Popular Fish News and Current Events

Popular Fish News and Current Events, Fish News Articles.
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The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Reef engineers
The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. That white sand slithering between your toes? It consists mostly of their excrement. (2019-04-30)

For selenium in rivers, timing matters
Researchers have gained new insight into an ongoing environmental health problem. (2021-02-23)

Illuminating the genome
Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes. (2019-03-08)

Better, cheaper bio-ink may be used to create artificial organs
A new bio-ink that may support a more efficient and inexpensive fabrication of human tissues and organs has been created by researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus. The UBC team analyzed the physical and biological properties of three different GelMA hydrogels -- porcine skin, cold-water fish skin and cold-soluble gelatin. (2017-09-13)

Experience trumps youth among jumping fish
Tiny jumping fish can leap further as they get older, new research shows. (2018-03-16)

The heat is on
Climate change is reorganizing the life in our oceans in a big way: as waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful. So say an international group of scientists in the most comprehensive assessment of the effects of ocean warming on the distribution fish communities. (2019-11-25)

Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska's most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. (2017-01-18)

The galloping evolution in seahorses
A genome project, comprising six evolutionary biologists from Professor Axel Meyer's research team from Konstanz and researchers from China and Singapore, sequenced and analyzed the genome of the tiger tail seahorse. (2016-12-14)

Extraordinary regeneration of neurons in zebrafish
Biologists from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a uniquely rapid form of regeneration in injured neurons and their function in the central nervous system of zebrafish. They studies the Mauthner cells, which are solely responsible for the escape behaviour of the fish, and previously regarded as incapable of regeneration. However, their ability to regenerate crucially depends on the location of the injury. (2020-07-10)

Climate change scientists should think more about sex
Climate change can have a different impact on male and female fish, shellfish and other marine animals, with widespread implications for the future of marine life and the production of seafood. (2017-01-31)

NIH researchers identify how eye loss occurs in blind cavefish
Loss of eye tissue in blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus), which occurs within a few days of their development, happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes, according to a study led by the National Institutes of Health. Epigenetic regulation is a process where genes are turned off or on, typically in a reversible or temporary manner. This mechanism differs from genetic mutations, which are permanent changes in the DNA code. The study appears in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2018-05-29)

Deep-sea fish reveals twilight trick
A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions. University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions. (2017-11-08)

Overfishing increases fluctuations in aquatic ecosystems
Overfishing reduces fish populations and promotes smaller sizes in fish. The fish also reach sexual maturity earlier than normal. However, the impact of overfishing is not restricted to fish: as the predators at the top of the food web dwindle, the stability of the entire aquatic ecosystem is at risk. (2016-03-02)

Climate change affects fish reproductive phenology in plateau area: Study
The Research Group of Biological Invasion and Adaptive Evolution (BIAE; PI: CHEN Yifeng) at Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently answered how reproductive phenology of Gymnocypris selincuoensis, an endemic fish in Lake Selicuo in Tibetan Plateau, associated with climate changes. (2018-01-19)

Inherent feminizing effect of germ cells: New insights into sex determination
Germ cells have long been recognized as the only cells that can transfer genetic materials to the next generation via the sperm or egg. However, recent analyses in medaka (teleost fish) revealed another essential role of germ cells -- feminizing the gonads. Researchers showed the feminizing effect of germ cells occurs in parallel with other reproductive elements. Germ cells in medaka may have a potential to feminize gonads at the moment they have developed. (2018-03-29)

Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatened
When trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos raises a herpetological mystery: If they have armor, why do they discard it? (2017-08-03)

Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversity: Study
Climate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph. It is a surprising and important finding, as humans rely upon freshwater lakes for more than one-fifth of their protein needs worldwide, says lead author Prof. Andrew MacDougall in U of G's Department of Integrative Biology. (2018-03-23)

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fish
The University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor real-time schools of fish. This system, which combines optical and acoustic technologies, will be environmentally friendly and will provide reliable information about the condition of marine fish stocks, something that at the moment is practically impossible to achieve without investing enormous resources. (2018-06-20)

