Popular Flight News and Current Events

Popular Flight News and Current Events, Flight News Articles.
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Aerial robot that can morph in flight
French researchers have drawn inspiration from birds to design an aerial robot capable of altering its profile during flight. To reduce its wingspan and navigate through tight spaces, it can reorient its arms, which are equipped with propellers that let it fly like a helicopter. It paves the way for a new generation of large robots that can move through narrow passages, making them ideal for exploration as well as search and rescue missions. (2018-05-31)

Quantum momentum
Occasionally we come across a problem in classical mechanics that poses particular difficulties for translation into the quantum world. A new mathematical model published in EPJ D has provided some insights into one of them: momentum. The model uses another classical concept, that of time-of-flight. (2019-08-07)

Webb Telescope sunshield passes launch depressurization tests to verify flight design
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope continues to make significant progress, successfully completing a series of sunshield vent tests that validate the telescope's sunshield design. (2010-10-08)

NASA confirms re-discovered IMAGE satellite
The identity of the satellite re-discovered on Jan. 20, 2018, has been confirmed as NASA's IMAGE satellite. (2018-01-31)

New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture
In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences in the University of Missouri's School of Medicine have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. The study will form the basis of future research on the bird's wishbone, which is supported by these particular muscles and is hypothesized to bend during flight. (2019-04-30)

Tropical Depression 1E dissipates
Tropical Depression 1E or TD1E didn't get far from the time it was born to the time it weakened to a remnant low pressure area along the southwestern coast of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of it remnant clouds. (2016-06-08)

New study changes our view on flying insects
For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. At this speed, they are the most efficient and consume the least amount of energy. Corresponding phenomena have previously been demonstrated in birds, but never among insects. (2017-09-29)

More can be done to prevent children from having in-flight medical emergencies
Resources are limited on an airplane during an in-flight emergency and access to care is not always immediate. A new study published in Annals of Emergency Medicine reveals that 15.5 percent of in-flight emergencies involve children and that one in six cases require additional care. (2019-07-25)

The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyer
The question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with state-of-the-art synchrotron microtomography at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (Grenoble, France), allowed an international team of scientists to answer this question in Nature Communications. The wing bones of Archaeopteryx were shaped for incidental active flight, but not for the advanced style of flying mastered by today's birds. (2018-03-13)

Missing link shows bats flew first, developed echolocation later
The discovery of a remarkably well-preserved fossil representing the most primitive bat species known to date demonstrates that the animals evolved the ability to fly before they could echolocate. (2008-02-13)

Smooth, manmade surfaces create a 'blind spot' for bats using echolocation
Bats are well known for their sophisticated use of echolocation to navigate through areas riddled with obstacles, but now a new study reveals that this useful ability is hindered in the face of smooth vertical surfaces -- those that are particularly likely to be manmade. (2017-09-07)

Freeze and flee: The costly 'escape' response of narwhals
East Greenland narwhals exhibit both 'freeze' and 'flee' responses when escaping from threats, researchers report. (2017-12-07)

Aerospace test at Sandia goes green with alternative to explosives
Sandia National Laboratories has successfully demonstrated a new, more environmentally friendly method to test a rocket part to ensure its avionics can withstand the shock from stage separation during flight. (2017-08-31)

Children with medical emergencies during airline flights have limited aid
Children afflicted with medical emergencies during commercial airline trips tend to have common ailments such as vomiting, fever or allergic reactions -- events that should be easily treated, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers. But few airlines stock first-aid kits with pediatric versions of therapies that would help, including liquid forms of pain relievers or allergy medications. (2019-07-25)

Australian fire beetle avoids the heat
The Australian jewel beetle Merimna atrata has several heat sensors. Originally it was thought that it uses them to detect forest fires as the insect lays its eggs in the wood of burned eucalyptus trees. Researchers at the University of Bonn were finally able to refute this hypothesis. Instead, the beetle appears to need its heat sensors for a different purpose: to not burn its feet on landing. The study has now been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-02-15)

Stunning footage shows how drones can boost turtle conservation
Drones are changing the face of turtle research and conservation, a new study shows. (2018-02-28)

NASA'S OSIRIS-REx spacecraft slingshots past Earth
NASA's asteroid sample return spacecraft successfully used Earth's gravity on Friday to slingshot itself on a path toward the asteroid Bennu, for a rendezvous next August. (2017-09-22)

Do differences in anatomy matter for achieving orgasm?
A recent review of the medical literature reveals that differences in anatomy may help explain why some individuals experience orgasms more successfully than others. (2016-04-07)

Using whole genome analysis to home in on racing pigeon performance
A scientific team led by Malgorzata Anna Gazda and Miguel Carneiro, performed the first whole genome sequencing of 10 racing pigeons as well as data from 35 different breeds, and has now identified new clues in racing pigeons that may help enhance their performance. The study also including looking at gene expression differences (using RNA sequencing expression data) in the brains and muscle tissue of racing pigeons versus other breeds. (2018-03-13)

Powerful nearby supernova caught by web
One of the nearest supernovas in the last 25 years has been identified over a decade after it exploded. This result was made possible by combining data from the vast online archives from many of the world's premier telescopes. (2008-09-25)

