Popular Feathers News and Current Events

Popular Feathers News and Current Events, Feathers News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 13 | 513 Results
Female mammals follow their noses to the right mates
Historically, most examples of female mate choice and its evolutionary consequences are found in birds. But that doesn't mean mammals aren't just as choosy, researchers say. It just means that mammal mate preferences may be harder to spot. (2009-03-17)

Jurassic pain: Giant 'flea-like' insects plagued dinosaurs 165 million years ago
It takes a gutsy insect to sneak up on a huge dinosaur while it sleeps, crawl onto its soft underbelly and give it a bite that might have felt like a needle going in -- but giant (2012-05-01)

Researchers describe first-ever hybrid bird species from the Amazon
A team of U of T Scarborough researchers have described the first known hybrid bird species to be found in the Amazon rainforest. Through a series of genetic and other tests the team have revealed that the golden-crowned manakin -- first discovered in Brazil in 1957 but not seen again until 2002 - is in fact a hybrid species. (2017-12-25)

How the pufferfish got its wacky spines
Pufferfish are known for their strange and extreme skin ornaments, but how they came to possess the spiky skin structures known as spines has largely remained a mystery. Now, researchers have identified the genes responsible for the evolution and development of pufferfish spines in a study publishing July 25 in the journal iScience. Turns out, the process is pretty similar to how other vertebrates get their hair or feathers. (2019-07-25)

How boundaries become bridges in evolution
The mechanisms that make organisms locally fit and those responsible for change are distinct and occur sequentially in evolution. (2020-08-10)

Snacking snakes act as 'ecosystem engineers' in seed dispersal
Despite the bad rap snakes often get, they are more central to ecology than most people realize. New research reveals that snakes might even play a key role in dispersing plant seeds. (2018-02-08)

Even modest oil exposure can harm coastal and marine birds
Many birds and other wildlife die following an oil spill, but there are also other potential long-terms effects of oil exposure on animals. (2017-10-12)

Ornithologists announce discovery of new bird species
The announcement of the discovery of a new bird comes with a twist: It's a white-eye, but its eye isn't white. Still, what this new bird lacks in literal qualities it makes up for as one of the surprises that nature still has tucked away in little-explored corners of the world. Ornithologists, including one from Michigan State University, describe for science a new species of bird from the Togian Islands of Indonesia -- Zosterops somadikartai, or Togian white-eye. (2008-03-13)

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system
A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development. (2019-04-18)

Majority of Anna's hummingbirds may have feather mites on their tail feathers
The majority of Californian Anna's Hummingbirds appear to have P. huitzilopochtlii feather mites on their tail flight feathers, according to a study published Feb. 14, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Youki Yamasaki from Washington State University, US, and colleagues. (2018-02-14)

What dinosaurs' color patterns say about their lives
After reconstructing the color patterns of a well-preserved dinosaur from China, researchers have found that the long-lost species called Psittacosaurus was light on its underside and darker on top. This color pattern, known as countershading, is a common form of camouflage in modern animals. The findings reported in Current Biology on Sept. 15 lead the researchers to conclude that Psittacosaurus most likely lived in an environment with diffuse light, such as in a forest. (2016-09-15)

False feathers
Academic plagiarism is nothing new, and it most certainly did not begin with the advent of the Internet. Teachers have been struggling for decades in countries all over the globe to find appropriate methods for dealing with the problem. How do we teach good scientific practice? How do we find and document plagiarism? And how do we deal with those who have been caught? (2014-03-27)

Bumblebees confused by iridescent colors
A new study published today by the University of Bristol shows for the first time that dazzling iridescent colors in animals can act as camouflage. (2018-05-25)

The color of birds
New research provides insight into plumage evolution. (2016-11-03)

How yellow and blue make green in parrots
Many brightly colored birds get their pigments from the foods that they eat, but that's not true of parrots. Now, researchers reporting a study of familiar pet store parakeets -- also known as budgies -- have new evidence to explain how the birds produce their characteristic yellow, blue, and green feathers.The findings reported in the journal Cell on Oct. 5 promise to add an important dimension to evolutionary studies of parrots, the researchers say. (2017-10-05)

