Popular Food Allergies News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Food Allergies News and Current Events, Food Allergies News Articles.
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Research improves food bank effectiveness, equity
Researchers have developed computer models to improve the ability of food banks to feed as many people as possible, as equitably as possible, while reducing food waste. (2018-02-27)

How cats and dogs are consuming and processing parabens
Many households can claim at least one four-legged friend as part of the family. But pets that primarily stay indoors can have increased rates of diseases, such as diabetes, kidney diseases and hypothyroidism compared with those that stay exclusively outside. Some scientists propose that chemical substances in the home could contribute to these illnesses. One group has examined how pets could be exposed to parabens, as reported in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2018-03-07)

Kids persistently allergic to cow's milk are smaller than peers with nut allergies
Children who experience persistent allergies to cow's milk may remain shorter and lighter throughout pre-adolescence when compared with children who are allergic to peanuts or tree nuts, according to a retrospective chart review. (2018-03-03)

Climate change could raise food insecurity risk
Weather extremes caused by climate change could raise the risk of food shortages in many countries, new research suggests. (2018-04-01)

Dental checklist of bad practice has patient care at its heart
Dental experts have drawn up a definitive list of never events -- scenarios that patients should never face -- in a bid to ensure excellent patient care worldwide. (2018-05-11)

School lunch decisions made by the child and not the parent
While school lunches in the UK are subject to food standards, the contents of packed lunches are not as closely scrutinized, and studies have raised concern regarding the nutritional quality of packed lunches. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that children, not their parents, are often the primary decision maker of whether they will eat a school lunch or what is packed for their lunch. (2018-04-06)

Children bear the brunt of secondhand smoke in Bangladesh
Children in Bangladesh are being exposed to high levels of secondhand smoke despite laws banning smoking in public spaces, a study carried out by the University of York suggests. (2017-12-08)

Scientists find brain mechanism that naturally combats overeating
Studying a brain region involved in memory, researchers discovered a set of neurons that help mice control their appetite. (2019-03-28)

Logo recognition associated with kids' choice of international junk foods
Young children in six low- and middle-income countries prefer junk foods over traditional and home cooked meals, according to a new University of Maryland School of Public Health study. Researchers investigated the links between marketing and media exposure and the preference for fast food in Brazil, China, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Russia. Kids who easily identified the logos of international brands were more likely to request and prefer the processed foods of low nutrition. (2018-03-06)

Newly found immune defence could pave way to treat allergies
Scientists have made a fundamental discovery about how our body's immune system clears harmful infections. (2017-11-16)

Here's how stress may be making you sick
A Michigan State University researcher is providing new insight into how certain types of stress interact with immune cells and can regulate how these cells respond to allergens, ultimately causing physical symptoms and disease. (2018-01-10)

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK. (2018-01-15)

There can be no sustainable development without profound changes in food systems
An international group of experts, including researchers from CIRAD, is calling for profound changes in food systems in order to meet the sustainable development goals (SDGs) set by the UN in 2015, and the terms of the Paris Agreement on climate. The authors propose a four-pillar strategy. (2018-08-09)

Study: Suburban ponds are a septic buffet
A new study shows that human waste accounts for a high percentage of nutrients consumed by some animals and plants in suburban ponds. Researchers at Yale University and Portland State University found that residential, suburban land use is altering the dynamics of the food chain, as well as where nutrients originate and how they move through pond ecosystems. (2017-12-12)

New technology for enzyme design
Scientists at the University of Würzburg have chemically modified the enzyme levansucrase using a new method. The enzyme can now produce sugar polymers that are exciting for applications in the food industry and medicine. (2018-06-01)

Extending food safety training to other countries could save live
Food safety practices that Americans take for granted -- washing hands with soap, refrigeration, and not cutting raw meat and vegetables on the same surface without disinfection -- are not widely practiced in other places around the world, and researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences want to change that. (2017-12-15)

Study of brain activity shows that food commercials influence children's food choices
Food advertising is a multi-billion dollar industry, with approximately $1.8 billion annually aimed at children and adolescents, who view 1,000-2,000 ads per year. Some studies have shown there is a relationship between receptivity to food commercials and amount and type of food consumed. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers studied the brain activity of children after watching food commercials and found that the commercials influence children's food choices and brain activity. (2016-08-12)

Food waste: The biggest loss could be what you choose to put in your mouth
In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), USA, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and their colleagues have now found a novel way to define and quantify this second type of wastage. The scientists have called it 'opportunity food loss,' a term inspired by the 'opportunity cost' concept in economics, which refers to the cost of choosing a particular alternative over better options. (2018-03-26)

Young athletes interested in healthy protein, not French fries
The greasy food being served at hockey rinks isn't really what young hockey players want, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-04-23)

Adolescents with hay fever have higher rates of anxiety and depression
An article published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows allergies can have serious, far-reaching consequences, especially on adolescent sufferers. (2018-05-24)

