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Popular Flame Retardants News and Current Events, Flame Retardants News Articles.
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Curbing the flammability of epoxy resin
How to improve the flame retardant performance of two-dimensional flame retardants? In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from Henan University have investigated the flame retardant performance of epoxy resin using a boron nitride nanosheet decorated with cobalt ferrite nanoparticle. (2019-06-19)

Exposure to environmental PCBs impairs brain function in mice
Human-made toxic chemicals that linger indefinitely in the environment disrupt the performance of critical helper cells in the mouse brain, leading to impaired function over long-term exposures. (2019-10-22)

Chemicals in your living room cause diabetes
A new UC Riverside study shows flame retardants found in nearly every American home cause mice to give birth to offspring that become diabetic. (2020-11-10)

Pet tags link widely used flame retardant to hyperthyroidism in cats
Feline hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrine-related disease of older cats, and its prevalence has skyrocketed since the first case was diagnosed in 1979. At the same time, new household flame retardants were introduced, and recently, scientists have suspected a link. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have associated hyperthyroidism with another class of flame retardants, using silicone pet tags similar to the popular wristbands that many people wear for charitable causes. (2019-07-10)

Many arctic pollutants decrease after market removal and regulation
Levels of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention are decreasing in the Arctic, according to an international team of researchers who have been actively monitoring the northern regions of the globe. (2018-08-27)

Harmonization needed!
Since the first reports on a dramatic increase in microplastic contamination in the sea twenty years ago, research efforts have intensified worldwide. A review in the journal Angewandte Chemie has critically evaluated these studies and concludes that the analytical methods have to be harmonized to get comparable data. Further development is needed to assess particles in the lower micrometer range and below as well, as these pose the highest risks for aquatic ecosystems. (2017-01-05)

OSU researchers determine why pulsed sparks make for better ignition
Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in all types of combustion systems. (2018-07-16)

Wristband samplers show similar chemical exposure across three continents
After Oregon State University researchers deployed chemicals to individuals on three continents, they found that no two wristbands had identical chemical detections. But the same 14 chemicals were detected in more than 50 percent of the wristbands returned from the United States, Africa and South America. (2019-04-22)

Peregrine falcons may face new environmental threat
ess than five years after being removed from the endangered species list, peregrine falcons could be facing a new threat. A Swedish study found that eggs of peregrine falcons in that country contain high levels of a popular flame retardant, deca-BDE, which scientists have long thought could not get into wildlife. Falcons in North America are likely to face the same threat, the researchers say. (2004-01-07)

Characterization of 'hidden' dioxins from informal e-waste processing
The composition of mixed brominated/chlorinated dibenzofurans (PXDFs) and diphenyl ethers in soils from an e-waste site in Ghana suggests a formation of PXDFs through condensation of the flame retardant PBDEs and subsequent bromine-to-chlorine exchange. PXDFs were substantial contributors of toxic equivalents among dioxins from e-waste burning. (2019-04-13)

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants linked to poorer behavioral function in children
New research from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine suggests that prenatal exposure to flame retardants and perfluoroalkyl substances commonly found in the environment may have a lasting effect on a child's cognitive and behavioral development, known as executive function. (2016-01-27)

New software spots, isolates cyber-attacks to protect networked control systems
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a software algorithm that detects and isolates cyber-attacks on networked control systems -- which are used to coordinate transportation, power and other infrastructure across the United States. (2013-05-14)

Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows. (2020-05-12)

Plastic contaminants harm sea urchins
Plastics in the ocean can release chemicals that cause deformities in sea urchin larvae, new research shows. (2020-11-30)

NYC toddlers exposed to potentially harmful flame retardants
Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) within the Mailman School of Public Health report evidence of potentially harmful flame retardants on the hands and in the homes of 100 percent of a sample of New York City mothers and toddlers. The study also found that on average toddlers in New York City had higher levels of common flame-retardants on their hands compared to their mothers. (2017-01-23)

FSU researchers develop thin heat shield for superfast aircraft
The world of aerospace increasingly relies on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites to build the structures of satellites, rockets and jet aircraft. But the life of those materials is limited by how they handle heat. A team of FAMU-FSU College of Engineering researchers from Florida State University's High-Performance Materials Institute is developing a design for a heat shield that better protects those extremely fast machines. (2019-11-14)

How do foams collapse?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have successfully found two distinct mechanisms by which foams can collapse, yielding insight into the prevention/acceleration of foam rupture in industrial materials e.g. foods, cosmetics, insulation, stored chemicals. When a bubble breaks, they found that a collapse event propagates via impact with the receding film and tiny scattered droplets breaking other bubbles. Identifying which mechanism is dominant in different foams may help tailor them to specific applications. (2019-06-08)

Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health. (2020-06-01)

UCSF study identifies chemicals in pregnant women
The bodies of virtually all US pregnant women carry multiple chemicals, including some banned since the 1970s and others used in common products such as non-stick cookware, processed foods and personal care products, according to a new study from UCSF. (2011-01-14)

Chemicals used as fire retardants could be harmful, UC-Riverside researchers say
Margarita Curras-Collazo's lab at the University of California-Riverside has done research that shows that polybrominated diphenyl ethers, chemicals used as fire retardants, disrupt mechanisms that are responsible for releasing hormones in the body. Moreover, her lab has shown that like polychlorinated biphenyls, whose manufacture in the US was discontinued in 1977, PBDEs alter calcium signaling in the brain. (2007-12-10)