As hummingbirds dive, twisting tail feathers direct sound at potential mates
Rather than singing to their mates, Costa's hummingbird males court females with musical, high-speed dives. Their 'song' is produced as the wind whistles through their tail feathers. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on April 12 have found that the diving males twist half their tails as they whiz through the air, apparently to aim the sound in the direction of their potential mates. (2018-04-12)

University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation
Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences that spanned the full color range of the lice genus found on 300 bird species worldwide. (2019-03-05)

Geoscientists follow arsenic from chicken feed to streambeds
Organic arsenic is fed to poultry to prevent bacterial infections and improve weight gain. A little bit of arsenic is taken up by the tissue and the majority of it is excreted. Virginia Tech geoscientists are determining what happens to such feed additives when they are part of the manure applied to agricultural fields. (2005-10-11)

Scalable process discovered to produce structural colors inspired by bird feathers
Researchers made nano-sized balls of melanin aggregate into clusters called supraballs. Melanin appears black in individual nanoparticles. But altering spacing of the nanoparticles in the ball affects how the particles scatter light. A thin silica coating on the outside of melanin nanoparticles acts like a bumper, limiting how close the particles can pack together. Varying the diameter of the melanin core and the thickness of the silica shell creates supraballs in a range of colors. (2017-09-18)

White cheeks are more titillating
Male blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able to overcome an infection with parasites during the previous year. This is according to Elisa Pérez Badás (Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Spain) who is lead author of a study published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature. (2018-02-06)

UT Austin study raises question: Why are fossilized hairs so rare?
New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that when it comes to preserving body parts, fossilized hair is rare--five times rarer than feathers--despite being an important tool for understanding ancient species. This finding has researchers trying to determine if the lack of hair in the fossil record has to do with physical traits that might make it more difficult for hair to fossilize, or an issue with scientists' collection techniques that could lead to them missing important finds. (2017-09-07)

Tiny dinosaur may have dazzled mates with rainbow ruff and a bony crest
Ancient dinosaurs were adorned in some amazing ways, from the horns of the triceratops to the plates and spikes of the stegosaurus. A newly discovered, bird-like dinosaur fossil from China contains evidence that could add a new accessory to the list: a shaggy ruff of rainbow feathers. (2018-01-16)

New discovery pushes origin of feathers back by 70 million years
An international team of palaeontologists, which includes the University of Bristol, has discovered that the flying reptiles, pterosaurs, actually had four kinds of feathers, and these are shared with dinosaurs -- pushing back the origin of feathers by some 70 million years. (2018-12-17)

A new technique for structural color, inspired by birds
Structural coloration has long interested researchers and engineers because of its durability and potential for application in solar arrays, biomimetic tissues and adaptive camouflage. But today's techniques to integrate structural color into materials are time-consuming and costly. Now, researchers have developed a new, more robust and cost effective system to build large-scale metamaterials with structural color. (2016-11-28)

'Live fast, die young' lifestyle reflected in birds' feathers
Animals' lives follow a quicker tempo as they get farther from the equator -- birds at more northern latitudes mature faster, start reproducing younger, and live shorter lives, probably as a way of dealing with seasonal variation in resources. A new study shows for the first time that this pattern also plays out in birds' feathers, with northern birds completing their annual molt faster to keep up with the demands of life far from the tropics. (2018-09-05)

Study shows flight limitations of earliest feathered dinosaurs
Anchiornis, one of the earliest feathered dinosaurs ever discovered, was found to have the ability to fly. However, could it fly like birds today? A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by researchers from China and the U.S. says no. (2019-01-28)

Velociraptor had feathers
Finding of quill knobs on fossilized velociraptor bone demonstrates that even large dinosaurs were feathered and may have descended from animals capable of flight. (2007-09-20)

How urban seasnakes lost their stripes
Researchers studying turtle-headed seasnakes living on coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific noticed something unusual about the snakes' color patterns: seasnakes living in more pristine parts of the reef were decorated with black-and-white bands or blotches. Those in places with more human activity -- near the city or military activity -- were black. As reported in Current Biology on Aug. 10, those color differences are explained by differences in the snakes' exposure to pollution. (2017-08-10)

