying
Research has shown that better communication around assisted dying is needed between clinician and patients diagnosed with Huntington's disease. This is the first study in the UK (where assisted dying is illegal) into the attitudes of people with the condition, which usually leads to dementia and inability to coordinate movement. Because it is inherited, people with a diagnosis will often have witnessed the suffering of a parent. (2017-12-07)

Penn study links heart rate to gender gap in criminal offending
A new study from the University of Pennsylvania published in the journal Criminology, addresses the incomplete understanding of why males are more criminal than females by examining gender differences in biological functioning and behavior. It is the first study to demonstrate that men's lower resting heart rate partly explains the higher rate of criminal offending. (2017-05-31)

Aversion to holes driven by disgust, not fear, study finds
Clusters of holes may be evolutionarily indicative of contamination and disease -- visual cues for rotten or moldy food or skin marred by an infection. (2018-01-04)

New study advances treatment options for PTSD
Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-11)

Decoding the chemistry of fear
A Salk team charts the pathway for fear in worms to reveal more about human anxiety. (2018-03-19)

Fear and hoping: Adding hope to health messages may motivate better behaviors
While fear about health concerns may grip people, adding a little hope to a message might make people more willing to take preventative actions, according to researchers. (2018-02-23)

2016 Brexit/Trump election results driven by fear and loathing
In 2016 voters in the US and the UK defied expert predictions with the Vote Leave campaign winning for the UK to leave the European Union (Brexit) and the election of President Donald Trump. A world-first QUT-led study reveals why and how fear may now be driving the global political landscape. (2018-03-09)

The robots will see you now
Researchers tapped advances in real-time tracking software and robotics to design and test the first closed-loop control system featuring a bioinspired robotic replica interacting in three dimensions with live zebrafish. The system allows the robotic replica to both 'see' and mimic the behavior of live zebrafish in real time. Robots previously have been deployed alongside live animals to better understand animal behavior but the encounters were unidirectional. (2018-02-07)

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (2018-06-01)

Can a novel high-density EEG approach disentangle the differences of visual event related potential (N170), elicited by negative facial stimuli, in people with subjective cognitive impairment?
Thessaloniki- Macedonia, Greece -- Sept. 14, 2018 -- Greek researchers investigated whether specific brain regions, which have been found to be highly activated after negative facial stimulus, are also activated in different groups of people with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) compared to healthy controls (HC). (2018-09-14)

People will desire something even more if you increase their focus on it
The relationship between desire and attention was long thought to only work in one direction: When a person desires something, they focus their attention on it. (2017-11-13)

Food insecurity screening works, but social stigma stands in its way
Screening for food insecurity is effective, a Drexel study found, but red tape and fears of being declared unfit parents often keep help from coming. (2018-02-27)

Brain circuit helps us learn by watching others
MIT researchers have identified a brain circuit required to learn by watching others. This circuit, which is distinct from the brain network used to learn from firsthand experiences, relies on input from a part of the brain responsible for interpreting social cues. (2018-05-03)

Fear of sharks influences seaweed growth on Fijian coral reefs
Fishes' fear of sharks helps shape shallow reef habitats in the Pacific, according to new research by a scientist at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. The study is the first clear case of sharks altering a coral reef ecosystem through an indirect effect - creating an atmosphere of fear that shifts where herbivores feed and seaweeds grow. (2017-11-27)

Regional levels of fear associated with Trump and Brexit votes, psychology study shows
Unlike previous elections, fear and worry played a heavy hand in both the 2016 Donald Trump and Brexit elections, changing the script on how personality shapes political behavior, according to an international psychological study on voting behavior. (2018-03-08)

Men who sexually harass subordinates fear being judged as incompetent
The numerous high-profile men who have recently been accused of sexual harassment may not have been simply exercising their power. Instead their behavior could be related to feeling insecure and believing that others find them ill-suited to or undeserving of their dominant position. This is according to new research in Springer's journal Sex Roles, which was led by Leah Halper of Ohio University and The Ohio State University, and Kimberly Rios, also of Ohio University in the US. (2018-07-11)

