Popular Fossil News and Current Events

Popular Fossil News and Current Events, Fossil News Articles.
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Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were hungry. (2019-06-20)

Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils discovered by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg in conjunction with researchers at La Trobe University in Melbourne prove that coralline red algae existed as far back as 430 million years ago. (2019-01-16)

Searching for water
What does the presence of 1,000 year old water mean for the future of water supplies under the desert regions of Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Jordan, Oman, Yemen and the United Arab Emirates? New research has sought to identify how much good water is available in the Arabian Peninsula, where water is stored in what are known as 'fossil aquifers.' (2019-10-15)

Hi-tech scans catch prehistoric mite hitching ride on spider
Scientists have produced amazing three-dimensional images of a prehistoric mite as it hitched a ride on the back of a 50 million-year-old spider. (2011-11-08)

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)

Record high CO2 emissions delay global peak
Global carbon emissions are on the rise again in 2017 after three years of little to no growth, according to University of East Anglia researcher. Global emissions from all human activities will reach 41 billion tonnes in 2017, following a projected 2 percent rise in burning fossil fuels. It was hoped that emissions might soon reach their peak after three stable years, so this is unwelcome news for those at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 23), Bonn. (2017-11-13)

A look into the evolution of the eye
A team of researchers, among them a zoologist from the University of Cologne, has succeeded in reconstructing a 160 million year old compound eye of a fossil crustacean found in southeastern France visible. With the reconstruction of the eye, the scientists succeeded in making the structure of soft tissue visible -- which was long considered to be impossible. (2016-01-26)

New species of ancient whale identified and named by Otago paleontologists
University of Otago paleontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of baleen whale, alive more than 27.5 million years ago and found in the Hakataramea Valley, South Canterbury. (2018-04-18)

Celebrity fossil reveals all for science
With the help of an artist, a geology professor at Lund University in Sweden has figuratively speaking breathed life into one of science's most well-known fossil species; Agnostus pisiformis. The trilobite-like arthropod lived in huge numbers in Scandinavia a half-billion years ago. Today, this extinct species provides important clues for science in several ways. (2017-09-15)

Paleontology: The eleventh Archaeopteryx
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives. (2018-01-26)

Paleontology: Experiments in evolution
A new find from Patagonia sheds light on the evolution of large predatory dinosaurs. Features of the 8-m long specimen from the Middle Jurassic suggest that it records a phase of rapid diversification and evolutionary experimentation. (2019-12-11)

New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals
A new set of principles are needed to address the moral challenge of climate change. These principles, developed by a team of researchers at the Oxford Martin School, and published this week in Nature Climate Change, are a set of scientifically-grounded tools for the use of both investors and companies to assess corporate strategy against climate change. (2018-01-04)

Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming, 26-year study projects
After 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. The study, led by Jerry Melillo of the Marine Biological Laboratory, indicates that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncontrollable carbon feedback will occur between forest soils and the climate system, accelerating global warming. (2017-10-05)

Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)

Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. The focus of this technology is on the large-scale reduction of carbon emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants. Research published in the International Journal of Decision Support Systems investigates the pros and cons, assesses the risks associated with carbon capture and provides a new framework for assessing the necessary technology. (2016-02-17)

The curse of zombie fossils
Palaeontologists investigate the macabre science behind how animals decay and fossilize. (2018-03-21)

Research gives new ray of hope for solar fuel
The quest to develop the 'Holy Grail' of affordable, viable and environmentally-friendly fuels using sunlight has taken an exciting new twist. (2018-04-27)

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performance
Researchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries. (2018-06-20)

Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study (2019-07-12)

Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutral
A return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. So reports William Schlesinger, President Emeritus of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, in an Insights article published today in the journal Science. (2018-03-22)

Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs
A project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago. (2018-03-28)

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica
Scientists have discovered the fossils of an iguana-sized reptile, which they named 'Antarctic king,' that lived at the South Pole 250 million years ago (it used to be warmer). Antarctanax was an early cousin of the dinosaurs, and it shows how life bounced back after the world's biggest mass extinction. (2019-01-31)

Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea
Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water. (2017-12-06)

New ichthyosaur species, long gone, found in a storeroom
A new species of ichthyosaur has been identified from a fossil that has been in the University of Nottingham's engineering collection for over half a century. (2017-10-10)

When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research. (2018-02-04)

Prehistoric squid was last meal of newborn ichthyosaur 200 million years ago
Scientists from the UK have identified the smallest and youngest specimen of Ichthyosaurus communis on record and found an additional surprise preserved in its stomach. (2017-10-03)

Strange 'nude' fossil creature from half a billion years ago
A discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution. (2018-06-19)

Amazon rainforest losses impact on climate change, study shows
Human activity has removed more than one-tenth of trees and plants from the Amazon rainforest since the 1960s, a study shows. (2015-04-21)

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution
A remarkable 250-million-year-old 'terrible-headed lizard' fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother -- clear evidence for live birth. Head of The University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and co-author Professor Jonathan Aitchison said the fossil unexpectedly provided the first evidence for live birth in an animal group previously thought to exclusively lay eggs. (2017-02-14)

Calculating the CO2 emissions of biofuels is not enough
A new EU regulation aims to shrink the environmental footprint of biofuels starting in 2021. But an EPFL scientist thinks we should go one step further and take into account all compounds produced at biorefineries, not just biofuel. And he has developed a model for doing just that. (2018-01-29)

My, what big teeth you had! Extinct species had large teeth on roof of mouth
Paleontologists have found a previously unknown amphibious predator that probably made the Antarctica of 240 million years ago something less than a hospitable place. (2008-09-11)

Manure could heat your home
Farm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. (2018-03-08)

New study sheds light on Moon's slow retreat from frozen Earth
A study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers provides new insight into the Moon's excessive equatorial bulge, a feature that solidified in place over four billion years ago as the Moon gradually distanced itself from the Earth. (2018-02-06)

Biofuels: An advisable strategy?
Biofuels have been an increasingly hot topic on the discussion table in the last few years. The main argument behind the policies in favour of biofuels is based on the idea that biofuels would not increase the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. However, a more careful analysis of the life cycle of biodiesel reveals that the energy (and CO2) savings is not so high as it might even be negative. (2007-03-07)

Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to UCLA invention
UCLA researchers have designed a new device that can inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy and create hydrogen fuel, and that needs only sunlight to operate. (2017-11-20)

Walker receives Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award
Alan Walker, Evan Pugh Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Biology was awarded the Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017 by the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. (2017-01-24)

Coal phase-out: Announcing CO2-pricing triggers divestment
Putting the Paris climate agreement into practice will trigger opposed reactions by investors on the one hand and fossil fuel owners on the other hand. A new study now finds that on balance, divestment beats the so-called 'green paradox' if substantial carbon pricing is credibly announced. Consequently, overall CO2 emissions would be effectively reduced. (2018-01-29)

Breaking the chain: Catalyzing a green future for chemistry
Osaka University researchers create catalyst for refining chemicals in plant waste, allowing a green way to produce valuable raw materials. (2017-11-06)

Acid rain has a disproportionate impact on coastal waters
The release of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere by power plants and agricultural activities plays a minor role in making the ocean more acidic on a global scale, but the impact is greatly amplified in the shallower waters of the coastal ocean, according to new research by atmospheric and marine chemists. (2007-09-07)

Are palaeontologists naming too many species?
A comprehensive new study looking at variations in Ichthyosaurus, a common British Jurassic ichthyosaur (sea-going reptile) also known as 'Sea Dragons', has provided important information into recognizing new fossil species. (2018-03-14)

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