Sticky, stony and sizzling science launching to space station
NASA's commercial partner Orbital ATK plans to launch its Cygnus spacecraft into orbit on March 22, 2016 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket for its fifth contracted resupply mission to the International Space Station. The flight, known as Orbital ATK CRS-6, will deliver investigations to the space station to study fire, meteors, regolith, adhesion, and 3-D printing in microgravity. (2016-03-09)

Difficulties of keeping the global food supply chain safe
The difficulties of keeping the food supply chain in a worldwide network of food producers, processors and distributors are highlighted in an Editorial in this week's special gastroenterology edition of the Lancet. (2007-05-10)

Research shows hidden fire risk of emollients
New research carried out by forensic scientists at Anglia Ruskin University has shown that commonly-used emollients can pose a significant fire risk once they have dried on fabric such as clothing and bedding. (2019-02-04)

How to protect gymnasts from hazardous chemicals at gym facilities
In an intervention study, aimed at addressing high exposures among gymnasts to toxic flame retardant chemicals, researchers show that replacing the foam cubes in the landing pits with flame retardant-free alternatives can significantly reduce their exposures. (2019-03-26)

Flame retardant chemicals may affect social behavior in young children
Some chemicals added to furniture, electronics and numerous other goods to prevent fires may have unintended developmental consequences for young children, according to a pilot study released today. (2017-03-09)

Women firefighters face high exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals
San Francisco's women firefighters are exposed to higher levels of certain toxic PFAS chemicals than women working in downtown San Francisco offices, shows a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, San Francisco, and Silent Spring Institute. The study represents one of the first published results from the Women Firefighter Biomonitoring Collaborative, a long-term investigation into breast cancer risks faced by women firefighters. (2020-02-26)

Pesticide exposure may be ALS risk factor
ALS is a debilitating, progressive disease without a cure. Researchers now find pesticides and other environmental toxins could play a part in the disease's onset. (2016-05-09)

Banned chemicals pass through umbilical cord from mother to baby, research finds
Trace amounts of flame retardants, banned in the US for more than a decade, are still being passed through umbilical cord blood from mothers to their babies, according to new Indiana University research. The chemicals are linked to health concerns including hormone disruption and low birth weight. (2017-06-29)

Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys
New research suggests that more than 100 chemicals found in plastic toy materials may pose possible health risks to children. The study provides findings that may lead to stricter international regulations. (2021-02-22)

Dung beetles use stars for orientation
An insect with a tiny brain and minimal computing power has become the first animal proven to use the Milky Way for orientation. (2013-01-24)

The promise of greener power generation
The characterization of compounds produced in combustion could lead to cleaner, more efficient power stations. (2016-12-04)

Perinatal exposure to flame retardant alters epigenome, predisposing metabolic disease
A UMass Amherst study showed that environmentally relevant exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), a brominated flame retardant, through the umbilical cord and breast milk permanently changed liver metabolism in rats. (2019-12-13)

New progress in turbulent combustion modeling: Filtered flamelet model
Recently, a new modeling idea for turbulent diffusion flame has been proposed by Lipo Wang's group from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Jian Zhang from the Institute of Mechanics, CAS. (2020-02-07)

Toward a new generation of superplastics
Scientists are reporting an in-depth validation of the discovery of the world's first mass producible, low-cost, organoclays for plastics. The powdered material, made from natural clay, would be a safer, more environmentally friendly replacement for the compound widely used to make plastics nanocomposites. A report on the research appears in ACS' Macromolecules, a biweekly journal. (2010-07-21)

Ultra-thin wires for quantum computing
Take a fine strand of silica fiber, attach it at each end to a slow-turning motor, torture it over a flame until it nearly reaches its melting point and then pull it apart. The middle will thin out like taffy until it is less than half a micron across, and that, according to researchers at the University of Maryland, is how you fabricate ultrahigh transmission optical nanofibers, a potential component for future quantum information devices. (2014-06-17)

How everyday products are supercharging landfill gas, and what that means
Synthetic compounds increasingly used in everyday products like shampoo and motor oil are finding their way into landfills and supercharging the biogas those landfills produce, researchers at the University of Michigan have found. (2019-11-13)

UTHealth researchers find industrial chemicals in food samples
Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have discovered phthalates, industrial chemicals, in common foods purchased in the United States. Phthalates can be found in a variety of products and food packaging material, child-care articles and medical devices. (2013-03-06)

NIST unblinded me with science: New application of blue light sees through fire
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated that ordinary blue light can be used to significantly improve the ability to see objects engulfed by large, non-smoky natural gas fires -- like those used in laboratory fire studies and fire-resistance standards testing. (2018-07-23)

Large scale preparation method of high quality SWNT sponges
In a NANO paper published in NANO, a group of researchers have developed a simple flame burning method to prepare single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) sponges on a large scale. The SWNT sponge has multifunctional properties and can be used in the fields of cleaning-up, sensing and energy storage. (2018-08-23)

Autistic features linked to prenatal exposure to fire retardants, phthalates
Exposure during pregnancy to a combination of fire retardant chemicals and phthalate chemicals--both present in the average home--can contribute to autistic-like behaviors in the offspring, according to an animal study to be presented Thursday at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in San Diego. (2015-03-05)

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