UK needs to redesign health policies for men
While lots of attention has been given to women's increasing presence in the labor market, there has been less focus on male workers. By studying recent evidence through a 'male lens', this report calls on Government to commission more 'gendered' research to understand the different ways men and women engage with health services, arguing that work should be recognized as a health outcome due to the impact employment has on mental and physical health. (2018-11-18)

Dogs with noise sensitivity should be routinely assessed for pain by vets
Dogs which show fear or anxiety when faced with loud or sudden noises should be routinely assessed for pain by veterinarians, according to new research from the UK and Brazil. Researchers believe that pain, which could be undiagnosed, could be exacerbated when a noise makes the dogs tense up or 'start', putting extra stress on muscles or joints which are already inflamed leading to an associated with a loud or startling noise. (2018-03-20)

Genetic Non-Discrimination Act challenge from Quebec may open doors to genetic discrimination
If Canada's Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (GNA) is overturned by a challenge from the Province of Quebec, it will open the doors to genetic discrimination, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-05-14)

Synapse-specific plasticity governs the identity of overlapping memory traces
Each memory is stored in a specific population of neurons called engram cells. When a memory is linked with another to generate an associative memory, two memory traces overlap. At the same time, individual memories maintain their own identities. Using two overlapping fear memories in mice, researchers show that synapse-specific plasticity guarantees both storage and identity of individual memories. They also show that memory traces no longer exist in the brain after complete retrograde amnesia. (2018-07-13)

Manipulating brain activity to boost confidence
Is it possible to directly boost one's own confidence by directly training the brain? Researchers have discovered a way to implicitly amplify confidence in the brain by combining the use of artificial intelligence and brain imaging technology. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to important applications in clinical, medical and social settings. (2016-12-15)

New research suggests how parents protect children from the long-term effects of stress
When young children experience violence or poverty, the effect can last well into adulthood. But new research from the Emory School of Medicine suggests that a strong parental relationship could override some of these effects, by changing how children perceive the environmental cues that help them distinguish between what's safe or dangerous. (2018-12-13)

Fighting terror online
Online terrorism is the use of new technology to elicit fear and panic in society. This new book, Fighting Terror Online, focuses on how different societies react to this new form of terrorism and the ethics behind these responses. In Fighting Terror Online, Prof. Martin Golumbic asks the burning question, (2008-03-19)

Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.
George Mason University researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine. (2018-03-12)

Imagining sounds is just as good as hearing them for removing negative associations
Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Colorado, Boulder, have found that imagining a sound can be just as effective in breaking an association between that sound and a negative experience as hearing the sound in real life. The findings, publishing Nov. 21 in the journal Neuron, help to explain why imagination, already widely used as a therapy tool, can help with anxiety disorders. (2018-11-21)

PTSD symptoms may be prevented with ketamine
Columbia University researchers have evidence that giving a small dose of ketamine one week before a psychologically traumatic event may help prevent PTSD. The study, in mice, may have implications for soldiers who are at risk for trauma and PTSD. (2017-02-08)

Neuroticism could be 'sleeper effect' in Trump and Brexit campaigns
Regions where voters have more neurotic personality traits were more likely to vote for Donald Trump in the United States or for the Brexit campaign in the United Kingdom, revealing a new trend that could help explain the rise of fearmongering populist political campaigns across the world, according to new research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (2018-03-08)

Progress in posttraumatic stress disorder --Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatment
Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-05-09)

Blindness from smoking terrifies teens, but few realize the two are linked
Teenagers fear blindness more than lung cancer or stroke, but nine out of 10 don't know that smoking can rob them of their sight in later life, reveals research published ahead of print in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. The findings are based on the responses of 260 clubbers aged between 16 and 18, collected at four UK venues in Bournemouth, Winchester, Manchester and Southampton. (2007-02-05)

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