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Popular Fossil Record News and Current Events, Fossil Record News Articles.
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Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. (2019-06-20)
Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. (2019-01-16)
Crocodile face off
Despite often being portrayed as creatures that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years, a new Harvard study shows crocodiles have repeatedly altered their developmental patterns, leading to much of the diversity found in modern, living crocodiles. (2019-02-20)
What did Earth's ancient magnetic field look like?
New work from Carnegie's Peter Driscoll suggests Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. (2016-06-24)
Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)
Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)
New species of ancient whale identified and named by Otago paleontologists
University of Otago paleontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of baleen whale, alive more than 27.5 million years ago and found in the Hakataramea Valley, South Canterbury. (2018-04-18)
New screening tool can improve the quality of life for epilepsy patients with sleep apnea
Rutgers researchers have developed a tool to help neurologists screen for obstructive sleep apnea in people with epilepsy whose seizures can be magnified by sleep disorders. (2018-09-27)
Celebrity fossil reveals all for science
With the help of an artist, a geology professor at Lund University in Sweden has figuratively speaking breathed life into one of science's most well-known fossil species; Agnostus pisiformis. (2017-09-15)
A look into the evolution of the eye
A team of researchers, among them a zoologist from the University of Cologne, has succeeded in reconstructing a 160 million year old compound eye of a fossil crustacean found in southeastern France visible. (2016-01-26)
Paleontology: The eleventh Archaeopteryx
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives. (2018-01-26)
Record high CO2 emissions delay global peak
Global carbon emissions are on the rise again in 2017 after three years of little to no growth, according to University of East Anglia researcher. (2017-11-13)
Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming, 26-year study projects
After 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. (2017-10-05)
New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals
A new set of principles are needed to address the moral challenge of climate change. (2018-01-04)
Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on record
Sea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA. (2018-03-23)
Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutral
A return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. (2018-03-22)
Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate model
Researchers from Princeton University and NOAA report in the journal Nature Climate Change that extreme cyclones that formed in the Arabian Sea for the first time in 2014 are the result of global warming and will likely increase in frequency. (2017-12-06)
Evolution: The beneficiaries of mass extinction
Mass extinctions were followed by periods of low diversity in which certain new species dominated wide regions of the supercontinent Pangaea, reports a new study. (2017-10-10)
Russian scientists developed a new technology of energy generation from bituminous coal
A team from Ural Federal University (UrFU) developed a new efficient technology of electrical power generation from bituminous coal. (2017-12-15)
Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. (2016-02-17)
Novel experiment documents evolution of genome in near-real time
UCSD bioengineers report in the November issue of Nature Genetics rapid evolutionary changes in a bacterial genome, observed in near-real time over a few days. (2006-11-05)
Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea
Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water. (2017-12-06)
When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research. (2018-02-04)
My, what big teeth you had! Extinct species had large teeth on roof of mouth
Paleontologists have found a previously unknown amphibious predator that probably made the Antarctica of 240 million years ago something less than a hospitable place. (2008-09-11)
Research gives new ray of hope for solar fuel
The quest to develop the 'Holy Grail' of affordable, viable and environmentally-friendly fuels using sunlight has taken an exciting new twist. (2018-04-27)
Brexit is one of the greatest threats to women's rights
Brexit is one the greatest threats to women's rights and social inclusion, a new study in the Journal of Social Policy and Society reports. (2018-01-25)
Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs
A project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago. (2018-03-28)
The curse of zombie fossils
Palaeontologists investigate the macabre science behind how animals decay and fossilize. (2018-03-21)
Coal phase-out: Announcing CO2-pricing triggers divestment
Putting the Paris climate agreement into practice will trigger opposed reactions by investors on the one hand and fossil fuel owners on the other hand. (2018-01-29)
Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to UCLA invention
UCLA researchers have designed a new device that can inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy and create hydrogen fuel, and that needs only sunlight to operate. (2017-11-20)
Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years ago
A discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution. (2018-06-19)
Litte Foot takes a bow
Little Foot is the only known virtually complete Australopithecus fossil discovered to date. (2017-12-06)
New Egyptian dinosaur reveals ancient link between Africa and Europe
When it comes to the final days of the dinosaurs, Africa is something of a blank page. (2018-01-29)
New ichthyosaur species, long gone, found in a storeroom
A new species of ichthyosaur has been identified from a fossil that has been in the University of Nottingham's engineering collection for over half a century. (2017-10-10)
Step towards better 'beyond lithium' batteries
A step towards new 'beyond lithium' rechargeable batteries with superior performance has been made by researchers at the University of Bath. (2017-09-18)
Missing link shows bats flew first, developed echolocation later
The discovery of a remarkably well-preserved fossil representing the most primitive bat species known to date demonstrates that the animals evolved the ability to fly before they could echolocate. (2008-02-13)
New study sheds light on Moon's slow retreat from frozen Earth
A study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers provides new insight into the Moon's excessive equatorial bulge, a feature that solidified in place over four billion years ago as the Moon gradually distanced itself from the Earth. (2018-02-06)
Are palaeontologists naming too many species?
A comprehensive new study looking at variations in Ichthyosaurus, a common British Jurassic ichthyosaur (sea-going reptile) also known as 'Sea Dragons', has provided important information into recognizing new fossil species. (2018-03-14)
New record set for carbon-carbon single bond length
A stable organic compound has been synthesized with a record length for the bond between its carbon atoms, exceeding the assumed limit. (2018-03-08)
Researchers uncover world's oldest fossil impression of a flying insect
While paleontologists may scour remote, exotic places in search of prehistoric specimens, Tufts researchers have found what they believe to be the world's oldest whole-body fossil impression of a flying insect in a wooded field behind a strip mall in North Attleboro, Mass. (2008-10-14)
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