Popular Fresh Produce News and Current Events

Popular Fresh Produce News and Current Events, Fresh Produce News Articles.
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Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

UTA expands efforts to develop water recycling technologies
The Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation at the University of Texas at Arlington has expanded its partnership with oil field equipment supplier Challenger Water Solutions to develop water recycling technologies that will transform waste from unconventional oil and gas development into reusable water. (2018-04-18)

Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomes: Otago research
University of Otago researchers have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables. (2018-04-15)

Grandmother, what bad eyes you have!
Senior citizens living in retirement homes often lack adequate ophthalmological care, according to a study by Luisa Thederan and co-authors published in the current issue of Deutsches Ă„rzteblatt International. Almost 21 percent of the surveyed residents were last seen by an ophthalmologist more than five years ago, while 39.9 percent were unable to provide any information about past ophthalmological examinations. (2016-05-31)

Why keep the raw data?
The increasingly popular subject of raw diffraction data deposition is examined in a Topical Review in IUCrJ. (2016-12-07)

Making sense of diabetes
Throughout her 38-year nursing career, Laurel Despins has progressed from a bedside nurse to a clinical nurse specialist and has worked in medical, surgical and cardiac intensive care units. She noticed diabetes is rarely referred to as a primary cause of death in itself, yet the disease is a leading contributor to deaths involving heart disease, stroke and cancer. (2020-09-21)

New study finds adult fresh pear consumers had a lower body weight than non-pear consumers
The epidemiologic study, led by Carol O'Neil of the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, used a nationally representative analytic sample to examine the association of fresh pear consumption with nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and cardiovascular risk factors in adults. (2015-12-08)

People waste nearly a pound of food daily
Americans waste nearly a pound of food per person each day, but the exact amount of food we trash differs by how healthy your diet is, a new PLOS ONE study finds. Between 2007-2014, consumers wasted nearly 150,000 tons of food per day. Researchers estimate that food waste corresponded with the use of 30 million acres of land (7 percent of total US cropland) and 4.2 trillion gallons of water annually. Higher quality diets were associated with higher levels of food waste. (2018-04-18)

Wireless food stamp transactions tied to healthier shopping
New research links the equipping of mobile fruit and vegetable stands with wireless banking devices programmed to accept food stamps to the buying of more healthy foods by people with low incomes. (2017-09-18)

Money, not access, key to resident food choices in 'food deserts'
A new study finds that, while access to healthy foods is a significant challenge, the biggest variable limiting diet choices in so-called 'food deserts' is limited financial resources. (2017-03-14)

Global warming will accelerate water cycle over global land monsoon regions
A new study provides a broader understanding on the redistribution of freshwater resources across the globe induced by future changes in the monsoon system. (2019-07-23)

Montana State University researchers publish study
'Fruit and vegetable desirability is lower in more rural built food environments of Montana, USA using the Produce Desirability(ProDes) Tool' was published in the journal Food Security. (2018-03-23)

Parasite study paves way for therapies to tackle deadly infections
New understanding of a parasite that causes a million cases of disease each year could point towards effective drug treatments. (2017-10-10)

Eating your veggies, even in space
Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food. The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) is creating the planters for cultivating veggies in space. Now that researchers have finished lettuce-growing experiments, they'll be embarking on bean trials. (2019-01-04)

Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubes
At just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals. (2017-08-24)

Measure of age in soil nitrogen could help precision agriculture
What's good for crops is not always good for the environment. Nitrogen, a key nutrient for plants, can cause problems when it leaches into water supplies. University of Illinois engineers developed a model to calculate the age of nitrogen in corn and soybean fields, which could lead to improved fertilizer application techniques to promote crop growth while reducing leaching. (2016-07-25)

Solar power advances possible with new 'double-glazing' device
A new 'double-glazing' solar power device -- which is unlike any existing solar panel and opens up fresh opportunities to develop more advanced photovoltaics -- has been invented by University of Warwick researchers. (2017-12-07)

Frozen embryos result in just as many live births in IVF
Freezing and subsequent transfer of embryos gives infertile couples just as much of a chance of having a child as using fresh embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), research from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Adelaide, Australia has found. (2018-01-10)

Study: SNAP benefits aren't enough to afford a healthy diet
A new study finds that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, only covers 43-60 percent of what it costs to consume a diet consistent with federal dietary guidelines for what constitutes a healthy diet. The study highlights the challenges lower-income households face in trying to eat a healthy diet. (2017-09-07)

Trouble with parasites? Just migrate!
The researchers developed a model to explore whether combating infection could, in theory, be a potential benefit of migration. (2016-05-27)

Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)

Nanowires, the future of electronics
The current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design. The research led by Aurelio Mateo-Alonso (Ikerbasque researcher at POLYMAT, the Basque Excellence Research Center (BERC), a partner of the UPV/EHU) into nanowires is being published today in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications. (2017-06-07)