Gene therapy could 'turn off' severe allergies
A single treatment giving life-long protection from severe allergies such as asthma could be made possible by immunology research at The University of Queensland. (2017-06-02)

Omalizumab improves efficacy of oral immunotherapy for multiple food allergies
Combining a 16-week initial course of the medication omalizumab with oral immunotherapy (OIT) greatly improves the efficacy of OIT for children with allergies to multiple foods, new clinical trial findings show. After 36 weeks, more than 80 percent of children who received omalizumab and OIT could safely consume two-gram portions of at least two foods to which they were allergic, compared with only a third of children who received placebo and OIT. (2017-12-11)

Food abundance driving conflict in Africa, not food scarcity
In Africa, food abundance may be driving violent conflict rather than food scarcity, according to a study published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, a publication of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association. The study refutes the notion that climate change will increase the frequency of civil war in Africa as a result of food scarcity triggered by rising temperatures and drought. (2018-03-01)

Understanding the power of honey through its proteins
Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world. Humans have used honey throughout history, and its long shelf life and medicinal properties make it a unique, multipurpose natural product. Although it seems that a lot is known about the sweet substance, surprisingly little is known about its proteins. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Natural Products new data on honey proteins that could lead to new medicinal applications. (2019-05-08)

Nutrition labels on dining hall food: Are they being used? By who?
University of Illinois dining halls voluntarily label foods with nutrition information. Although 45 percent of students noticed the labels, only 20 percent used the labels to make food choices. Students who practice health-promoting behaviors like tracking what they eat or exercising frequently are most likely to use nutrition information on food items in the dining hall. (2016-06-29)

Food cue-related brain activity linked to obesity?
A unique pattern of gene expression observed in rats may be linked to a conditioned desire for food and excessive food intake, an article published today in BMC Biology suggests. (2007-04-26)

Turning off asthma attacks
Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular 'off' switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks. The switch, they say, is composed of regulatory proteins that control an immune signaling pathway in cells. (2016-12-02)

Milk allergy affects half of US food-allergic kids under age 1
New research found that over two percent of all US children under the age of 5 have a milk allergy, and 53 percent of food-allergic infants under age 1 have a cow's milk allergy. (2018-11-16)

Scientists develop a new test to safely and accurately diagnose peanut allergies
Scientists have developed a new laboratory test to diagnose peanut allergy. The test has 98 percent specificity and, unlike current options, it doesn't run the risk of false-positives or causing allergic reactions such as anaphylactic shock. (2018-05-03)

White blood cells related to allergies may also be harnessed to destroy cancer cells
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that white blood cells which are responsible for chronic asthma and modern allergies may be used to eliminate malignant colon cancer cells. (2019-01-22)

Flour power to boost food security
A glue-like protein that holds the wheat grain together could hold the secret for yielding more, and healthier, flour from wheat. (2017-10-31)

UC Davis hosts the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference
The University of California, Davis, will host the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference on March 20-22, 2013. Co-organized by UC Davis and the World Bank, the conference will focus on science-based actions that can provide resilience for food systems despite the future uncertainty of climate change and extreme events. (2013-02-19)

Eczema plus family history can mean a longer hospital stay for kids with asthma
Research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's Annual Scientific Meeting examines the relationship between medical history and allergic reactions in children, and how long they stayed in the hospital after an asthma attack. (2017-10-27)

National school lunch program aces safety test
The National School Lunch Program's (NSLP) strict safety standards work, according to a new University of Connecticut study that found food safety standards for ground beef supplied to the program are highly effective in keeping harmful bacteria out of school lunches nationwide. However, ground beef that fails NSLP inspection can be sold to other vendors, eventually making its way onto consumers' plates, meaning ground beef sold to schools may be the safest on the market. (2018-01-19)

Folic acid late in pregnancy may increase childhood allergy risk
Research from the University of Adelaide suggests that taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in children affected by growth restriction during pregnancy. (2017-12-22)

Dolphin diets suggest extreme changes in the ocean may shorten food chains
Extreme marine conditions like El Niño are associated with shorter food chain length in the California Current ecosystem, a new analysis reports. The finding counters previous evidence for long-term stability and ecosystem resilience in nitrogen cycling and food web structure off the (2017-10-18)

Reducing peanut allergy risks in children -- The Nurse Practitioner presents update
New prevention and treatment approaches can reduce serious health risks due to peanut allergy in children, according to an article in the March issue of The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-02-15)

Food insecurity screening works, but social stigma stands in its way
Screening for food insecurity is effective, a Drexel study found, but red tape and fears of being declared unfit parents often keep help from coming. (2018-02-27)

Influence of C-section, formula feeding and antibiotics on infant gut microbiome
Researchers characterize the combined influence of cesarean delivery, antibiotic treatment, and formula feeding on the development of gut microbiota in infants. (2017-09-26)

New MRI tech could help doctors detect heart disease with better accuracy
Doctors might be able to better detect any disease or disorder that involves inflammation thanks to a new MRI imaging technology co-developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-12-13)

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