SwRI scientist helps characterize water on lunar surface
A Southwest Research Institute scientist with expertise in how water reacts with lunar soil contributed to a new study that indicates water and/or hydroxyl may be more prevalent on the Moon's surface than previously thought. (2018-02-23)

The flight speed of birds is more complex than previously thought
The flight speed of birds is more complex than research has previously managed to show. In a new study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers have found that birds use multiple -- each one simple yet effective -- methods to control their speed in the air and compensate for tailwind, headwind and sidewind. (2017-12-13)

NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Owen's remnants reorganizing
The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Owen have been lingering in the Southern Pacific Ocean for days. On Dec. 10, 2018 the storm finally appeared more organized on satellite imagery providing forecasters with a strong indication that it may be reborn as a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Gulf of Carpentaria and saw the storm. (2018-12-10)

Penguin brains not changed by loss of flight
Losing the ability to fly gave ancient penguins their unique locomotion style. But leaving the sky behind didn't cause major changes in their brain structure, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin suggest after examining the skull of the oldest known penguin fossil. (2016-03-01)

What the first American astronauts taught us about living in space
Project Mercury proved that humans could live and work in space, paving the way for all future human exploration. (2018-03-27)

To breed or not to breed? Migratory female butterflies face a monsoonal dilemma
Female butterflies make smart investments, finds a new study. (2017-10-03)

Chronic fatigue patients more likely to suppress emotions
Chronic fatigue syndrome patients report they are more anxious and distressed than people who don't have the condition, and they are also more likely to suppress those emotions. In addition, when under stress, they show greater activation of the biological 'fight or flight' mechanism, which may add to their fatigue, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2016-05-17)

NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Iris now better organized
Satellite imagery showed that the former tropical cyclone known as Iris appeared better organized and more circular. (2018-04-11)

NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Dumazile sheared
Vertical wind shear is an adversary of tropical cyclones because it can blow them apart, and NASA's Aqua satellite found wind shear pushing Tropical Cyclone Dumazile's clouds south of its center. (2018-03-07)

Majority of Anna's hummingbirds may have feather mites on their tail feathers
The majority of Californian Anna's Hummingbirds appear to have P. huitzilopochtlii feather mites on their tail flight feathers, according to a study published Feb. 14, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Youki Yamasaki from Washington State University, US, and colleagues. (2018-02-14)

'Is there a doctor on board?' A guide to managing in-flight medical emergencies
A new article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides practical tips for physicians on airplanes who may step in to help in a medical emergency. (2018-02-26)

New scheduling model puts airlines on equal plane while easing congestion
New study demonstrates how air traffic congestion can be reduced through flight schedules without favoring certain airlines over others. (2018-03-27)

Teaching drones about the birds and the bees
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) of the future will be able to visually coordinate their flight and navigation just like birds and flying insects do, without needing human input, radar or even GPS satellite navigation. (2016-07-04)

NASA sees the end of ex-Tropical Cyclone 02W
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spotted the remnants of Tropical Cyclone 02W southeast of Taiwan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as the system was dissipating. (2017-04-20)

Physicians develop recommendations for managing in-flight medical emergencies
'Is there a doctor on board?' Hearing this call go out at 36,000 feet can be anxiety-provoking for any physician and may trigger a dilemma of whether to respond, or wait to see if anyone else will offer their expertise. That's why physicians at St. Michael's Hospital have developed practical recommendations for in-flight medical emergencies for healthcare professionals, published online today in the journal CMAJ. (2018-02-26)

New study is a step toward creating planes that travel at hypersonic speed
A recent study by researchers at NASA and Binghamton University, State University of New York, could lead to a drastic decrease in flight times. The study, funded in part by the U.S. Air Force, is one of the first steps toward the creation of planes able to move at hypersonic speeds, five to 10 times the speed of sound. (2017-10-10)

Fruit fly muscles with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation don't relax properly
Using fruit flies, Johns Hopkins researchers have figured out why a particular inherited human heart condition that is almost always due to genetic mutations causes the heart to enlarge, thicken and fail. They found that one such mutation interferes with heart muscle's ability to relax after contracting, and prevents the heart from fully filling with blood and pumping it out. (2017-10-09)

Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they exercise in space; findings may help others with fainting issues
Up to two hours of endurance and resistance exercises daily during a long space flight mission, combined with IV fluid replacement after landing, helps astronauts prevent dizziness and fainting during normal activity when they return to Earth. The study findings also have implications for a variety of people with health conditions that cause them to faint when standing up, and people on bed rest for long periods. (2019-07-19)

Radar tracking reveals how bees develop a route between flowers
As bees gain foraging experience they continually refine both the order in which they visit flowers and the flight paths they take between flowers to generate better and better routes, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London. (2017-12-11)

Could an anti-global warming atmospheric spraying program really work?
A program to reduce Earth's heat capture by injecting aerosols into the atmosphere from high-altitude aircraft is possible, but unreasonably costly with current technology, and would be unlikely to remain secret. Those are the key findings of new research published today in Environmental Research Letters, which looked at the capabilities and costs of various methods of delivering sulphates into the lower stratosphere, known as stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI). (2018-11-22)

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