Molecular analysis of anchiornis feather gives clues to origin of flight
An international team of researchers has performed molecular analysis on fossil feathers from a small, feathered dinosaur from the Jurassic. Their research could aid scientists in pinpointing when feathers evolved the capacity for flight during the dinosaur-bird transition. (2019-01-28)

New insights on comet tails are blowing in the solar wind
Combined observations of Comet McNaught -- one of the brightest comets visible from Earth in the past 50 years -- have revealed new insights on the nature of comets and their relationship with the Sun. (2018-11-02)

Ornithologists at Yelabuga Institute share details of their latest work
Bird Protection and Monitoring Lab was established at the Yelabuga Institute in 2014. Its head is Rinur Bekmansurov, member of the Russian Bird Conservation Union, coordinator of the ringing of raptors at the Russian Raptor Research and Conservation Network, member of the Tatarstan Red Book Commission. (2017-09-12)

Crested pigeons use feathers to sound the alarm
Many animals will sound an alarm to alert other members of their group of impending danger. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 9 have shown that crested pigeons do this in a surprisingly non-vocal way. One of their main flight feathers produces a critical high-pitched sound as the birds fly away. As they flap faster to escape a predator, that alarm signal automatically increases in tempo. (2017-11-09)

EPRI Pilots New Water System For Healthier Habitats
Animals at the Central Park Wildlife Center in New York City will soon get a cleaner, healthier habitat with the introduction of a state-of-the-art electric-based water system, which uses ozone rather than chlorine to purify the Center's aquatic exhibts. (1996-11-01)

Dinosaur parasites trapped in 100-million-year-old amber tell blood-sucking story
Fossilized ticks discovered trapped and preserved in amber show that these parasites sucked the blood of feathered dinosaurs almost 100 million years ago, according to a new article published in Nature Communications today. (2017-12-12)

Poor diet may have caused nosedive in major Atlantic seabird nesting colony
The observed population crash in a colony of sooty terns, tropical seabirds in one of the UK Overseas Territories, is partly due to poor diet, research led by the University of Birmingham has found. (2019-02-03)

'Rainbow' dinosaur had iridescent feathers like a hummingbird
Scientists discovered a dinosaur fossil with feathers so well-preserved that they were able to see the feathers' microscopic color-bearing structures. By comparing the shapes of those feather structures with the structures in modern bird feathers, they're able to infer that the new dino, Caihong juji ('rainbow with the big crest') had iridescent rainbow feathers like a hummingbird. (2018-01-16)

Printable, colorful camouflage with polymers
In nature, colors can serve as a form of communication, but they can also hide animals and plants, camouflaging them from sight. Researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed polymers that can better mimic nature's color-changing abilities than existing polymers. They say the materials could enable smart decorations, camouflage textiles and improved anti-counterfeiting measures. (2018-02-07)

Latest study: Scientists say no evidence exists that therapod dinosaurs evolved into birds
No good evidence exists that fossilized structures found in China and which some paleontologists claim are the earliest known rudimentary feathers were really feathers at all, a renowned ornithologist says. Instead, the fossilized patterns appear to be bits of decomposed skin and supporting tissues that just happen to resemble feathers to a modest degree. (2005-10-10)

Feather replacement or parental care? Migratory birds desert their offspring to molt
A new study shows that when feather replacement and parental care overlap in time, migratory songbirds make a striking trade-off; they desert their offspring, leaving their mates to provide all remaining parental care. (2018-04-19)

Easy-Bake fossils
Scientists have discovered a new way to simulate the fossilization process in a lab in about 24 hours. They take materials like feathers, lizard feet, and leaves and cook them in a lab oven under heat and pressure conditions that mimic what real fossils undergo. These 'Easy-Bake fossils' give us a better idea of how fossilization works and what kinds of biological materials can become fossils. (2018-07-25)

Page 1 of 13 | 513 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.