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Popular Flame Retardants News and Current Events, Flame Retardants News Articles.
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Exposure to common flame retardants may raise the risk of papillary thyroid cancer
Some flame retardants used in many home products appear to be associated with the most common type of thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), according to a new study being presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting, ENDO 2017, in Orlando, Fla. (2017-04-01)

SRMs track fire retardants in humans and environment
To help scientists evaluate the risks of polybrominated diphenylethers by improving measurements of these pollutants in the environment, NIST has re-evaluated several of its environmental reference materials to report PBDE concentrations in them (2007-08-16)

Engines fire without smoke
Car manufacturers could clean up vehicle exhausts using a new model of gasoline combustion developed using experimental data. (2017-05-29)

ChemMaps lets researchers navigate the chemical universe
A new online service -- ChemMaps -- allows users to interactively navigate the chemical space of over 8,000 drugs and 47,000 environmental compounds in 3D and real time. (2018-06-04)

UCF researchers discover mechanisms for the cause of the Big Bang
The origin of the universe started with the Big Bang, but how the supernova explosion ignited has long been a mystery -- until now. (2019-10-31)

New clue to solving the mystery of the sun's hot atmosphere
The elemental composition of the Sun's hot atmosphere known as the 'corona' is strongly linked to the 11-year solar magnetic activity cycle, a team of scientists from UCL, George Mason University and Naval Research Laboratory has revealed for the first time. (2017-08-03)

Fishy chemicals in farmed salmon
The American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology featured research by Carla Ng, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, on the cover of its June 19 issue. Dr. Ng tracked the presence of a class of synthetic flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were once a popular additive to increase fire resistance in consumer products such as electronics, textiles, and plastics. (2018-07-10)

Improved plastics recycling thanks to spectral imaging
Plastics recycling is complicated by the need to recycle similar plastics together. The presence of flame retardants in plastics also needs to be identified, and a NIR hyperspectral imaging method to do so is reported in this paper in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal, JSI -- Journal of Spectral Imaging. (2019-01-22)

Texas A&M researchers develop fire-retardant coating featuring renewable materials
Texas A&M University researchers are developing a new kind of flame-retardant coating using renewable, nontoxic materials readily found in nature, which could provide even more effective fire protection for several widely used materials (2019-02-12)

Smoked Out: Researchers develop a new wildfire smoke emissions model
A Brigham Young University chemical engineering professor and his Ph.D. student have developed an advanced model that can help predict pollution caused by wildfire smoke. The research, sponsored by the USDA Forest Service and the Department of Energy, provides a physical model that can more reliably predict soot and smoke emissions from wildfires over a range of conditions. (2018-08-24)

Handwashing and house cleaning may protect against unhealthy chemicals
Washing your hands and cleaning your house frequently may help to lower your contact with common flame-retardant chemicals, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The study is the first to assess whether house cleaning and handwashing can effectively lower exposure to flame retardants. Results appear in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. (2018-06-28)

'Environmentally friendly' flame retardant could degrade into less safe compounds
To reduce the risk of fire, many everyday products -- from building materials to furniture to clothing -- contain flame retardants. In recent years, some of these compounds were shown to have harmful effects on the environment, causing them to be replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives. However, a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicates that heat or ultraviolet light could break down a 'safe' flame retardant into potentially harmful compounds. (2019-01-09)

Experts discover historic roots of Medicare for All, public option and free-market proposals
As political leaders debate the future of the US health care system, a pair of health financing experts discovered that all of the current proposals -- from Medicare for All to 'repeal and replace' -- have been circulating in various forms since the 1940s. For example, today's 'public option' plans that would offer individuals the option to buy-in to Medicare or Medicaid were first proposed by two Republicans, Sen. Jacob Javits and Rep. John Lindsay in the early 1960s. (2019-04-01)

