Popular Fertilizer News and Current Events

Popular Fertilizer News and Current Events, Fertilizer News Articles.
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Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
In the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. The cold winters and other factors can lead to losses for farmers and forage shortages. Researchers have identified annual forage crops that can be cultivated in fields with winter-killed or terminated alfalfa. (2018-01-03)

Climate game changer
New research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata. (2017-08-23)

Agricultural sustainability project reached 20.9 million smallholder farmers across China
An effort to improve crop yields and reduce fertilizer use applied top-down and bottom-up approaches to reach 20 million smallholder farmers across China. (2018-03-09)

Bacterial mechanism converts nitrogen to greenhouse gas
Cornell University researchers have discovered a biological mechanism that helps convert nitrogen-based fertilizer into nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. (2016-12-06)

Too much technology may be killing beneficial bacteria
For years, scientists have known about silver's ability to kill harmful bacteria. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that silver nanoparticles also may destroy benign bacteria that are used to remove ammonia from wastewater treatment systems. The study was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. (2008-04-29)

Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen
An international team discovers that production of a potent greenhouse gas can be bypassed as soil nitrogen breaks down into unreactive atmospheric N2. (2017-01-18)

Agricultural science helping farmers reduce greenhouse gas
With greenhouse gas reduction increasingly on the public agenda, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers say agricultural science may be part of the solution. (2002-12-17)

Study quantifies effect of 'legacy phosphorus' in reduced water quality
For decades, phosphorous has accumulated in Wisconsin soils. Though farmers have taken steps to reduce the quantity of the agricultural nutrient applied to and running off their fields, a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals that a 'legacy' of abundant soil phosphorus in the Yahara watershed of Southern Wisconsin has a large, direct and long-lasting impact on water quality. (2017-03-14)

World War I-era maps help track history of kelp forests in Pacific Northwest
A UChicago ecologist compared maps produced before World War I to recent surveys of kelp forest in the Pacific Northwest, and finds they have been relatively stable over the past century. (2017-12-20)

Corn yield modeling towards sustainable agriculture
Researchers use a 16 year field-experiment dataset to show the ability of a model to fine-tune optimal nitrogen fertilizer rates, and identify five ways it can inform nitrogen management guidelines. Finding the optimal N fertilizer rate is notoriously complex and yet vital to keep profits high and environmental impact low. The work, published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Plant Science is relevant to future food security and sustainable farming methods. (2016-12-14)

Manure could heat your home
Farm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. (2018-03-08)

Measure of age in soil nitrogen could help precision agriculture
What's good for crops is not always good for the environment. Nitrogen, a key nutrient for plants, can cause problems when it leaches into water supplies. University of Illinois engineers developed a model to calculate the age of nitrogen in corn and soybean fields, which could lead to improved fertilizer application techniques to promote crop growth while reducing leaching. (2016-07-25)

Organic fertilizers are an overlooked source of microplastic pollution
Organic fertilizers from biowaste fermentation act as a vehicle for microplastic particles to enter the terrestrial environment, with the amount of microplastic particles differing based on pre-treatment methods and plant type, a new study shows. (2018-04-04)

Illinois River water quality improvement linked to more efficient corn production
In a new University of Illinois study, nitrate concentrations and loads in the Illinois River from 1983 to 2014 were correlated with agricultural nitrogen use efficiency and nitrate discharged from Chicago's treated wastewater. The amount of nitrate that flowed down the river each year from 2010 to 2014 was 10 percent less than the average amount during a baseline period of 1980 to 1996. This reduction is a positive step toward the ultimate goal to reduce nitrate concentrations by 45 percent. (2016-05-10)

New water-quality data on impact of corn, soybeans on nitrate in Iowa streams
As Iowa farmers have planted more acres of corn to meet the demand driven by the corn-based ethanol industry, many models predicted that nitrate concentrations in Iowa streams would increase accordingly. However, recent University of Iowa research based on water monitoring and published in the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation casts doubt on these predictions. (2016-05-24)

Polluted woods: Leaves contaminate soil with hydrocarbon
Researchers have identified natural hydrocarbons in woods and farmlands that had been fertilized with artificial fertilizer, compost or digestate in the past ten years. Soil samples showed high levels of hydrocarbons, especially for samples taken in the woods with concentrations that reached up to four times the legal limit (2017-12-20)

Fixing soybean's need for nitrogen
To make protein, soybean plants need a lot of nitrogen.Beneficial bacteria in root nodules typically assist. A new study shows it's possible to increase the number of soybean root nodules--and the bacteria that live there--to further increase crop yields. This could remove the need to apply additional nitrogen fertilizers. (2018-03-21)

Nitrogen, phosphorus from fertilizers and pet waste polluting urban water
New research from the University of Minnesota points to lawn fertilizers and pet waste as the dominant sources of nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants in seven sub-watersheds of the Mississippi River in Saint Paul, Minn. (2017-04-05)

New approach to improve nitrogen use, enhance yield, and promote flowering in rice
Using nitrogen fertilizer increases crop yields, but excess runoff causes environmental pollution. Moreover, in grains such as rice, large amounts of nitrogen fertilizer can delay flowering, leaving the crop vulnerable to late-season cold weather. A recent study in The Plant Cell identified a rice nitrate transporter that can be overexpressed to increase grain yield and accelerate flowering. This approach has the potential to improve grain yields while avoiding the downside of late maturation. (2018-02-23)

