Popular Fracking News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Fracking News and Current Events, Fracking News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 7 | 245 Results
EARTH: Is there really a minerals crisis?
China sent the high-tech industry and markets reeling when it blocked exports of raw rare earth minerals. The sudden severing of rare earths supply was a frightening prospect as the minerals are key ingredients in high-tech products. Governments around the world saw the ban as a kind of wake-up call and started looking at ways to develop their own mineral resources -- for rare earths as well as basic industry metals like copper and zinc. (2011-07-11)

Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks. (2020-04-27)

Proximity to fracking sites affects public support of them, study finds
People who live closer to fracking sites are more familiar with and more supportive of hydraulic fracturing, while those who live in proximity to areas of higher oil and gas well density are more familiar with but not necessarily more supportive of the practice. (2018-04-30)

Deep down fracking wells, microbial communities thrive
Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells. New finding help scientists understand what is happening inside fracking wells and could offer insight into processes such as corrosion and methane production. (2016-10-25)

A new model for capillary rise in nano-channels offers insights into fracking
With fracking, scientists have calculated the expected level of capillary rise with the Lucas-Washburn equation, a mathematical model whose earliest parameters were first devised nearly a century ago. The challenge, however, is that that the equation has not been completely accurate in predicting the actual rise observed in nano-capillary laboratory experiments. Researchers studying this deviation describe their findings this week in the journal Applied Physics Letters. (2017-03-21)

Study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies
Researchers from USC and UCLA have found that exposure to flaring -- the burning off of excess natural gas -- at oil and gas production sites is associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth, compared with no exposure. (2020-07-15)

Replacing coal with gas or renewables saves billions of gallons of water
The transition from coal to natural gas in the US electricity sector is reducing the industry's water use, Duke University research finds. For every megawatt of electricity produced using natural gas instead of coal, the water withdrawn from rivers and groundwater drops by 10,500 gallons, and water consumed for cooling and other plant operations and not returned to the environment drops by 260 gallons. Switching to solar or wind power could boost these savings even more. (2019-10-21)

Release of treated wastewater from hydraulic fracturing contaminates lake
Hydraulic fracturing has enabled a domestic oil and gas boom in the US, but its rapid growth has raised questions about what to do with the billions of gallons of wastewater that result. Researchers now report that treating the wastewater and releasing it into surface waters has led to the contamination of a Pennsylvania watershed with radioactive material and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The study appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2017-07-12)

Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada
Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada. (2019-05-23)

Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy
A new study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy. Results appear in the journal Environmental Research. (2019-07-24)

Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out
Since fracking sites use a diverse mix of chemical ingredients, often individuals and researchers are in the dark about the health consequences of living near a particular well. Now, a new, interactive tool created by Penn Medicine researchers allows community members and scientists to find out which toxins may be lurking in their drinking water. (2020-09-22)

Methane-producing microbial communities found in fracking wells
New research has uncovered the genetic details of microbes found in fracking wells. Not only do a wide array of bacteria and viruses thrive in these crevices created by hydraulic fracturing - they also have the power to produce methane, according to a study led by scientists at The Ohio State University and published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2018-06-25)

A steady increase in the water footprint at US fracking sites
Water use for hydraulic fracturing (commonly referred to as 'fracking') in the US has been increasing at individual facilities in recent years, even as unconventional oil and gas production has more broadly declined, a new study reports. The findings emphasize the importance of water management at fracking operations, particularly if the prices of oil and natural (2018-08-15)

Societal values and perceptions shape energy production and use as much as new technology
Societal values and perceptions have shaped the energy landscape as much as the technologies that drive its production and consumption, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. (2019-05-28)

Acid mine drainage reduces radioactivity in fracking waste
Blending fracking wastewater with acid mine drainage causes most of the naturally radioactive metals in the fracking water to precipitate into a solid for disposal. The practice also could help reduce the depletion of local freshwater resources by giving drillers a source of usable recycled water for the hydraulic fracturing process. (2014-01-09)

Changes in mouse breast tissue after exposure to fracking chemicals
In a new study the authors believe is the first of its kind, environmental scientists led by Laura Vandenberg at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they observed changes in mammary gland development of female mice exposed during early development to the chemicals used in unconventional oil and gas (UOG) extraction -- including fracking -- at levels environmentally relevant to humans. (2018-02-07)

Conflicting views on social media balanced by an algorithm
Researchers from Aalto University and University of Rome Tor Vergata have designed an algorithm that is able to balance the information exposure so that social media users can be exposed to information from both sides of the discussion. (2017-12-05)

Modeling the effects of wastewater injection
Combining computer modeling, fracture mechanics theory, and real-world observations, scientists create a model for the maximum magnitude of an earthquake that can be caused through wastewater injection. (2017-12-20)

Bradford Co. water quality improves; impacts rare near shale gas wells
A new study of groundwater in a rural Pennsylvania county shows only rare instances of possible gas contamination amid an overall trend of improving water quality despite heavy Marcellus Shale development. (2018-06-12)

Humans have been causing earthquakes in Texas since the 1920s
Earthquakes triggered by human activity have been happening in Texas since at least 1925, and they have been widespread throughout the state ever since, according to a new historical review of the evidence published online May 18 in Seismological Research Letters. (2016-05-17)