Chemical weathering controls erosion rates in rivers
Chemical weathering can control how susceptible bedrock in river beds is to erosion, according to new research. In addition to explaining how climate can influence landscape erosion rates, the results also may improve scientists' ability to interpret and predict feedbacks between erosion, plate tectonics and Earth's climate. The research, led by The University of Texas at Austin, was published in Nature on April 14, 2016. (2016-04-13)

Can a Mediterranean diet pattern slow aging?
A series of six articles appearing in the March issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences finds new correlations between a Mediterranean diet and healthy aging outcomes -- while also underscoring the need for careful approaches to the use of data in order to measure the diet's potential benefits. (2018-03-30)

In field tests, device harvests water from desert air
You really can extract clean drinking water right from the air, even in the driest of deserts, MIT researchers have found. They've demonstrated a real-world version of a water-harvesting system based on metal organic frameworks, or MOFs, that they first described last year. (2018-03-22)

Hot spot on Enceladus causes plumes
Enceladus, the tiny satellite of Saturn, is colder than ice, but data gathered by the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan has detected a hot spot that could mean there is life in the old moon after all. In fact, for researchers of the outer planets, Enceladus is so hot intellectually hot, it's smokin'. The hot spot is causing plumes of ice and vapor to arise above Enceladus, says Washington University's William B. McKinnon. (2007-12-17)

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future. (2019-01-04)

Both fresh and frozen embryos offer similar chances of baby after IVF
Researchers have found that in women who have infertility but ovulate normally, using fresh or frozen embryos for in vitro fertilization result in similar rates of live births. (2018-01-10)

Urban agriculture only provides small environmental benefits in northeastern US
'Buy local' sounds like a great environmental slogan, epitomized for city dwellers by urban agriculture. But when it comes to growing fruits and vegetables in vacant lots and on rooftops in cities, is the practice really better for the planet than conventional farming? A new analysis of urban agriculture in the northeastern US, reported in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, has found that the regional 'green' benefits consumers expect could be meager at best. (2017-06-21)

Foodborne pathogens hard to remove from produce, research is ongoing
Will you ever feel comfortable eating fresh spinach again? All raw agricultural products carry a minimal risk of contamination, said a University of Illinois scientist whose research focuses on keeping foodborne pathogens, including the strain of E. coli found recently on spinach, out of the food supply. (2006-10-02)

Database shows effects of acid rain on microorganisms in Adirondack Lakes
Researchers have long known that acid rain can severely decrease the diversity of plant and animal communities in fresh water lakes and ponds. However, little is known about how microscopic bacteria, which form the foundation of freshwater ecosystems, respond to acidification. (2008-06-23)

A muscle protein promotes nerve healing
Damaged fibres in the brain or spinal cord usually don't heal at all. Neuroscientists from Bochum have high hopes for new methods based on gene therapy. (2019-01-23)

Curiosity has the power to change behavior for the better
Curiosity could be an effective tool to entice people into making smarter and sometimes healthier decisions, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2016-08-04)

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggests
A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking. (2017-12-21)

Study finds source of toxic green algal blooms and the results stink
Florida's St. Lucie Estuary received national attention in 2016 as toxic green algal blooms wreaked havoc on this vital ecosystem. A new study contradicts the widespread misconception that periodic discharges from Lake Okeechobee were responsible. Water samples gathered and tested in the year-long study provide multiple lines of evidence that human wastewater nitrogen from septic systems was a major contributor to the high nitrogen concentrations in the estuary and downstream coastal reefs. (2018-01-09)

Study suggests possible link between highly processed foods and cancer
A study published by The BMJ today reports a possible association between intake of highly processed ('ultra-processed') food in the diet and cancer. (2018-02-14)

Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon
A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water -- resources that are scarce in much of the world. The resulting material is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste. (2018-12-24)

Survey finds 94 percent of Americans waste food at home, but simple changes can help
Taking inventory of your refrigerator and buying only what you need at the grocery store can help cut down the amount of food your family throws away, but when there are leftovers, experts say many Americans are too quick to throw good food in the trash. A new national survey by the American Dairy Association Mideast finds that 94 percent of Americans say they throw away food at home. In fact, the average person throws away 250 pounds of food each year. (2018-11-26)

Study in mice examines impact of reused cooking oil on breast cancer progression
New study in mice by University of Illinois researchers finds that the compounds in thermally abused cooking oils may trigger genetic, biochemical changes that hasten the progression of late-stage breast cancer, promoting tumor cells' growth and proliferation. (2019-03-21)

Evidence suggests rare deer lived 50 years beyond 'extinction'
Schomburgk's deer (Rucervus schomburgki) was added to the extinction list in 1938. But new evidence, gleaned from antlers obtained in late 1990 or early 1991, shows that it survived for at least an additional half century and might still be around today. (2019-09-06)

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