Flame retardants and likelihood of pregnancy in women undergoing fertility treatments
Women with higher urinary concentrations of a common type of flame retardant had reduced likelihood of clinical pregnancy and live birth than those with lower concentrations, according to researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study, conducted in the Fertility Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital, is the first to examine associations between organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) -- which are used in polyurethane foam in many products, including upholstered furniture, baby products, and gym mats -- and reproductive outcomes in women. (2017-08-25)

Renewables could drastically cut tailpipe emissions
Ethanol and related gasoline replacement fuels produce fewer smog-causing chemicals. (2018-08-12)

Too little is known about wildfire smoke
How do fire-suppression chemicals and pesticides affect wildfire smoke and the health of those who breathe it? UC Davis graduate students discovered that this question cannot be answered based on current scientific evidence and, in a review published in 'Current Topics in Toxicology,' they recommend studies on the compounds in wildfire smoke. (2017-10-03)

Degradable electronic components created from corn starch
As consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. To help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components. They report their development in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. (2017-04-19)

A shake-up in cell culturing: Flame sterilization may affect the culture
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that flame-sterilizing shake-flasks, to avoid introducing microbial contaminants, considerably increases the carbon dioxide concentration in the flasks. This enhanced carbon dioxide concentration affects the growth of some microbial species, which may affect the quantity of vaccines or other valuable substances produced by the microbes. (2020-07-01)

Pearly material for bendable heating elements (video)
The iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices. (2018-01-24)

A new approach boosts lithium-ion battery efficiency and puts out fires, too
Building new functionality into an overlooked lithium-ion battery component addresses two major goals of battery research: extending the driving range of electric vehicles and reducing the danger that laptops, cell phones and other devices will burst into flames. (2020-10-15)

Newly discovered moth named Icarus sports a flame-shaped mark and prefers high elevations
New species of owlet moth recently discovered to inhabit high-elevation mountains in western North America was named after the Greek mythological character Icarus. In their paper published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, scientists Dr. Lars Crabo and Dr. Christian Schmidt explain that the combination of the distinct flame-shaped mark on the moth's forewing and its high-elevation habitat was quick to remind them of the myth of Icarus. (2018-10-09)

Newly discovered 'blue whirl' fire tornado burns cleaner for reduced emissions
University of Maryland researchers say their discovery of a type of fire tornado they call a 'blue whirl' could lead to beneficial new approaches for reduced carbon emissions and improved oil spill cleanup. (2016-08-04)

Potentially toxic chemicals from LCDs in nearly half of household dust samples tested
Chemicals commonly used in smartphone, television, and computer displays were found to be potentially toxic and present in nearly half of dozens of samples of household dust collected by a team of toxicologists led by the University of Saskatchewan (USask). The international research team, led by USask environmental toxicologist John Giesy, is sounding the alarm about liquid crystal monomers and the potential threat they pose to humans and the environment. (2019-12-10)

Liquid metals the secret ingredients to clean up environment
Liquid metal catalysts show great promise for capturing carbon and cleaning up pollutants, requiring so little energy they can even be created in the kitchen. (2019-10-11)

Flame retardants and pesticides overtake heavy metals as biggest contributors to IQ loss
Adverse outcomes from childhood exposures to lead and mercury are on the decline in the United States, likely due to decades of restrictions on the use of heavy metals, a new study finds. (2020-01-14)

Standardized house dust aids health researchers
NIST chemists have created a standardized form of common house dust to support environmental scientists studying our everyday exposure to a catalog of potentially hazardous chemicals. (2007-02-01)

SDSU researchers find new way to measure nicotine exposure in children
A team of researchers from SDSU has found silicone wristbands to be an effective way to measure children's exposure to secondhand smoke. (2019-02-14)

Tent camping could lead to flame retardant exposure
For campers, nothing beats sleeping in a tent in the great outdoors. But scientists are finding out the air inside tents might not be as fresh as people think. A study appearing in Environmental Science & Technology has found that flame retardants used in the manufacturing of tents are released in the air within this enclosed space, which could lead to campers breathing them in. (2016-05-11)