Silicosis is on the rise, but is there a therapeutic target?
Researchers from the CNRS, the University of Orléans, and the company Artimmune, in collaboration with Turkish clinicians from Atatürk University, have identified a key mechanism of lung inflammation induced by silica exposure, which leads to silicosis, an incurable disease. Their study in mice and patients, published in Nature Communications, shows that this inflammation can be prevented by extracellular DNA degradation, suggesting a new therapeutic target. (2018-12-06)

Opinions on fracking linked to political persuasion, says new study
A person's opinion on fracking can be predicted by their political ideology, according to a new study co-conducted by Plymouth University. (2016-05-09)

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels' shells
Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites, according to researchers from Penn State and Union College. (2018-10-22)

Fracking plays active role in generating toxic metal wastewater, Dartmouth study finds
The production of hazardous wastewater in hydraulic fracturing is assumed to be partly due to chemicals introduced into injected freshwater when it mixes with highly saline brine naturally present in the rock. But a Dartmouth study investigating the toxic metal barium in fracking wastewater finds that chemical reactions between injected freshwater and the fractured shale itself could play a major role. (2015-12-15)

Ground and stream water clues reveal shale drilling impacts
Chemical clues in waters near Marcellus Shale gas wells in rural Pennsylvania can identify new drilling-related sources of methane contamination, according to scientists. (2018-11-19)

Very little public support for relaxing rules and regulations around fracking
A major new public attitudes survey on fracking reveals very little public support for relaxing the rules and regulations around fracking -- a key demand of major shale gas extraction companies. (2019-08-01)

Hazardous chemicals go unregulated in routine oil and gas operations
California requires oil and gas producers to disclose chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing activities, enabling scientific and public scrutiny of potential environmental and human health hazards. But all existing disclosure regulations cover chemical use only in hydraulic fracturing, and, in California, two other types of well-stimulation treatments. Many of the same chemicals used for hydraulic fracturing go undisclosed when used in routine oil- and gas-field activities such as well drilling, cleaning and maintenance. (2017-04-19)

Wastewater leak in West Texas revealed
Geophysicists at SMU say that evidence of leak occurring in a West Texas wastewater disposal well between 2007 and 2011 should raise concerns about the current potential for contaminated groundwater and damage to surrounding infrastructure. (2019-11-25)

UTA study finds air contamination near fracking sites result of operational inefficiencies
Chemists at the University of Texas at Arlington have published a new study that indicates that highly variable contamination events registered in and around unconventional oil and gas developments are the result of operational inefficiencies and not inherent to the extraction process itself. (2016-08-26)

Water use for fracking has risen by up to 770 percent since 2011
The amount of water used per well for fracking surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major US shale gas- and oil-producing regions, a Duke University study finds. The volume of flowback and produced water that new wells generated during their first year of operation also increased by up to 1,440 percent. If this rapid intensification continues, fracking's water footprint could grow by up to 50-fold by the year 2030. (2018-08-15)

UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. (2019-06-18)

Damaging Sichuan earthquakes linked to fracking operations
Two moderate-sized earthquakes that struck the southern Sichuan Province of China last December and January were probably caused by nearby fracking operations, according to a new study published in Seismological Research Letters. (2019-04-04)

Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface. (2020-10-07)

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters
Wastewater from oil and gas operations -- including fracking for shale gas -- at a West Virginia site altered microbes downstream, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study, published recently in Science of the Total Environment, showed that wastewater releases, including briny water that contained petroleum and other pollutants, altered the diversity, numbers and functions of microbes. The shifts in the microbial community indicated changes in their respiration and nutrient cycling, along with signs of stress. (2017-02-23)

Shale gas development in PA increases exposure of some to air pollutants
Air pollution levels may have exceeded air quality standards during the development of some Marcellus Shale natural gas wells in Pennsylvania, potentially impacting more than 36,000 people in one year alone during the drilling boom, according to Penn State scientists. (2021-02-18)

First coast-to-coast land motion map of Scotland derived from satellite radar images
Using hundreds of satellite radar images the team, working with Geomatic Ventures Limited (GVL), an innovative University spin-out company, created a complete map of mainland Scotland. (2017-11-07)

Hydro-fracking: Fact vs. fiction
In communities across the US, people are hearing more and more about a controversial oil and gas extraction technique called hydraulic fracturing - aka, hydro-fracking. Controversies pivot on some basic questions: Can hydro-fracking contaminate domestic wells? Does it cause earthquakes? How can we know? What can be done about these things if they are true? A wide range of researchers will address these and related critical questions at the GSA Annual Meeting this week. (2012-11-05)

Fracking chemicals disrupt hormone function
A controversial oil and natural gas drilling technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, uses many chemicals that can disrupt the body's hormones, according to new research accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrinology. (2013-12-16)

Support for fracking is at an all-time low, says new survey
As the government gives the go-ahead to resume fracking in the UK, a new survey from The University of Nottingham has shown that public support for the extraction and use of shale gas has fallen from over 58 percent in July 2013 to just over 37 percent in October 2016. (2016-10-13)

How to avoid water wars between 'fracking' industry and residents
The shale gas boom has transformed the energy landscape in the US, but in some drier locations, it could cause conflict among the energy industry, residents and agricultural interests over already-scarce water resources, say researchers. They add that degraded water quality is a potential risk unless there are adequate safeguards. The feature article appears in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2014-04-23)

Page 2 of 7 | 245 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.