Important development could reduce numbers of fish required in toxicology research
Scientists at the University of Plymouth, working in partnership with AstraZeneca, have developed a new method which could help assess the effects of chemicals on digestive systems. (2018-03-26)

Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
Type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-01-13)

Fish oil does not appear to improve asthma control in teens, young adults
Fish oil does not appear to improve asthma control in adolescents and young adults with uncontrolled asthma who are overweight or obese, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-01-25)

Mercury rising: Are the fish we eat toxic?
Canadian researchers say industrial sea fishing may be exposing people in coastal and island nations to excessively high levels of mercury. (2018-05-03)

Bad news for Nemo
The beloved anemone fish popularized by the movies 'Finding Nemo' and 'Finding Dory' don't have the genetic capacity to adapt to rapid changes in their environment, according to a new study. (2019-11-27)

UK chalk-stream salmon genetically unique
Salmon from the chalk streams of southern England are genetically unique, researchers have discovered. (2018-01-30)

More squid, less fish: North Pacific seabirds alter their prey preferences
Over the last 125 years, and particularly after an uptick in industrial fishing since 1950, North Pacific seabirds -- typically fish consumers -- have shifted their prey preferences, a new study reports; they are eating lower on the food chain, consuming more squid. (2018-02-14)

Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to count individual fish by measuring the concentration of environmental DNA in the water, which could be applied for quantitative monitoring of aquatic ecosystems. (2020-07-03)

Dolphins tear up nets as fish numbers fall
Fishing nets suffer six times more damage when dolphins are around - and overfishing is forcing dolphins and fishermen ever closer together, new research shows. (2018-03-29)

Fish step up to lead when predators are near
Researchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that some fish within a shoal take on the responsibilities of leader when they are under threat from predators. (2017-05-03)

Herring larvae could benefit from an acidifying ocean
Excess CO2 in the atmosphere is making the oceans more acidic. Some studies show that's bad news for fish, including commercially important species. But a new study shows that herring might be able to tolerate this change. (2018-03-29)

Breeding trouble: Meta-analysis identifies fishy issues with captive stocks
A meta-analysis has found patterns that may be jeopardising the long-term success of worldwide animal breeding programs, which increasingly act as an insurance against extinction in conservation, and for food security. Captive-born animals had, on average, almost half the odds of reproductive success compared to their wild-born counterparts in captivity; in aquaculture, the effects were particularly pronounced. The Sydney-based scientists were surprised by how universal the patterns were across the animal kingdom. (2018-03-13)

Camelina oil improves blood lipid profile
The use of camelina oil reduces overall and LDL cholesterol levels in persons with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. (2018-01-08)

Choose Omega-3s from fish over flax for cancer prevention, study finds
Omega-3s from fish pack a stronger punch than flaxseed and other oils when it comes to cancer prevention, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study. (2018-01-26)

Deep-sea fish choose habitat according to genotype, new research says
Scientists have found evidence of natural selection in a deep-sea fish species adapting to the depth of ocean that it inhabits. (2018-03-05)

Despite odds, fish species that bypasses sexual reproduction is thriving
An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of the Amazon molly, a fish that reproduces asexually. The researchers expected that the asexual organism would be at a genetic disadvantage, but the Amazon molly is thriving. (2018-02-12)

Largest Chinook salmon disappearing from West Coast
The largest and oldest Chinook salmon -- fish also known as 'kings' and prized for their exceptional size -- have mostly disappeared along the West Coast, according to a new University of Washington-led study. (2018-02-27)

Study finds a pesticide-free way to combat mosquitos and West Nile
Researchers at the University of Waterloo may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus. (2018-06-18)

Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (2018-01-22)

Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to survive
A small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. A team led by biologists at the University of Washington is trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior. (2018-01-17)

Fish the primary source of nutrition in medieval Northern Ostrobothnia
Researchers investigated the diet of people buried in the Ii Hamina, Northern Finland, cemetery from the 15th to the 17th centuries by analysing isotopes in the bones of the deceased. Isotopes preserve information on the various nutrient sources used by humans during their lifetime. A study published in the Environmental Archaeology journal reveals that the dominant protein source was small fish, such as roach or Baltic herring. (2018-03-16)

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