New flame retardants, old problems
New flame retardants escaping from our TVs, other electrical and electronic products, and children's car seats are just as toxic as the flame retardants they're intended to replace, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. The authors found that the replacement chemicals, called organophosphate flame retardants, have been associated with lower IQ in children, reproductive problems, and other serious health harms. (2019-10-22)

A firefighter drone that flies and crawls up walls
A research team at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology led by Professor Hyun Myung of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department developed an unmanned aerial vehicle, named the Fireproof Aerial RObot System, which detects fires in skyscrapers, searches the inside of the building, and transfers data in real time from fire scenes to the ground station. (2016-01-18)

Hands spread flame retardants, plasticizers throughout homes
Hundreds of everyday items, from furniture to cell phones to floor wax, contain organophosphate ester (OPE) flame retardants and plasticizers. Some of these compounds make their way into the air, onto surfaces and even inside our bodies, with uncertain health effects. Today, researchers report that hands play a central role in transferring OPEs throughout the indoor environment. The researchers are presenting their results at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-04-02)

Putting gas under pressure
Understanding gas flames' response to acoustic perturbations at high pressure should make next-generation turbines safer and more efficient. (2018-07-12)

Compostable food containers could release PFAS into environment
Compostable food containers seem like a great idea: They degrade into nutrient-rich organic matter, reducing waste and the need for chemical fertilizers. But much of this packaging relies on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to repel water and oil. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have shown that PFAS can leach from the containers into compost. However, the potential health effects of applying this material to crops are unknown. (2019-05-29)

Nine ornamental landscape plants tested for salt tolerance
Nine ornamental species were irrigated with a nutrient solution at three different electrical conductivity rates and were assessed for growth and physiological responses. Orange peel jessamine and mexican hummingbird bush were the most salt-tolerant in the trials, while flame acanthus, rock rose, and 'Dark knight' bluebeard were moderately salt-tolerant. Cardinal flower, mexican false heather, and butterfly blue plants were moderately salt-sensitive, while eastern red columbine was the most salt-sensitive among the species. (2016-05-09)

Novel algorithm simulates water evaporation at the nanoscale
The evaporation of water that occurs when it meets a hot surface is understood in continuum theory and in experimentation. Before now, researchers were unable to study it at nanoscales in molecular simulation. YD and Maroo's algorithm has made that possible, and their paper, 'Surface-Heating Algorithm for Water at Nanoscale,' has garnered notable attention in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. (2015-10-16)

Plastic gets a do-over: Breakthrough discovery recycles plastic from the inside out
A team of researchers at Berkeley Lab has designed a recyclable plastic that, like a Lego playset, can be disassembled into its constituent parts at the molecular level, and then reassembled into a different shape, texture, and color again and again without loss of performance or quality. (2019-05-06)

Scientists create a UV detector based on nanocrystals synthesized by using ion implantation
Scientists at the Lobachevsky University have been working for several years to develop solar-blind photodetectors operating in the UV spectral band. In the field of electronic technology, this is an important task, since such devices cut off emission with a wavelength higher than 280 nm, which helps to avoid interference from sunlight and to record UV emission during daylight. (2018-08-06)

Cell death in porpoises caused by environmental pollutants
Environmental pollutants threaten the health of marine mammals. This study established a novel cell-based assay using the fibroblasts of a finless porpoise stranded along the coast of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, to better understand the cytotoxicity and the impacts of environmental pollutants on the porpoise population. The results revealed that the concentrations of PCBs and DDTs which accumulated in the porpoise are likely to have an adverse effect at the cellular level. (2020-07-20)

New look at old data leads to cleaner engines
New insights about how to understand and ultimately control the chemistry of ignition behavior and pollutant formation have been discovered in research led by Sandia National Laboratories. The discovery eventually will lead to cleaner, more efficient internal combustion engines. (2019-06-10)

Chemicals in your living room cause diabetes
A new UC Riverside study shows flame retardants found in nearly every American home cause mice to give birth to offspring that become diabetic. (2020-11-10)

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