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Popular Fly News and Current Events

Popular Fly News and Current Events, Fly News Articles.
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WSU researchers discover new clues on how sleep works in the brain
Star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes appear to play an essential role in sleep, a new study by scientists from the Washington State University Sleep and Performance Research Center confirms. (2018-10-31)
WSU researchers see human immune response in the fruit fly
Washington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. (2018-06-19)
Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)
WSU researchers use coal waste to create sustainable concrete
Washington State University researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation. (2018-07-12)
The evolution of Dark-fly
On Nov. 11, 1954, Syuiti Mori turned out the lights on a small group of fruit flies. (2016-02-04)
New study demonstrates importance of studying sleep and eating in tandem
A new study offers important insights into possible links between sleep and hunger. (2017-10-13)
Uncovering a reversible master switch for development
In a paper published in Genes & Development, BWH principal investigator Mitzi Kuroda, PhD, and her team identified a reversible 'master switch' on most developmental genes. (2017-11-13)
New study changes our view on flying insects
For the first time, researchers are able to prove that there is an optimal speed for certain insects when they fly. (2017-09-29)
Hundreds of fossilized eggs sheds light on pterosaur development
An invaluable collection of more than 200 eggs is providing new insights into the development and nesting habits of pterosaurs. (2017-11-30)
Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases
Northwestern University researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons. (2019-04-02)
New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
A new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. (2018-01-24)
Searching for shut eye: Penn study identifies possible sleep gene
While scientists and physicians know what happens if you don't get six to eight hours of shut-eye a night, investigators have long been puzzled about what controls the actual need for sleep. (2008-07-29)
Missing link shows bats flew first, developed echolocation later
The discovery of a remarkably well-preserved fossil representing the most primitive bat species known to date demonstrates that the animals evolved the ability to fly before they could echolocate. (2008-02-13)
Biology study suggests father's nutrition before sex could contribute to health of baby
Doctors long have stressed the importance of good nutrition for expectant mothers. (2017-10-12)
Even flies like a familiar song
The process that allows sounds experienced during infancy to shape language is poorly understood. (2018-03-20)
Vitamin K2: New hope for Parkinson's patients?
Neuroscientist Patrik Verstreken, associated with VIB and KU Leuven, succeeded in undoing the effect of one of the genetic defects that leads to Parkinson's using vitamin K2. (2012-05-11)
Early use of 'hurricane hunter' data improves hurricane intensity predictions
Data collected via airplane when a hurricane is developing can improve hurricane intensity predictions by up to 15 percent, according to Penn State researchers who have been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Hurricane Center to put the new technique into practice. (2016-05-25)
Low protein diet in early life increases lifespan in fruit flies
Fruit flies raised on a low protein diet early in life can live over twice as long as their peers. (2017-11-09)
Shifting protein networks in breast cancer may alter gene function
A given gene may perform a different function in breast cancer cells than in healthy cells due to changes in networks of interacting proteins, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-11-30)
Enzyme with surprising dual function
Scientists at the University of Bonn have clarified a surprising dual function of ceramide synthase. (2018-01-23)
Programming drones to fly in the face of uncertainty
MIT CSAIL system enables drones to fly through forests and avoid obstacles by harnessing uncertainty. (2018-02-12)
Flies' disease-carrying potential may be greater than thought, researchers say
Flies can be more than pesky picnic crashers, they may be potent pathogen carriers, too, according to an international team of researchers. (2017-11-24)
The flight speed of birds is more complex than previously thought
The flight speed of birds is more complex than research has previously managed to show. (2017-12-13)
CRISPR reveals the secret life of antimicrobial peptides
Using CRISPR, scientists at EPFL have carried out extensive work on a little-known yet effective weapon of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides. (2019-02-26)
Shift in bald eagle diet linked to sea otter decline
A newly published study has found that the decline of sea otters along Alaska's Aleutian Islands has forced a change in the diet of a terrestrial predator -- the bald eagle. (2008-10-03)
The humble fruit fly continues to boost biomedical discovery
Researchers have developed and made available a large versatile library of fruit flies that can be used to perform efficient and elegant in vivo gene-specific manipulations using the new protocol and gene-specific integration vector CRIMIC (CRISPR-Mediated Integrated Cassette). (2018-04-05)
Turning back the aging clock
By boosting genes that destroy defective mitochondrial DNA, researchers can slow down and potentially reverse an important part of the aging process. (2016-11-21)
UCI scientists identify hidden genetic variation that helps drive evolution
Identifying complex mutations in the structure of an organism's genome has been difficult. (2017-12-22)
To breed or not to breed? Migratory female butterflies face a monsoonal dilemma
Female butterflies make smart investments, finds a new study. (2017-10-03)
Lessons from the fly brain improve search algorithms
To develop better search algorithms for images and data, a group of researchers has turned to the fruit fly brain. (2017-11-09)
The love lives of fruit flies
New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance. (2018-07-13)
The hidden complexity underlying a common cause of autism
Genes located in a large chromosomal aberration associated with autism interact with each other to modulate the variable symptoms of the disease, according to new research. (2018-06-29)
Screw worm outbreak in Yemen
An outbreak of the insidious (2008-05-06)
Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system
A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development. (2019-04-18)
New research challenges long-held assumptions of flightless bird evolution
Large flightless birds of the southern continents -- African ostriches, Australian emus and cassowaries, South American rheas and the New Zealand kiwi -- do not share a common flightless ancestor as once believed. (2008-09-03)
A bee's future as queen or worker may rest with parasitic fly
Strange things are happening in the lowland tropical forests of Panama and Costa Rica. (2008-07-28)
High-flying ducks cross Himalayas
A high-flying duck species reaches altitudes of up to 6,800 meters (22,000 feet) to cross the Himalayas, new research shows. (2017-09-05)
Men may contribute to infertility through newly discovered part of sperm
The research identifies a new structure in human sperm that functions in the zygote and may provide new avenues for addressing male infertility and insights into early embryo developmental defects. (2018-06-07)
Unpacking asymmetric cell division
Scientists found a new role for a PITP protein called Vibrator, which along with PI4KIIIα, play important roles in asymmetric division, which may play a role in tumor formation or neurodevelopmental disorders. (2018-02-27)
Insect eyes inspire new solar cell design from Stanford
Packing tiny solar cells together, like micro-lenses in the compound eye of an insect, could help scientists overcome a major roadblock to the development of perovskite photovoltaics. (2017-08-31)
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