Corn hybrids with high yields come with more variability
The agriculture industry is in a tough spot; it's simultaneously tasked with feeding a growing population and minimizing its environmental footprint. For corn breeders, that means improving nitrogen-use efficiency and crowding tolerance, all while maximizing yield. The first step, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, is understanding the genetic yield potential of current hybrids. (2018-04-09)

Diverse tropical forests grow fast despite widespread phosphorus limitation
Ecological theory says that poor soils limit the productivity of tropical forests, but adding nutrients as fertilizer rarely increases tree growth, suggesting that productivity is not limited by nutrients after all. Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) resolved this apparent contradiction, showing that phosphorus limits the growth of individual tree species but not entire forest communities. Their results, published online in Nature, March 8, have sweeping implications for understanding forest growth and change. (2018-03-07)

Cold conversion of food waste into renewable energy and fertilizer
Researchers from Concordia's Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering (BCEE) in collaboration with Bio-Terre Systems Inc. are taking the fight against global warming to colder climes. (2017-05-31)

Smog-forming soils
A previously unrecognized source of nitrogen oxide is contributing up to about 40 percent of the NOx emissions in California, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. The study traces the emissions to fertilized soils in the Central Valley region. (2018-01-31)

Filling intercropping info gap
In some parts of Africa, farmers intercrop sorghum -- a grain -- and peanuts. But they face a major information gap. There hasn't been much research on optimal levels of fertilizer use for intercropping sorghum and peanuts in these areas. A new study has filled this information gap. Researchers from Niger, Mali, and the United States have developed a method to help farmers determine how much fertilizer to apply when intercropping. (2017-11-15)

Adaptive management of soil conservation is essential to improving water quality
The quality of our rivers and lakes could be placed under pressure from harmful levels of soluble phosphorus, despite well-intended measures to reduce soil erosion and better manage and conserve farmland for crop production, a new study shows. The UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology led a team of international scientists, who found that increased levels of soluble phosphorus in rivers entering Lake Erie, in the USA, may be linked to conservation measures. (2017-01-13)

Phosphorus pollution reaching dangerous levels worldwide, new study finds
Man-made phosphorus pollution is reaching dangerously high levels in freshwater basins around the world, according to new research. (2018-01-25)

A less hazardous means to create phosphorus compounds
Scientists have identified a precursor that helps convert phosphorus into a range of useful compounds, all the while bypassing the need for hazardous intermediate substances that have been conventionally required for such reactions. (2018-02-08)

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching power
Sewage treatment may be an unglamorous job, but bacteria are happy to do it. Sewage plants rely on bacteria to remove environmental toxins from waste so that the processed water can be safely discharged into oceans and rivers. Now, a bacterium discovered by Princeton researchers in a New Jersey swamp may offer a more efficient method for treating toxins found in sewage, fertilizer runoff and other forms of water pollution. (2018-04-11)

Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood
A new study appearing online June 11 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment considers which food type is more environmentally costly to produce: livestock, farmed seafood or wild-caught fish. (2018-06-11)

From compost to composites: An eco-friendly way to improve rubber (video)
The concept of (2018-02-21)

Global diet and farming methods 'must change for environment's sake'
Reducing meat consumption and using more efficient farming methods globally are essential to stave off irreversible damage to the environmental, a new study says. The research, from the University of Minnesota, also found that future increases in agricultural sustainability are likely to be driven by dietary shifts and increases in efficiency, rather than changes between food production systems. (2017-06-15)

Soybean nitrogen breakthrough could help feed the world
Washington State University biologist Mechthild Tegeder has developed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans. Her greenhouse-grown soybean plants fix twice as much nitrogen from the atmosphere as their natural counterparts, grow larger and produce up to 36 percent more seeds. (2016-10-12)

How your diet can influence your environmental impact
The impact of our dietary choices on the global phosphorus footprint shouldn't be neglected, shows a new study. A shift towards a plant-based diet may help decrease environmental impact and attain phosphorus sustainability. (2016-11-03)

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions in an irrigated cropping system
New, enhanced-efficiency fertilizer can reduce N2O emissions from irrigated cropping systems. (2017-06-12)

Microbes help plants survive in severe drought
Plants can better tolerate drought and other stressors with the help of natural microbes, University of Washington research has found. Specifically, plants that are given a dose of microbes stay green longer and are able to withstand drought conditions by growing more leaves and roots and using less water. (2016-10-03)

New biochar model scrubs CO2 from the atmosphere
New Cornell University research suggests an economically viable model to scrub carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to thwart global warming. The researchers propose using a 'bioenergy-biochar system' that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in an environmental pinch, until other removal methods become economically feasible and in regions where other methods are impractical. (2016-10-28)

New research to help reduce number of algae blooms that form annually
The study shows that sampling headwaters where streams form can identify which landscapes are resilient enough to handle the rigors of farming and which are vulnerable to leaching toxic residue into waterways. (2018-01-17)

Radish cover crop traps nitrogen; mystery follows
New research supports the use of radish as a cover crop as a trap crop for fall nitrogen. However, what happens to that nitrogen afterward remains unknown. (2018-05-30)

Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics. (2019-03-27)

WSU researchers taking sustainability of organic farming to new level
Washington State University researchers have received a $1.5 million federal grant to help organic farmers keep a better account of their ecological footprint. Seven researchers in the WSU Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems Engineering and USDA Agricultural Research Service will focus in particular on carbon and nitrogen -- two elements central to farming and out of balance with the planet's biological boundaries. (2010-09-29)

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